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Listings

: ORGAN RECITAL

by Rev. CYRIL JACKSON. Succentor of Southwark
Cathedral
Assisted bv MURIEL DOWELL (Violin)
Relayed from Southwark Cathedral

Contributors

Unknown: Rev. Cyril Jackson.

: Major OWEN RUTTER, ' Borneo '

MAJOR OWEN RUTTER has spent five years in British North Borneo as Magistrate and District Officer, and he has many interesting stories about the second largest island in the world. He is the author of many books of travel, but his two recent novels, ' Sepia ' and ' Chandu,' have at once brought him wider fame.

Contributors

Unknown: Major Owen Rutter

: Prof. Elliot Smith: The Movements of Living Creatures

In the ninth of this series of talks, Professor Elliot Smith presents some of the problems of movement that illustrate how complicated a business walking (which we learn to do automatically before we are old enough to remember it) can be. The poor frog, for instance, never gets quite used to manipulating four legs after being accustomed, as a tadpole, to swimming by merely flicking a long tail. That is why he crawls and jumps and never really walks at all.

Contributors

Speaker: Professor Elliot Smith

: Household Talk : The Ideal Home Exhibition

' THERE are few homes nowadays where modern invention has not found its way into the household arrangements, but there are even fewer where much does not remain to be done in the way of labour-saving devices and better hygiene. Each year's ' Ideal Home ' exhibition seems to contain more wonderful inventions than the last, and listeners will gather from to-day's talk that this year's is no exception to the rule.

: The Children's Hour

Folk Songs by David Brynley. 'The Giant Who Liked Jam' (Vera Alexander). 'Sandy's Pluck on the Playing Field' (Peter Martin)

: THE FOUNDATION'S OF MUSIC

The Sonatas of Mozart

: Old Empire Memories

Wherein we shall endeavour to recall for our listeners the tuneful melodies, gay comedy, and sparkling entertainment associated with the old Empire. Leicester Square, and the irresistible. light-hearted gaiety of its famous promenade.
THE CAST:
MARJORIE FULTON
OLIVE GROVES
JOHN RORKE
HAROLD KIMBERLEY
THE WIRELESS CHORUS and THE WIRELESS ORCHESTRA
Conducted by CUTHBERT CLARKE

Contributors

Unknown: Marjorie Fulton
Unknown: Olive Groves
Unknown: John Rorke
Unknown: Harold Kimberley
Conducted By: Cuthbert Clarke

: BOARDING v. DAY SCHOOLS

Debate between
Dr. CYRIL NORWOOD
Headmaster of Harrow and Mr. R. F. CHOLMELEY
Headmaster of Owen's School, Islington
The Rt. Hon. CHARLES TREVELYAX, M.P., in the Chair
Relayed from the Faculty of Arts Hall, London
THE subject of this discussion is one that will always perplex the minds of parents and provide the educationists with food for debate. To-night's protagonists are well matched. Dr. Cyril Norwood was himself educated at a famous day-school, the Merchant Taylors', and before becoming Headmaster of Harrow, he was in charge of Bristol Grammar School and of Mart-borough, one of the more modern public schools. Mr. Cholmeley is Headmaster of Owen's School. Islington, a very old foundation, and Mr. Tre velyan (who was at Harrow) was Parliamentary Secretary to the Board of Education before the war, and President of the Board under the Labour Government.

: CHAMBER MUSIC

THE COVENT GARDEN OCTET; WYNN REEVES
(1st Violin) ; CHARLES WOODHOUSE (2nd Violin) ; ALFRED HOBDAY (Viola) ; AMBROSE GAUNTLETT
(Violoncello) ; VICTOR WATSON (Double Bass) ; G. W. ANDERSON (Clarinet); EDWARD DUBRUCO
(Bassoon) ; AUBREY BRAIN (Horn)
QCHUBERT was an extraordinarily prolifie
Composer, and left many works in manuscript, of which this was one. It was written in 1824 for a certain Count Froyer, who was a Clarinettist. Schubert doubtless bore the Count particularly in mind in writing the part for his instrument. In the Second Movement it has a specially good chance to shine.
There are six Movements in the Octet.
I This has an introductory slow (Adagio) portion, lending straight into the lively Movement proper. Its jumpy opening three-noto motif recalls a figure noticed in the Adagio.
II The Clarinet has the opening melody : soon the First Violin joins it in a charming duet. The Movement goes on its leisurely way, singing out the loveliest melodies all the time.
III The skittish Scherzo starts with one vivacious rhythm that canters along the whole time, in the first section of the Movement. In the middle part (' Trio ') a smoother melody is set going, very quietly. Then the lively rhythm returns to round off the Scherzo.
IV A Tune with Variations : it is in the folk-songish vein that came very naturally to Schubert. There are seven Variations in all, every one clearly distinguishable.
V A Minuet follows, delightfully unsophisticated. The plan is similar to thai of the Scherzo.
VI This has an introductory slow portion somewhat dramatic in style, the 'Cello (and a moment later the upper Strings) keeping up a very soft throbbing background of accompaniment. The final, quick Movement then begins in a March-like style, though not loudly.

Contributors

Violin: Charles Woodhouse
Viola: Alfred Hobday
Viola: Ambrose Gauntlett
Unknown: Victor Watson
Clarinet: G. W. Anderson
Clarinet: Edward Dubruco








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