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Inside Cinema

Shorts Unmerry Christmas

How - and why - the best Christmas movies are far from heart-warming.

Inside Cinema explores how - and why - the best Christmas movies are far from heart-warming. From The Grinch to Bad Santa, It’s a Wonderful Life to Dickens’ A Christmas Carol, this festive trip to the cinema is guaranteed to bring an icy tear to your cheek.

Inside Cinema

Shorts Childhood Nightmares

Why are some of the most nightmare-inducing movies actually intended for children?

Why are some of the most nightmare-inducing movies actually intended for children? Cower behind the sofa with Inside Cinema as we dig into cinema's most terrifying family films, showing how beloved kids classics from Watership Down and Pinocchio to Spirited Away and The NeverEnding Story play on very adult fears.

Inside Cinema

Shorts Forever Young

How digital de-aging is conquering Hollywood, granting stars eternal, cinematic youth.

How the trend of "youthification" is conquering Hollywood, from Ang Lee de-aging Will Smith in Gemini Man to Martin Scorsese getting out the magic paintbrush to make Joe Pesci, Al Pacino and Robert De Niro several decades younger in The Irishman.

Inside Cinema explores how the age of the actor has been tweaked over the years, from hiring a younger lookalike for flashbacks - Moneyball, for example - to using the performer's son (Ice Cube's son O'Shea Jackson Jr. in Straight Outta Compton) to the more recent Marvel CGI chicanery in Iron Man 3, with Robert Downey Jr, and Guardians Of The Galaxy 2, with Kurt Russell.

Inside Cinema

Shorts Taboo Breaking Bollywood

Nikki Bedi and Inside Cinema tour the cutting-edge of socially-conscious Indian cinema.

Nikki Bedi takes Inside Cinema on a tour along the cutting-edge of socially-conscious Indian cinema, highlighting how big stars are lending their wattage to films tackling important issues, from the feminist wrestling drama Dangal to the taboo-breaking sanitary-product blockbuster, Pad Man.

Warning: Note that this film contains some upsetting scenes.

The Joy of Painting

Series 1 Hidden Stream

Escape to Bob Ross's depiction of a summer idyll.

Bob Ross creates another work of art in his series of 30-minute masterpieces, a warm summer idyll complete with a clear blue sky, shady trees and the perfect spot for a swim.

American painter Bob Ross offers soothing words of encouragement to viewers and painting hobbyists in an enormously popular series that has captivated audiences worldwide since 1982. Ross is a cult figure, with nearly two million Facebook followers and 3,000 instructors globally. His soothing, nurturing personality is therapy for the weary, and his respect for nature and wildlife helps heighten environmental awareness.

In this series, Ross demonstrates his unique painting technique, which eliminates the need for each layer of paint to dry. In real time, he creates tranquil scenes taken from nature, including his trademark ‘happy’ clouds, cascading waterfalls, snow-covered forests, serene lakes and distant mountain summits.

Many of Bob’s faithful viewers are not painters at all. They are relaxing and unwinding with Bob’s gentle manner and encouraging words, captivated by the magic taking place on the canvas.

Bob Ross creates another work of art in his series of 30-minute masterpieces, a warm summer idyll complete with a clear blue sky, shady trees and the perfect spot for a swim.

Credits

Presenter
Bob Ross
Producer
Bob Ross

Fabric of Britain

Episode 1: Knitting's Golden Age

How knitting rose from basic craft to the height of popular fashion in the 20th century.

The story of how knitting rose from basic craft to the height of popular fashion in the 20th century, and sustained Britain through the hardships of war.

Documentary exploring how knitting rose from basic craft to the height of popular fashion in the 20th century. It's a craft that has given us scratchy jumpers, sexy bathing costumes and the infamous poodle loo cover, has sustained Britain through the hardships of war and shown a mother's love to generations of little ones. Today, knitwear has become a staple of every wardrobe thanks to a prince's golfing taste, The Beatles and 80s breakfast television. Warm-hearted and surprising, this is the story of the people's craft, and a very British one at that.

Credits

Narrator
Rebecca Front
Producer
Georgina Leslie
Director
Georgina Leslie
Executive Producer
Basil Comely

An intimate portrait of the last five years of David Bowie's life.

An intimate portrait of one of the defining artists of the 20th and early 21st centuries, told by the people who knew him best.

There was nothing predictable about David Bowie. Everything was designed to intrigue, to challenge, to defy all expectations. But perhaps no period in David Bowie's extraordinary career raised more fascination, more surprise, and more questions than the last five years. This is an intimate portrait of one of the defining artists of the 20th and early 21st centuries, told by the people who knew him best - his friends and artistic collaborators.

This film takes a detailed look at Bowie's last albums, The Next Day and Blackstar, and his play Lazarus. In his final five years, Bowie not only began producing music again, but returned to the core and defining themes of his career. This film explores how Bowie was a far more consistent artist than many interpretations of his career would have us believe. It traces the core themes from his final works and relates them to his incredible back catalogue. His urge to communicate feelings of spirituality, alienation and fame underpin his greatest works from the 1960s to 2016. This is what lies at the heart of his success and appeal - music that deals with what it means to be human in a way that goes far beyond the normal palette of a rock star.

