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: ORGAN

ORGAN Recital By WILLIAM WOLSTENHOLME , relayed from St. Lawrence Jewry
Short Address by the Rev. W. P. BESLEY. Hymn
Improvisation

Contributors

Unknown: William Wolstenholme

: Sir H. WALFORD DAVIES

'Elementary Music and Musical Appreciation '

: FOR THE CHILDREN

Ronald Gourley at the Piano brightens up the programme, while the Wicked Uncle ' films ' the Children's Hour-and probably spoils it.

Contributors

Unknown: Ronald Gourley

: DANCE Music. THE LONDON RADIO DANCE BAND

, Directed by SIDNEY FIRMAN

Contributors

Directed By: Sidney Firman

: WEATHER FORECAST

FIRST GENERAL NEWS BULLETIN

: Mr. W. F. BLETCHER

Spanish Talk. S.B. from Manchester

: Dialogue between Dame HENRIETTA BARNETT

D.B.E., and Mr. T. HANCOCK NUNN, The English Bunker's Hill, A Landmark of Friendship'
DAME HENRIETTA BARNETT is Chairman of a Committee of English and American people which has been formed to purchase Bunker Hill, adjoining Hampstead Heath, and retain it permanently as a public open space, containing a memorial to Anglo-American partnership in the War. This would, it is thought, form an appropriate complement to the more famous Bunker's Hill, near Boston, in America, on the summit of which stands a monument to Commemorate the first battle fought by American against British troops in the War of Independence.

Contributors

Unknown: Dame Henrietta Barnett

: RONALD GOURLEY

Selections from his Repertoire

: THE B.B.C. INTERNATIONAL SERIES OF CHAMBER CONCERTS

(First Concert)
Relayed from the GROTRIAN HALL, LONDON
MARIA BAStLlDES (Singer). (First Appearance in England)
THE HUNGARIAN STRING QUARTET:
EMERIC WALDBAUER; lACK KESSLER; JEAN DE TEMESVARY; EUGÉNE DE KERPELEY
THE Pianist-Composcr-Conductor Dohnanyi
-L (born in 1877) began to write music when he was not much over six. He is best known to us as a much-travelled concert, pianist and as the composer of some sprightly and piquant Orchestral Variations.
This Quartet is being performed for the first time, from the manuscript parts. Its three movements contain plenty of variety and liveliness.
The First is. quick, and emotionally somewhat agitated. The Slow Movement is an example of Variation form, of which Dohnanyi is very fond, and in manipulating which he has a particularly happy touch. He sets out a slow air of religious cast, and proceeds to show it in a charming series of varied settings.
The Last Movement, in the gayest spirits, is one of those exuberant jollifications with which the composer seems to delight in winding up his works.

: MARIA BASILIDES

MARIA BASILIDES , a distinguished Hungarian Operatic Singer, who is making her first appearance in England, is well known in Budapest, where she appeared in Opera, notably in 'J he Carnival Wedding (shortly to be produced in London, by the way). She has also been guest Soloist at the Dresden Opera.

Contributors

Unknown: Maria Basilides

: EMERIC WALDBAUER

IACK KESSLER and JEAN
DE TEMESVÁRY
UNTIL quite recent years most people's knowledge of modern Hungarian music
.was largely confined to that of Liszt, Korbay, and. a few other composers.
Most of these wore active in preserving, and often in using in their works, the songs of the gypsies. Most of the leading Hungarian composers of to-day, it is interesting to note, are equally solicitous for the preservation of folk-songs ; they go back, however, to an earlier folk-music than that of the gypsies, and base a good deal of their music on these melodies, many of which they found among the Slavs and Roiunanians, as well as among the Magyars. Bela Bartok (born 1881) and Zoltan Kodaly (1882), two of the chief composers of modern Hungary, were loaders in the new campaign, and both have collected large numbers of folk-tunes, Kodaly alone having taken down from the lips of peasants over three thousand five hundred such songs. The idiom of both has largely grown out of that of folk-melody, though both have a strongly individual style.
Kodaly has also been influenced first by Brahms, and then by Debussy. Works of his already heard in this country include a Sonata for 'Cello alone (Op. 8), a Duet for Violin and 'Cello (Op. 7), a Trio for Two Violins and Viola (Op. 12)- and a String Quartet (Op. 2).
This Serenade, one of- the composer's most attractive works, is cast in three Movements. The First and Last have a certain simplicity and winsomeness that remind us of the folk-speech. The lively Last Movement, in particular, shows how healthy and invigorating the influence of that idiom can be. The Slow Movement consists of a conversation between First Violin and Viola, while the Second Violin keeps up a soft background of murmuring tone.

