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: Concerts for School Children

Arranged by the PEOPLE'S CONCERT SOCIETY in co-operation with the BRITISH BROADCASTING CORPORATION
Fourth Concert of Fifth Series
The PEOPLE'S CONCERT ORCHESTRA
Conductor, CHARLES WOODHOUSE
Principal Violin, GEORGE STRATTON
The First Part devoted to Music by MOZART (1756-1791)
Symphony, in G Minor, Third and Fourth Movements
Minuet and Trio; Allegro Assai.
THE THIRD MOVEMENT is a cheerful, rather ceremonious 'Minuet and Trio,' or, in other words, two Minuets arranged in this way - First, Second, First.
The First Minuet is scored for full Orchestra throughout - but as Mozart has in this work used no Drums or any of the heavier brass instruments, his fullest scoring is on a fairly modest scale of loudness. The Second Minuet is very lightly scored.
The LAST MOVEMENT (Very quick) begins with a bustling First Tune, carried on at some little length. Then comes a sort of semi-colon cadence (Full Orchestra), and you feel that something new is about to begin. This proves to be the Second Tune, very much contrasted with the First, inasmuch as it is in slower notes, is gentle in feeling, and is scored for Violins and Violas only. As soon as these instruments have ended it (which does not take long, for it is only brief) the following pleasant combination takes it over, and repeats it with a few subtle little changes - Clarinet, immediately joined by Bassoon, and then by 'Cellos and Double Basses , and after a moment by the other instruments. This is another of these delicately coloured passages that help to make a hearing of this Symphony always such a pleasurable experience.
The first part of the Movement, (i.e.. the part which introduces the Tunes) having been played, some conductors repeat it (according to Mozart's directions and the custom of his day) and others proceed straight to the Second and Third Sections, in which the Tunes are first 'developed' and then 'recapitulated.'
Overture to 'The Magic Flute'
One of Mozart's last great works was that favourite Opera, The Magic Flute, which has been broadcast in full more than once.
Mozart was a Freemason. Freemasonry was very much 'in the air' at that time. and all the curious plot of The Magic Flute has Masonic ideas at its foundation.
There is much elaborate ceremonial in the Opera, and we hear suggestions of this in the impressive introduction to the Overture, and also later in its course.
After the Introduction we have the First Main
Tune. This is 'fugal,' i.e., one 'voice' (in this case an instrumental 'voice') starts all alone with the Tune; next another voice enters, repeating the Tune at a different pitch, and so on. This First Main Tune really runs through most of the Overture. For instance, Bassoons and Clarinets continue playing the beginning of it while Oboe and Flute are playing the Second Main Tune.
With this material the Overture trips along happily and straightforwardly, with only one serious check - when we have solemn ceremonial again recalled.
The Second Part of the Programme will include miscellaneous items, the titles of which will be given out by the Announcer

Contributors

Conductor: Charles Woodhouse
Violin: George Stratton
Unknown: Allegro Assai.
Unknown: Double Basses

: The Children's Hour

Items by children:
Recitations by Molly Mortimer and Nanea Fearnsides
Piano solos by Denise Hart and Dorcas Brown
Violin solos by George Jupp
Songs by Bessie Clayden

: CORELLI T

he Violin Sonatas given in the original style, by WILLIAM PRIMROSE (with bass played on the Violoncello by AMBROSE GAUNTLETT)
THE NINTH SONATA (in A), after the fashion of the Seventh and Eighth, contains one or two dance Movements, but Corelli does not here write a regular set or ' Suite ' of them.
There is a charmingly tuneful slow Movement, followed by the greatest possible contrast, a Jig, one of his happiest pieces, with the sort of tune that sticks in one's head. Before the next Movement, a Gavotte, there are no more than eight bars of slow interlude. The Violin begins the Gavotte by rather comically stalking down the scale and back again, like a man on stilts, treading stairs. I
The TENTH SONATA (in F) has a complete set of dances, like a Suite . Instead we have a Gavotte, the Movementr, standing thus : Prelude (a s!ow one), Allemande, Sarabande, Gavotte and Gigue.

