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Listings

: BROADCAST TO SCHOOLS

Sir H. WALFORD DAVIES continues his informal series of talks on Elementary Music

: Mr. Loris GOLDING : 'Castles' and Caverns in Spa in '

A TRAVELLER with an . unfailing eye for the picturesque and a gift of describing it that is- amply demonstrated in such books as ' Sunward ' and ' Sicilian Noon.' Mr. Golding will have excellent scope for this descriptive power in the subject that lie is to talk about to-day.

: SCHUMANN'S ' POET'S LOVE '

Sung by DALE SMITH
TO-NIGHT we hear the second half of this song-cycle, commencing at the tenth song (Hor ich das Liedchen—I hear the Song). In this song the poet seeks the solitude of the mountains, to escape from his sad recollections.
Heine's ironical humour comes out in the eleventh song. Ein Jangling liebt ein Madchen (A Youth once loved a Maiden), in which is a cynical reflection on the course of love, as it sometimes runs.
The titles of the next three songs are
Am leuchtenden Sommermorgen (On a Bright Summer Morning), Ich hab' im Traum geiceinet (I Wept and I Dreamt) and Allnächtlich im Traume (Each Night in Dreams). In these the poet returns to his mood of sorrowful recollection. Waking or dreaming, the image of her who is lost to him is ever poignantly before him.
In the last song but one (Aus allen Märchen - From Old Fairy Tales) the poet longs for the visionary land of childhood's dreams, where all is peace and contentment. But with the break of morning these sweet visions fade.
In 'the last song of all (Die alten busen Lieder - The Old, Bad Songs) he calls for a mighty coffin, in which shall be buried all his sorrow and love intermingled.
The Pianist, in a last tender page, adds his note of regret and resignation, and so ends the story of the Poet's Love.

Contributors

Sung By: Dale Smith

: Prof. P. J. NOEL BAYER, 'Foreign Affairs and How They Affect Us—VI. The Outlook for the Future.' S.B. from Birmingham

IN this important series of talks the Professor of International Relations in the University of London has described, from an exceptional expert knowledge, the workings of the diplomatic machine by which the relations between countries are manipulated, and especially the comparatively new instrument, the League of Nations. He now concludes his series by discussing the outlook for the future, and listeners who have heard his previous talks will await with interest his summing-up, especially now that on so many sides are heard the Jeremiahs predicting the date of the next world war.

: A PROGRAMME OF HOWARD CARR'S MUSIC

Conducted by The Composer
HOWARD CARR. a Manchester man born in 1880, has spent nearly thirty years in conducting orchestras in theatres and concert-rooms, and in composing light Operatic music and suites.
THE WIRELESS SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
Nautical Suite, ' On the Briny '
A Last Step with Polly and Sal; The Shanty-man's Song; The Sentimental Bo'sun : Jolly Sea-Dogs
Intermezzo, ' The Crimson Fan '
Yorkshire Patrol, Bah Goom ' (Motto-If tha' does ought for nought, do it for tha' sen)
Graceful Dance, 'The Chiffon Frock' (1st Performance)
Shanties and Sea Songs (collected and arranged for Male Voices and Orchestra by Howard Carr ). Introduced by BOYD CABLE
Sung by FREDERICK RANALOW. with FRANK TITTERTON. HOWARD FRY, ARXOLD BEAUVAIS and THE WIRELESS CHORUS
Prelude. The Shrine in the Wood '
Symphonic March, ' The Adventurers '
THE Composer's note on The Shrine in the Wood
-L when it was first performed (at a Promenade Concert two years ago) was:
' An impression of the reverent beauty of a great shrine built with passionate faith, and now in ruins, in the heart of a Yorkshire dale.'
(Was it Fountains Abbey The Composer was for a time conductor of the Harrogate Orchestra.)

Contributors

Unknown: Howard Carr.
Unknown: Howard Carr
Introduced By: Boyd Cable
Sung By: Frederick Ranalow.
Unknown: Frank Titterton.
Unknown: Arxold Beauvais

: Sir H. WALFORD DAVIES, 'Beethoven' (VI)

LISTENERS should endeavour not to miss this
talk on Beethoven. Sir Walford Davies is, as everyone knows, a master of the microphone as well as a famous musician, and the series of addresses which he is now giving is of special interest in view of the approaching centenary of the great composer.

Contributors

Unknown: Sir Walford Davies

: POPULAR CLASSICS

THE WIRELESS SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA, conducted by HOWARD CARR .
EDWARD ISAACS (Solo Pianoforte)
SOME light pieces, mostly for Piano, were practically all that Rossini composed in the second half of his life. Respighi, one of Rossini's countrymen of a later day, put some of these together and made them into the music for the piece called The Eccentric Toyshop, with which the Russian Ballet has so often delighted us.
The dolls in a toyshop come to life at night, and dance — Cossack Dances, the Polish Mazurka, an Italian Tarantella, a Waltz, and other charming steps.

Contributors

Unknown: Howard Carr
Unknown: Edward Isaacs

: DANCE MUSIC

KETTNER'S FIVE, under the direction of GEOFFREY GELDER , from Kettner's Restaurant

Contributors

Unknown: Geoffrey Gelder








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