Contributors

Unknown: Bela Bartok
Unknown: Zoltan Kodaly

: MARIA BASILIDES

BARTOK, who began to compose when he was nine, entered the Royal Hungarian
High Schcol for Music at Budapest, and first became known, not as a Composer, but as a Pianist. His latent aptitude for composition was awakened by hearing Strauss's Symphonic Poem, Thus Spake Zdrathustra, and soon he was producing works in various forms, including a Symphonic Poem of his own, entitled Kossuth (the name of the leader of the Hungarian Revolution in the middle of the last century), which Richter performed at a Halle Concert in Manchester.
A Piano Quintet and some pieces were other early works. He has devoted a great deal of his time to his studies in folk music, travelling as ' far afield as Arabia in his investigations. He has put his view of the attitude of the composer to folk-music .very clearly. Its -appropriate use, he says, ' is not, of course, limited to the sporadic introduction or the imitation of these melodies, or to the arbitrary thematic use of them in works of foreign or international tendencies. It is rather a question of absorbing the means of musical expression hidden in this treasure of folk-tunes, just as the most subtle possibilities of any language may be assimilated. It is necessary for the composer to command the musical language so completely that it becomes the natural expression of his own musical ideas.'
Perhaps the work which best shows Bartok's manner of utilizing folk material, is his Dance Suite, written in 1923, for a concert that celebrated the fiftieth anniversary of the union between the cities of Buda and Pest. Bartok's style, here as in most of his later works, is bold and uncompromising. The Suite, which has been heard two or three times in London, is one of the most vigorous and vital products of the new Hungarian School.

: THE QUARTET

Allegro Risoluto ; Adagio ; Allegro Risoluto, Allegro non Presto
MOLNAR is one of the youngest of present-day Hungarian composers of note, having been born in 1890. From 1910 to 1913 he played the Viola in the Quartet which to-night is performing his work.
The composition which is being given for the first time this evening is described as a ' Short Quartet in four Movements. The First is cheerfully resolute, the Second is completely serious, the Third is lively and bold, and tha Last quick, impetuous and forceful.

: Sir H. WALFORD DAVIES

Mus. Doc, 'Music and the Ordinary Listener.'

: BEETHOVEN

interpreted by MAURICE Cout
Sonata in A Major, Op. 2, No. 2 (Concluded)
Sonata in D Major, Op. 10, No. 3 (Movement 1)
THE THIRD MOVEMENT of the Sonata in A shows Beethoven already at work upon the ideas of his predecessors, re-shaping them, and giving new significance to old forms.
This Movement was, with Haydn and Mozart, almost invariably a graceful Minuet. Beethoven soon inaugurated the' brighter Third Movements ' idea, writing 'Scherzo'-a playful, often skittish piece, with plenty of quick contrasts of tone, and unexpected little turns of phrase, pauses, and what not. Of such a type this Third Movement is an early example.
The LAST MOVEMENT follows the plan of most such Finales of the time, in being cast in ' Rondo ' form-that in which one Main Tune comes round (hence the name ' Rondo ') several times with varied interludes between its appearances. Note how, not content with merely duplicating this tune on its second and third appearances, Beethoven decorates it with little tripping notes.

: A SONG RECITAL by DALE SMITH (Baritone)

Deh, Deh, Dove son Fuggiti (Why, Why, Must








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