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Listings

: CAMILLE COUTURIER'S ORCHESTRA

, from Restaurant Frascati

: Broadcast to Schools

Mr. GERALD GOULD and Miss MARY SOMERVILLE:' 'English Composition and Heading'

: ETHEL M. HEWITT

; Women Doctors Through the Centuries '

: ORGAN RECITAL by REGINALD FOORT

relayed from the New Gallery Kinema

: THE CHILDREN'S HOUR

'The Aunts' and Uncles' Corner'

: DANCE MUSIC-THE LONDON RADIO DANCE BAND

. directed by SIDNEY FIRMAN

Contributors

Directed By: Sidney Firman

: The Week's Work in the Garden

by the Royal Horticultural Society

: Dr. G. C. SIMPSON

C.B.
' Thunderstorms '
(under the auspices of the Royal Meteorological Society)
DR. SIMPSON has been
Director of the Meteorological Office since 1920. He has been on the staff of the Indian Meteorological Department, and investigated the electrical conditions of the atmosphere in Lapland, and lie waa Physicist to the British Antarctic Expedition of 1910-12. Readers will remember his article in The Radio Times of September 10, in which he explained the real meaning of the more cryptic phrases ih the Weather Reports.

: 'THE PASSING OF THE THIRD FLOOR BACK'

An Idle Fancy, by JEROME K. JEROME
Arranged for Broadcasting and Presented by R. E. JEFFREY
Characters:
Scene : The first floor front of 13, Bloomsbury Place, London, W.C.
It is Friday afternoon in November.

Contributors

Unknown: Jerome K. Jerome
Presented By: R. E. Jeffrey

: Sir OLIVER LODGE

F.R.S., D.Sc. : ' Atoms and. Worlds-The Atom of Electricity'

: BEETHOVEN interpreted by MAURICE COLE Sonata

Op. 53 (the ' Waldstein ') Second and Third Movements
THE Second Movement (or Introduction to the Finale) is one of Beethoven's most romantic, mysterious pieces, largely consisting of shifting harmonies.
After pausing on the last dying sounds we break into a joyous, though grandiose Rondo, a kind of sublimated Dance, in which one triumphant melody recurs time after time. In the middle there comes a feeling of greater pomp and solemnity. The end is almost vertiginous.

: POPULAR CHAMBER MUSIC.

THE PHILHARMONIC PIANO QUARTET:
CHARLES KELLY (Pianoforte) ; PAUL BEARD (Violin) ; FRANK VENTON (Viola) ; JOHAN C. HocK (Violoncello)
DOROTHY NEVILLE-WHITE (Mezzo-Soprano)
PAUL BEARD, JOHAN C. HOCK and CHARLES KELLY
GABRIEL FAURÉ was an eminent French composer and teacher who died a couple of years ago, at the age of seventy-nine. Among his best work (certainly his most distinctive, characteristically French, music) may be included his songs, of which ho wrote very many. His First Quartet for Piano, Violin, Viola, and 'Cello is in the customary four distinct Movements, the first two of which arc played to-night.
NARRATIVE POETRY by Brat Harte, read by RICHARD CLOUDESLEY SAVAGE
COMPOSERS do not very often rearrange their own works for different instruments than those for which the music was conceived. Yet the Quartet of Beethoven that we are going to hear was originally written for Oboe, Clarinet, Bassoon, Horn and Piano. Probabiv Beethoven thought it would be likely to be frequently performed if he arranged it for the more common instruments, Violin, Viola, 'Cello, and Piano. On those instruments we arc to hear it to-night.
BRAHMS concludes his first
Piano Quartet (which he wrote when he was thirty, just after he had gone to live in Vienna) with a Movement which ho describes as 'alia Zingarese'-that is, in the style of the gypsy music that was commonly to be heard in Hungary at that time. His interest in this variety of folk-music had been aroused ten years before. Engagements were notvery numerous then. and the youngcomposer was glad to go on a concert tour with the violinist, Rempnyi, playing his accompaniments. Remenyi was partly of tho Hungarian extraction, and included some of that country's folk-tunes in his programmes. Brahms was much attracted
-by these airs, and made arrangements of some of them. Later, he more than once used the rhythms and melodic peculiarities of the Hungarian folk-songs and dances in his orchestral works; for instance, in the last Movement of his Violin Concerto, and in the Quartet Movement now played.

Contributors

Violin: Frank Venton
Read By: Richard Cloudesley Savage
Piano: Probabiv Beethoven








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