Contributors

Unknown: William Primrose

: Prof. C. H. REILLY, ' Some Modern Buildings Problems—III. The Church of To-day.' S.B. from Liverpool

IN the first two Talks in this series, Professor
Reilly discussed the general problem of modern architecture-the application of sound principles to the particular needs of the present day-and with one particular aspect of it : the modern office block. This evening he goes on to consider recent developments in the designing of churches-still an important branch of architecture, although far fallen from its high estate of Gothic days, when architecture's greatest achievements were made in the ecclesiastical sphere, and secular buildings wero little more than a byproduct of the art. There has been a great revival in church architecture in this country since it was almost killed by the pseudo-Gothic craze, and, apart from such masterpieces as Bentley's Cathedral at Westminster and Scott's at Liverpool, many notable churches have been built in recent years. A picture of one of the most interesting of them—Maufe's church at Acton-appears, on this page.

: A CONCERT PARTY

directed by ERNEST LONGSTAFFE including
Tommy HANDLEY ; MARIE Dix ; MORTLAKE
WREN ; DORIS PALMER and GEOFFREY GWYTHER

Contributors

Directed By: Ernest Longstaffe
Unknown: Tommy Handley
Unknown: Marie Dix
Unknown: Doris Palmer
Unknown: Geoffrey Gwyther

: Mr. JOHN MASEFIELD

Reading His Own Poetry
MR. MASEFIELD is one of the most charac. teristic poets in the English language, as parodists have found to their joy. From his first book of poems, ' Salt Water Ballads,' to his great epics of sport, ' Reynard the Fox' and ' Right Royal,' one can trace the same qualities-a keen sense of the wind and the sea and the open country, a vigorous rhythm and life and movement that sweep over minor blemishes and crudities that would ruin the work of many a less sincere poet. In addition to his poems, of which the most notable are, besides those already mentioned, ' The Widow in the Bye Street,' ' The Everlasting Mercy ' and ' Dauber,' Mr. Masefield has recently written two great novels of adventure, ' Sard Harker ' and ' Odtaa,' and several religious plays.

Contributors

Unknown: Sard Harker

: MARIAN CAREW

(Soprano)
Songs by Dunhill, accompanied by the Composer
The Dandelion
The Queen of Heaven
In the Dawn
The Cloths of Heaven
Infant Joy
Tha Shepherd

: Mr. FLOTSAM and Mr. JETSAM

in Items from their Repertoire and A MUSICAL NEWS BULLETIN

: SPEECHES FOLLOWING THE ANNUAL DINNER OF H.M. CIVIL SERVICE

Relayed from the Great Hall, Connaught
Rooms
Toast : The Judges a.id Bar of England
Proposer : Sir CECIL HARCOURT SMITH
Responders : The Rt. Hon. Lord HANWORTH,
K.B.E., Master of the Rolls
Sir T. W. H. iNSKir, K.C., M.P.,
Solicitor-General
ON the second Friday in each February representatives of His Majesty's Civil Service, from the top to the bottom, meet together at dinner, with the Secretary to, the Treasury and head of the Civil Service in the chair, and entertain as guests a member of the Royal Family, representatives of His Majesty's Government, the heads of the Fighting Services, and in addition representatives of one of the professions. This year the special guests will include representatives of the Judges and Bar of England. Last year Literature was so represented, and in 1925 the High Commissioners for the British Dominions overseas attended.

Contributors

Unknown: Sir Cecil Harcourt Smith

: POPULAR ORCHESTRAL PROGRAMME

The WIRELESS ORCHESTRA
ASHMOOR Burcii (Baritone) (Soloist : CHARLES LEGGATT ) (Soloist, FREDERICK THURSTON ) (Soloist, ERNEST HINCHLIFF )

Contributors

Soloist: : Charles Leggatt
Soloist: Frederick Thurston
Soloist: Ernest Hinchliff








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