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: LUNCH-TIME Music

from the HOTEL METROPOLE

: Broadcast to Schools

M. Stéphan, 'Elementary French '

: CONCERTS FOR SCHOOL CHILDREN

(Relayed from Church Street Baths, Camberwell) Arranged by the PEOPLE'S CONCERT SOCIETY, in co-operation with the B.B.C. THIRD CONCERT of the FOURTH SERIES
MABEL RITCHIE (Soprano)
HERBERT SIMMONDS (Baritone) JOSEPH SLATER (Flute)
JESSIE HALL (Pianoforte)
The first part is devoted to music by JOSEPH HAYDN (1732-1809)
FINALE (very quick) from Flute Sonata
Song, My Mother Bids Me Bind My Hair '
Aria, ' With Joy the Impatient Husbandmen ' (from Spring, the first part of The Seasons)
Pianoforte Sonata, No. 7, in three short movements: Quick and spirited; Slow and sustained; Quick, but not too much so Duet from The Creation, 'Gentle Consort'
The second part of the programme will include miscellaneous items, the titles of which will be given out by the Announcer.

Contributors

Soprano: Mabel Ritchie
Baritone: Herbert Simmonds
Flute: Joseph Slater
Music By: Joseph Haydn

: THE CHILDREN'S HOUR

Songs by CHRISTINE BYWATER
A Story told by Harcourt Williams
' The Magic Collar' (H. Mortimer Batten )

Contributors

Songs By: Christine Bywater
Told By: Harcourt Williams
Unknown: H. Mortimer Batten

: ORCHESTRAL MUSIC-FRANK WESTFIELD'S ORCHESTRA

, from the Prince of Wales Playhouse,
Lewisham

: Mr. PERCY SCHOLES

, the B.B.C. Music
Critic

: 'FAUST'

The Opera by Gounod Cast:
THE WIRELESS CHORUS; Cho; as Master, STANFORD ROBINSON
THE WIRELESS SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA, conducted by PERCY PITT
A UTHORS, dramatists, and musicians of many countries have been attracted by the legend of Faust. Our own Marlowe dealt with it finely, but the best known treatment of the story' is Goethe's work, on which one of the most popular of all Operas, Gounod's, is based.
Gounod's Faust is usually given in five Acts, which may be briefly summarized as follows :- In ACT ONE, the philosopher, Faust, is found alone in his study, in which he has spent his whole life. He invokes the Devil (Mephistopheles), who comes to him, and, showing him a vision of a beautiful young girl, offers him renewal of youth in exchange for his soul. Faust signs the contract. He is given a potion to drink, and is rej uvenated.
ACT Two has for its setting a Fair, with soldiers, students, and townsfolk making merry. A youth, Siebel, promises to protect the girl Marguerite in the absence of her brother, the soldier Valentine. Mephistopheles joins the crowd, and afterwards Faust, who asks Mephistopheles to show him the maiden who appeared in his vision-Marguerite. Faust approaches her, but she gently repels him.
In ACT THREE Siebel leaves a bouquet of flowers as a present for Marguerite in her garden. Mephistopheles, on Faust's behalf, then leaves a casket of jewels for Marguerite. The girl finds both, and with her old companion, Martha, is enraptured by the jewels.
The rest of this Act is taken up with Faust's wooing of Marguerite, who eventually yields to him. The mocking laugh of Mephistopheles is heard.
ACT FOUR. Marguerite, spurned in her downfall by her friends, goes to the church, but is mocked by Mephistopheles.
Valentine returns with other soldiers from the war. He finds Mephistopheles singing a mock serenade to his sister, and fights a duel with Faust, in which Valentine falls dead cursing Marguerite.
The scene in ACT FIVE is the prison in which Marguerite is awaiting execution for murdering her child. In semi-delirium she recalls the happy day on which she first met Faust. Her lover enters with Mephistopheles, and bogs her to go away with him. She refuses, and takes refuge in prayer. Her soul is borne to Heaven while Faust watches in despair, then falls on his knees in prayer

Contributors

Unknown: Stanford Robinson
Unknown: Percy Pitt

: Capt. HARRY GRAHAM

'The Aunt Question'
CAPTAIN HARRY GRAHAM , the second of the Contemporary Humorists who are giving characteristic examples of their humour in a series arranged this autumn, is the author of many books of humorous verse and prose, of which 'The Motley Muse ,' 'The World We Laugh In,' and ' The Last of the Biffins' are among the best known. He is also part-author of some of the most successful musical plays of recent years, including ' Whirled Into Happiness ' and ' Toni,' and he contributed the lyrics to several others, such as 'Maid of the Mountains' and 'The Lady of the Rose.'

Contributors

Unknown: Captain Harry Graham
Unknown: Motley Muse

: BEETHOVEN interpreted by MAURICE COLE

Sonata, Op. 57 (the 'Appassionata') Concluded Les Adieux, Op. 81a, Movement 1
THE Last Movement of the Appassionata maintains the mysterious and sombre tone of the earlier part of the Sonata, but with an added note of urgency and stress. According to Ries, a pupil of Beethoven, the music was composed during a stormy night.
The Sonata next played is one of the few instrumental works to which Beethoven gave titles. It was dedicated to the Composer's close friend, the Archduke Rudolph. In 1809 the French were advancing on Vienna, and the Archduke, with the Imperial family, had to leave the city. When a few days later it was besieged, Beethoven had to seek refuge in a cellar.
The First Movement, then, is a tribute of respect and affection on the Archduke's departure (only, as it proved, for some eight months).
Over the three chords which open the slow Introduction to the Movement, Beethoven wrote 'Lebewohl' ('Farewell!'), thus making this phrase the ' motto ' of the Movement. This motif is woven into the texture of the music in the most beautiful ways. The First Main Tune contains this descending three-note figure ; tho Second Main Tune begins with it, in longer notes. It permeates and sweetly binds together the whole Movement.

Contributors

Unknown: Archduke Rudolph.








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