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Listings

: CONCERTS FOR SCHOOL CHILDREN

Arranged by the PEOPLE'S CONCERT SOCIETY, in co-operation with the B.B.C.
Relayed from, Battersea Town Hall
Eighth Concert of Fifth Series
THE AUDREY CHAPMAN ORCHESTRA, conducted by FRANK BRIDGE
FIRST PART
Devoted to music by BEETHOVEN
(1770-1827)
Fifth Symphony, First Movement
Overture, ' Egmont '
SECOND PART
Miscellaneous items, the titles of which will be given by the Announcer

Contributors

Unknown: Audrey Chapman

: THE CHILDREN'S HOUR : Songs with Choruses

by J. R. Castling. Soup (Mabel Marlowe ). 'The Call,' by H. Mortimer Batten.

Contributors

Unknown: J. R. Castling.
Unknown: Mabel Marlowe
Unknown: H. Mortimer Batten.

: BACH

Some of his Jolliest Keyboard Music
Played by JAMES CHING
Partita in G
SOMETHING was said about the Partitas on Tuesday. This one (the Fifth) consists of the following Movements:-
I PRÉAMBULE. The title is unusual with Bach, and the style is not that common in the preludes to his Suites, being light and fanciful.
II ALLEMANDE. A piece of serious and interestingly-worked counterpoint, mostly in two voices, but sometimes in three.
III Courante. There are two types of Courante, the French and Italian ; this is of the latter type-rapid, clear and flowing.
IV SABABANDE. Lighter-minded than most of Bach's Sarabandes.
V TEMPO DI MENUETTO. Not a Minuet for dancing—the cross rhythms (two beats in right hand against three in the left) make this clear.
V PASSEPIED. A delicate little thing.
VI Gigue. One of the most mature in style of all the Movements of this Partita. The very distinctive and rhythmically strong Subject, given out at the opening and taken up by three ' Voices,' fugue-wise, supplies material for the first half of the piece.
In the second half another Subject is similarly introduced and similarly taken up. Then, after a time, the first Subject appears again, in ingenious combination with the second.

Contributors

Played By: James Ching

: Prof. H. B. CHARLTON

Poetry and the Plain Man '—I. S.B. from Manchester
THIS is the first talk in a new series by the Professor of English Literature in the University of Manchester. To day he opens with an intriguing title-' The Wise Neglect of Poetry '

Contributors

Unknown: I. S.B.

: VARIETY

ETHEL HOOK (in some Favourite Ballads) MAIDIE SCOTT (Comedienne)
THE HOUSTON Sisters (The Irrepressibles) WILL KlNGS (Entertainer)
KIRKBY and HUDSON (Syncopated Duets)

: My Programme by Captain Harry Graham

Captain Harry Graham has already figured in the series of 'Modern Humorists,' when he read some verses from his latest book, 'Strained Relations.' Most listeners, however, will have been already familiar with his characteristic humour in one or other of its manifestations, for, besides his books, he was part author of such well-known plays as Madame Pompadour and Katja the Dancer, and lyrist of Betty in Mayfair, The Maid of the Mountains and The Lady of the Rose. Captain Graham's programme for tonight is, as is customary with 'My Programmes,' veiled in mystery, but we print below his own reply to our demand for enlightenment.

"You ask me to give you some idea of the lines upon which my Programme for March 11 is to be drawn up. I confess that the matter is causing me many sleepless days of earnest thought. It would be easy enough to design something that would be appreciated by the High-brow intelligentsia - something with a dash of Proust, Holst, Scriabin, Miss Sitwell and Mariuetti. Again, it would not be impossible to devise an ideal programme suitable for the groundlings, in which memories of the earliest excesses of our more red-nosed comedians would predominate. It will be my object, however, to avoid these two extremes, to steer a middle course and try to provide something that shall be acceptable to the normal mediumbrowed Englishman (like myself). And, since I am only human (though you may not have noticed this), it is quite natural for me to feel that the perfect programme must be one which consists almost exclusively of my own works. I shall enjoy it, anyhow, and after all, I take it, this is the most important thing."

Contributors

Presenter: Captain Harry Graham








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This site contains the BBC listings information which the BBC printed in Radio Times between 1923 and 2009. You can search the site for BBC programmes, people, dates and Radio Times editions.

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