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Listings

: BROADCAST TO SCHOOLS

: Mrs. E. FIELDEN HODGSON
. ' " Geographical Discoveries-North and South Poles ' '

Contributors

Unknown: Mrs. E. Fielden Hodgson

: EVENSONG

, relayed from Westminster
Abbey

: AFTERNOON TOPICS

ANN SPICE, Books to Read

: THE CHILDREN'S HOUR

'Treacle Tart,' by OLIVE WRIGET : Zoo Fish Stories,' by L. G. M. of the Daily Mail : Piano Solos by ERNESTINE HEASMAN

Contributors

Unknown: Olive Wriget
Solos By: Ernestine Heasman

: DANCEMUSIC

THE LONDON RADIO DANCE BAND, directed by SIDNEY FIRMAN

Contributors

Directed By: Sidney Firman

: TIME- SIGNAL

BIG BEN : WEATHER FORECAST. FIRST GENERAL NEWS BULLETIN
Mr. C. LEWIS HIND : Six Great Artists and What They' Stand For-Rembrandt '
IN this. the second of his series of Talks on 'Six Great Artists end What They
Stand For,' Mr. Lewis Hind deals with Rembrandt, the seventeenth-century Dutch painter (he was bom in 16(16 and died in 1669) who has not yet been surpassed in the dramatic handling of light and shade. His portraits and Biblical scenes are very familiar in reproduction, and many listeners will remember his self-portrait in the National Gallery in London, which is reproduced, here.

Contributors

Unknown: Mr. C. Lewis Hind
Unknown: Mr. Lewis Hind

: Prof. J. ARTHUR THOMSON

' The Mind of the Lower Animals' S.B. from Aberdeen

: LIGHT SYMPHONY CONCERT

ARTHUR BECKWITH (Solo Violin)
THE WIRELESS SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA, conducted by GEOFFREY TOYE
BACH'S Violin Concertos have only an accompaniment of Strings with, in addition, a part for a Keyboard instrument. which builds up the accompanying harmonies from figures written over a single line of bass notes. In some of these Concertos the keyboard part is not indispensable. and it is often omitted. The usual plan was to give one Main Tune to the Soloist and another to the Orchestra, each dealing in a distinctive way with the material ?ntrusted to it.
Bach, in these Violin works, adopted the Italian model of a three-piece Concerto, including two quick Movements and a central slow one. That style is clearly exemplified in this. his Second Concerto. The contrast in mood between the irresistibly joyous, open-air First and Last Movements, and the serious, reflective Second Movement is very great.
Bach was in the habit of arranging some of his music for different instruments from those for which it was originally written. This is one of the works so re-written. He arranged it for Keyboard. changing its key from E to D. That practice shows how. in Bach's time. there was not yet the fullest distinction between Pianoforte style and Violin style.
MAURICE RAVEL holds a place of honour among modern French composers. His position has so long been established that one almost regards him as a veteran, though he is, in fact, only fifty-one years of age. His music is particularly sensitive and delicate, and he has a quite individual style.
This work is one of his best, though on a small scale. It is scored for a small Orchestra, consisting of the usual Woodwind (there is only one Oboe. however), two Horns, one Harp and Muted Strings.
A Pavane was originally a dance, of a slow, stately character. Its solemn nature makes it specially suitable for a memorial piece.
Ravel's Pavane centres round a slow, sustained melody, the first part of which is given out by Horn. the second part as a duet-Oboe and Bassoon. It is beautifully scored throughout.
MOZART'S last three Symphonies (and, by common consent, his greatest three) were written within the short space of less than two months, at a time near the end of his life when he was in poverty; and suffering from what he described to a friend as 'gloomy thoughts ' which, he said. he ' must repel with all his might.' The Jupiter, which we are now to hear, is one of these last Symphonies. Why Jupiter ? Mozart never called it that. But somebody, apparently, thought it expressed lofty, godiike qualities, and so gave it this name, which is surely not inapt.
There are four Movements :-
1. Quick and spirited. 2. Slow. soft, and song-like. 3. A gay little Minuet. 4. A Finale, rising to a dazzling climax.

Contributors

Unknown: Arthur Beckwith
Unknown: Geoffrey Toye
Unknown: Maurice Ravel

: SCHUBERT

Piano. DUETS interpreted by CECll. DIXON and V. HELY Hutchinson
Andante end Variations ; Children's March ; Characteristic March, No. 2
HERE is another of Schubert's sets of Variations. It is described as ' on French motifs.' The Tune, in a minor key, is first given out quietly, and then follow the four Variations. The First follows the Tune's main outline, decorating it, and running along in a dainty, tripping fashion.
The Second starts with one loud note, but is otherwise quiet. It has an effect, we may say, as of a distant dance, or (noting the trumpet-like (all in it) as of the summons and bustling attendance of a fairy troop.
The Third Variation keeps up an evenly-running pace of twelve short notes to the bar, still in a light and fleeting style.
For the last Variation Schubert pops into the major key, goes a little more slowly, and gives us more rhythmical and emotional variety than before. The last page has a charming figured decoration of rapid scalic runs going on aloft ; and then, to end the work, the Tune is finally recalled in its simple form.

Contributors

Unknown: Hely Hutchinson

: WEATHER FORECAST

SECOND GENERAL NEWS BULLETIN. Local
Announcements

: THE NEWPORT MUSICAL SOCIETY

Conducted by D. BRINLEY WILLIAMS

Contributors

Conducted By: D. Brinley Williams








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