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: SPEECHES

following the Annual Luncheon of the BRITISH PASSENGER AGENTS' ASSOCIATION Relayed from Edward VII. Room, Hotel Victoria
Programme :
' THE KING, THE QUEEN, PRINCE OF WALES AND THE ROYAL FAMILY,'
By Mr. JOHN FRAME (President of the Association)
'Our OVERSEAS DOMINIONS '
Proposer: The Right Hon. VISCOUNT BURNHAM. Companion of Honour of The British Empire Responders :
Mr. J. BRUCE WALKER , Director of European Emigration for Canada (representing the High Commissioner)
Sir JOSEPH Cook , G.C.M.G., High Commissioner for Australia

Contributors

Unknown: Viscount Burnham.
Unknown: Mr. J. Bruce Walker
Unknown: Sir Joseph Cook

: Broadcast to Schools

-Mrs. E. FIELDER
HODGSON-' Geographical Discoveries : Columbus -Cabot-Vespucci '

: EVENSONG

relayed from WESTMINSTER ABBEY

: THE CHILDREN'S HOUR

Squince and the Wood Cutter ' (Olwen Bowcen ) ; ' Animals You Will Never Meet.' by One Who Has (The Wisked Uncle again); Songs

Contributors

Unknown: Olwen Bowcen

: DANCE MUSIC-THE LONDON RADIO DANCE BAND

, directed by SIDNEY FIRMAN

Contributors

Directed By: Sidney Firman

: Prof. J. ARTHUR THOMSON. M.A..

'The Mind of Animals-The Mind of Common Mammals

: MILITARY BAND CONCERT

THE WIRELESS MILITARY BAND: Conducted by JOHN ANSELL
WINIFRED SMALL (Solo Violin)
A GOOD many of us remember clearly Queen
Victoria's Diamond Jubilee in 1897-after all, less than thirty years ago ! It was then that Elgar wrote this Imperial March, which, with its broad, swinging tune, and brilliant colouring, immediately became popular.
JEAN SIBELIUS was born in 1805, and is foremost among Scandinavian composers.
He is popularly best known in this country by his Valse Trisic. Finlandia expresses the rugged Finnish nature so powerfully that its performance was forbidden in Russia when, some years ago. the two countries were at enmity. It should be noted that the hymn-like tune in Finlandia which is often taken for a folk-song, is, in fact, the Composer's own.

Contributors

Conducted By: John Ansell
Unknown: Jean Sibelius
Unknown: Valse Trisic.

: Mr. PLUNKET GREENE'S LECTURE RECITAL

Interpretation in Song-II. Rhythm and Diction. With Illustrations by Himself. At the Piano- SAMUEL LIDDLE. (N.B. -The words of Mr. Plunket Greene 's songs will be found on p-ige 130.)

Contributors

Piano: Samuel Liddle.
Unknown: Mr. Plunket Greene

: Beethoven Pianoforte Sonatas

interpreted by Maurice Cole
Sonata, Op. 57 (Apassionata), First and Second Movements

The title was given to this Sonata by Cranz, Beethoven's publisher, without the composer's authority. It was written, along with several other works, while Beethoven was planning his only Opera, Fidelio, in 1806. His biographer, Schindler, says that he 'composed it straight-away, from beginning to end, during a short period of rest at the house of his friend, Count Brunswick', to whom it is dedicated.

There is in the opening movement (which doubtless suggested the name), a matured, concentrated power and a sombre tenderness that we find in equal measure in scarcely any of his earlier keyboard works. When Schindler asked the meaning of the work, Beethoven is said to have replied 'Read Shakespeare's Tempest'. That does not mean that the composer had the play in mind when he wrote the music, but something of the scope and force of the play's emotional life may be paralleled in the music, if one wishes to make such comparisons.
The first movement has a minor-key first main tune of nervous energy, dark and mysterious. Note the four-note figure in the bass, in the third phrase. It is very similar to that which plays so important a part in the first movement of the Fifth Symphony.

The mood is changed for a moment by the opening strain of the second main tune, a happy, singing, major-key melody. We shall find that the composer makes magnificent use of that when he comes to the working out or 'development' of his ideas. Another part of the second main tune is in agitated mood.

The whole course of the long movement is dramatic, from its striking first phrase until the same motif dies away in the depths at the end.

In the second movement we hear again how finely Beethoven, after a first movement full of excitement and stress, lets down the tension in the next, without making too violent a contrast. Here we have, as slow movement, a set of three variations on a beautiful subdued melody. Note how its emotional effect is enhanced by its being played in the lower half of the keyboard.

The first variation introduces a syncopated left-hand part, the melody being given out in detached notes. In the second variation the tune is in the midst of a gentle ripple of arpeggios. The last variation has a rapidly-running accompaniment, and part of the melody is syncopated. Then it returns in simple form, and when we expect a final chord, the composer, with a very different one, twice repeated, sounds a questioning note, before plunging into the last movement. for which, however, we shall have to wait until tomorrow evening.

Contributors

Pianist: Maurice Cole

: A FLUTE RECITAL

By Edith Penville

Contributors

Unknown: Edith Penville

: Dance Music

The Savoy Orpheans and Savoy Havana Band from the Savoy Hotel.








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