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Listings

: CONCERT.

AXDREW BROWN 'S QUINTET
FODEN'S No. 1 BRASS QUARTET LILIAN MANN (Contralto) GLYN DOWELL (Tenor)
EDITH BARNETT (Pianoforte)
ANDREW BROWN 'S QUINTET

Contributors

Unknown: Axdrew Brown
Contralto: Lilian Mann
Tenor: Glyn Dowell
Pianoforte: Edith Barnett
Pianoforte: Andrew Brown

: AFTERNOON Topics

MARION CRAN, F.R.H.S.,
A Garden Chat

: THE CHILDREN'S HOUR

Selection by the DAVENTRY QUARTET; 'The Ring and the Bee '

: VARIETY

GLOVER AND ARNOTT (Entertainers at the Piano) CLARKE AND RITCHIE (Song and Cross Talk) A Cartoon in Words

: Mr. FRANCIS TOYE

Next Week's Music

: WEATHER FORECAST, FIRST GENERAL NEWS BULLETIN

Sir FRANCIS OGILVIE : 'Jack Frost at Work '
SIR FRANCIS GRANT OGILVIE has been
Chairman of the Geological Survey Board since 1920. He has held many other important positions in the scientific world, including the Principal Assistant Secretaryship in the Department of Scientific and Industrial Research, and during the war he was Assistant Controller of the Trench Warfare Research Department, and, later, of the Chemical Warfare Department. He is a member of the Broadcasting Board of the G.P.O.

Contributors

Unknown: Sir Francis Ogilvie
Unknown: Jack Frost
Unknown: Sir Francis Grant Ogilvie

: Mr. SANTOS CASANI

'A Lesson in the Charleston '
No new dance of recent years has caused so much controversy as the Charleston. On the one hand, people denounce it as ugly, stupid, and positively dangerous to other dancers, and certain dance-halls have even banned it altogether. On the other hand, nearly everybody who takes the trouble to learn it becomes wildly enthusiastic about it... Also, it has been very effectively tamed since its first appearance, and the new Charleston could certainly not be accused of the dangers of ripped stockings and hacked shins that caused the old one to be condemned. Whatever one may think of it, the Charleston has come to stay, and anybody who wants to dance would be well advised to lose no more time in learning it. An introductory lesson from Santos Casani is a piece of good fortune that every dancer will appreciate. Mr. Casani is one of that aristocracy of teachers who teach teachers, and anything that he does not know about the Charleston may safely be left undanced.

Contributors

Unknown: Santos Casani

: 'MY LADY FRAYLE'

A Musical Play in Two Acts.
Book and Lyrics by ARTHUR WIMPERIS and . MAX PEMBERTON
Music by HOWARD TALBOT and HERMAN FINCK
Dramatis Personœ
Assisted by The Wireless Chorus and Orchestra
Conducted by JOHN ANSELL
Act I., Scene I : A Room at King's Frayle
Act I... Scene 2 : Ballroom at King's Frayle Act II. : The Gardens, King's Frayle
The Production under the Direction of R. E. JEFFREY
MY LADY FRAYLE was first produced at the Shaftesbury Theatre, in March, 1916.
On that occasion Miss Irene Browne (who is at the moment best known for her acting in the long run of No No Nanette) created the parts that she will take to-night. This play differs from the majority of musical plays in having a distinctly ' strong ' story ; in fact. there is a quite Faustian plot, and the appearances of the Devil (in his own shape, and not in the comparatively harmless form of Mr. Lucifer D. Nation) created quite a sensation in the stage production. This quality may perhaps be traced to the fact that Mr. Max'Pemberton. the novelist, is co-author, with Mr. Arthur Wimperis , of the ' book.' As for the music, no musical play could have a better pair of composers than Mr. Howard Talbot. the well-known theatrical conductor, and Mr. Herman Finck.

Contributors

Unknown: Arthur Wimperis
Unknown: Max Pemberton
Music By: Howard Talbot
Conducted By: John Ansell
Unknown: R. E. Jeffrey
Unknown: Miss Irene Browne
Unknown: Mr. Arthur Wimperis
Unknown: Mr. Howard Talbot.
Unknown: Mr. Herman Finck.

: ORGAN RECITAL.

by REGINALD FOORT. Relayed from the New
Gallery Kinema

Contributors

Unknown: Reginald Foort.

: BACH

Interpreted by CLAUD BIGGS
Fantasia and Fuguetta in D
Chromatic Fantasia and Fugue
THE first Fantasia is a short and simple piece. made up of two halves, very similar in general rhythmic cast, rounded off by a tiny Coda that sweeps up and down, the piece ending just as it began, but softly instead of in a declamatory style.
The Fughetta, as its name implies, is a small
affair. It runs its jig-like course in the gayest fashion, the three parts (dancers, as we may figure them) leaping lightly, in a good many times, with the chief tune, and treading a mazy course with the greatest neatness and dexterity.
In the second Fantasia (that preceding the Chromatic Fugue) are seen signs of the origin, in primitive organ display, of many pieces of this prelude type-a good deal of it being of the nature of mere bravura scale passages, or of a series of chords, each broken up, arpeggio-fashion. There is nothing contrapuntal about the piece ; it is mainly an exhibition of tone-effects, and as such very exciting. There are also some striking passages of a Recitative character.
The Fugue is one of the longest of all the Fugues Bach wrote for Clavichord or Harpsichord. Its well-thought-out and very logical structure is all the more effective after the uncontrolled impetuosity of the preceding Fantasia. It is in three ' voices.' The chromatic nature of the subject (its creeping by small degrees) naturally leads to much boldness of harmony.
The Chromatic Fantasia and Fugue probably date from about 1720, when Bach was thirty-five, and had already composed the greater part of his organ music.

Contributors

Unknown: Claud Biggs

: 'DAILY EXPRESS' NATIONALCOMMUNITY SINGING CONCERT

Relayed from the ROYAL ALBERT HALT...

: DANCE MUSIC

THE SAVOY OR-
PHEANS and THE SYLVIANS from the Savo\ Hotel








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