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Listings

: POPULAR ORCHESTRAL PROGRAMME

MARY LOHDEN (Soprano)
GEORGE PIZZEY (Baritone) -
THE WIRELESS ORCHESTRA
Conducted by JOHN ANSELL

Contributors

Conducted By: John Ansell

: WALES v. FRANCE

A Running Commentary on the Second Half of the INTERNATIONAL RUGBY MATCH
S.B. from Swansea

: The Children's Hour

THE DAVENTRY QUARTET; 'A Fairy Tale Up to Date,' by A. J. Alan ; Pattern Weaving on Bells ' (with Handbell Illustrations by Mrs. Hughes), by William Roughton

: SCHUMANN'S MYRTLES'

Sung by DALE SMITH
THE last evening of our week of Schumann is devoted to the last seven songs of the Myrthen (Myrtles) cycle.
XX. Wie kann ich froh und munter sein ?
(0 how can I be blithe and glad ?) This is Burns' song about the bonnie lad who is . o'er the hills and far away.'
XXI. Was will die einsame Träne ? (What means the solitary tear ?) The poem, by Heine, speaks of a sorrow that cannot, like other passing griefs, be wept over and then forgotten. This sorrow is deeper and keener-love itself has departed like a breath.
XXII. Niemand. (Nobody.) A characteristically independent pronouncement of Burns. ' I am naebody's lord,' says he, and ' I'll be slave to naebody.' ' Nacbody cares for me,' is the conclusion, and so I I eare for naebody.'
XXIII. Im Westen. (In the West.) The last
Burns piece in this cycle. The maid, .as she goes to rest, looks not to North, South or East, for
Far in the West lives he I lo'e best,
The lad that is dear to my babie and me.
XXIV. Du bist wie cine Blume. (How like a flower thou art.) This is one of the three or four most popular Schumann songs. It is a sweet moment of musing upon one who is pure and fair, whose beauty arouses sweet sadness in the heart.
XXV. Aus den ostlichen Rosen. (Roses from the East.) The words are by Ruckert. A lover sends roses to a rosy-cheeked one-a message of spring to one in whose eyes- lurks the joy of spring.
XXVI. Zum Schluss.
(The End.) A parting won (of Rückert) to the ' Sister Bride,' for whom the lover has woven this imperfect garland of myrtle. Some day, in God's goodness (he ends), perfect love shall weave for her the perfect wreath.

Contributors

Sung By: Dale Smith
Unknown: Zum Schluss.

: Mr. Herbert Chapman: Football League Club Worries

A big club in the First Division of the Football League is now a large-scale financial concern, depending for its success primarily on the efficiency of an equally intricate human machine - the team. Managing a team that is to play right through a long, hard season, with such incidental excitements as Cup-ties and such complications as transfers and casualties, is a very arduous, expert and responsible job, and one of which Mr. Chapman, who is manager of the great London club, The Arsenal, is well qualified to speak.

: A VARIETY PROGRAMME

THE RAMBLERS in Spots of Harmonized Syncopation
TOM CLARE
(Entertainer at the Piano)
LOTTIE VENNE (the famous Comedy Actress)
ETHEL BAIRD and REX EVANS in a Pot-Pourri of Melody and Talk
The Comperes who can never agree-
CLAPHAM and DWYER

Contributors

Piano: Lottie Venne
Unknown: Ethel Baird
Unknown: Rex Evans

: Mr. BASIL MACDONALD HASTINGS reading a Short Story

TO-NIGHT'S instalment of the series of Modern
Humorists is supplied by a versatile and always amusing essayist, playwright and journalist. Mr. Macdonald Hastings has published several books of essays and is the author, or part-author, of many plays, including The Happy Ending, Razzle-Dazzle, Victory, If Winter Comes, and Hanky-Panky John. In addition, he was the founder of that lively production, ' Roosters and Fledgling?,' the Air Force magazine.

Contributors

Unknown: Mr. MacDonald Hastings

: THE EASTBOURNE MUNICIPAL ORCHESTRA

Under the direction of Captain H. 0. AMERS
BLANCHE ALLEN (Soprano)
Relayed from
DEVONSHIRE PARK, EASTBOURNE

: DANCE MUSIC

THE SAVOY ORPHEANS and THE SYLVIANS, from the Savoy Hotel








About this project

This site contains the BBC listings information which the BBC printed in Radio Times between 1923 and 2009. You can search the site for BBC programmes, people, dates and Radio Times editions.

We hope it helps you find information about that long forgotten BBC programme, research a particular person or browse your own involvement with the BBC.

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