The film is not a comprehensive overview of his entire career, but an in-depth exploration of pivotal moments that show how the themes, the narrative and the approach is consistent - it is simply the palette that changes. The film includes every key member of the Next Day band, the Blackstar band and those who worked with him on the stage play Lazarus. In addition, old friends and colleagues are on hand to explore how the work of the last five years relates to Bowie's back catalogue. And, as in David Bowie: Five Years, there is a wealth of unseen and rare archive footage.

Credits

Director
Francis Whately
Executive Producer
Phil Dolling

Radio 1's Screen Time

Rosamund Pike Interview Special: Radioactive

Rosamund Pike talks to Ali about the new Marie Curie biopic Radioactive.

Rosamund Pike stars in the new Marie Curie biopic Radioactive, and here she talks to Ali about the fascinating life of the world-changing French-Polish scientist. Somehow Thunderbirds also comes up, as does Gone Girl - which makes a bit more sense to be fair - as well as Pike's recent discovery of the wizarding world of Harry Potter...

New Creatives

Sensational Simmy

An imaginative and dramatic response to the question: What if I fall?

In this short specially shot drama, writer and filmmaker Runyararo Mapfumo explores the question: What if I fall? In an imaginative and dramatic response to this question, the film focuses on a champion runner, as she makes her way home late one night.

In collaboration with Google Arts & Culture

The remarkable true story of the woman behind the worldwide waxworks empire.

The story of the woman behind the worldwide waxworks empire, who travelled from France to England where she overcame the odds to establish her remarkable and enduring brand.

The remarkable true story of the woman behind the worldwide waxworks empire, Madame Tussaud.

In an astonishing life that spanned both the French and Industrial revolutions, this single mother and entrepreneur travelled across the Channel to England, where she overcame the odds to establish her remarkable and enduring brand. Determined to leave an account of who she was and the times she lived through, her memoirs, letters and papers offer a unique insight into the creation of the extraordinary empire which bears her name.

Credits

Director
Alain Brunard
Director
Nina Barbier
Producer
Stephane Milliere
Producer
Virginie Guibbaud
Production Company
Gedeon Programmes
Production Company
Arte France

A Good Read

Jonathan Coe and Gemma Cairney

Jonathan Coe and Gemma Cairney join Harriett Gilbert to recommend favourite books..

Harriett Gilbert is joined by comic novelist Jonathan Coe and Radio 1 DJ Gemma Cairney to recommend favourite books.

Harriett Gilbert is joined by comic novelist Jonathan Coe and Radio 1 DJ Gemma Cairney to recommend favourite books.

Jonathan's choice is the first part in a tragi-comic epic, 'The Complete Pratt',a semi-autobiographical novel by the late David Nobbs, creator of 'The Fall and Rise of Reginald Perrin'. It's called 'Second From Last in the Sack Race'.

Gemma chooses a novel by Laura Dockrill, a vividly imagined story of mermaids and pirates, 'Lorali'.

Harriett dusts off a novel from the 1940s by Nevil Shute, 'Pied Piper'. Its subject matter is sharply topical: an elderly man leads a growing group of refugee children across Europe, attempting to avoid the Nazi invaders.

Producer...Mary Ward-Lowery.

Credits

Presenter
Harriett Gilbert
Interviewed Guest
Krishnan Guru-Murthy
Interviewed Guest
Ann Cleeves

Brand

A Good Read

And the Academy Award Goes To...

Series 6 The Last Emperor

Paul Gambaccini explores the epic film that won all 9 Oscars it was nominated for in 1988.

Paul Gambaccini hears from the director, producer, cinematographer and composer of the epic which opened up the recent history of China to the west and swept the Oscars in 1988.

Paul Gambaccini returns with the series that takes a long hard look behind the scenes of three classic films which have scooped the Best Picture Award. He reports on the artistic, political and personal decisions that lie behind the winners, laced with some pretty good gossip too.

In Episode 1 Paul hears from the director, producer, cinematographer and composer of the epic which opened up the recent history of China to the West and swept the Oscars in 1988.

Producer: Marya Burgess.

A Good Read

Samantha Bond and Jason Cowley

Samantha Bond and Jason Cowley join Harriett Gilbert to discuss favourite books.

Actress Samantha Bond and editor of the New Statesman Jason Cowley join Harriett Gilbert to discuss favourite books, by Donna Tartt, Joseph Conrad and Hamid Ismailov.

Actress Samantha Bond and editor of The New Statesman Jason Cowley join Harriett Gilbert for some passionate conversation about favourite books.

Samantha Bond, star of 'Home Fires', 'Downton Abbey' and a one-time Miss Moneypenny, is also a voracious reader. Her choice is Donna Tartt's first novel, the best-selling 'A Secret History', a murder-mystery with a Vermont campus setting and an intriguing cast of characters.

Jason Cowley is credited with revitalising The New Statesman as its editor. He recommends 'The Secret Agent' by Joseph Conrad, a novel about a terrorist bomb-plot devised by a shady Soho shopkeeper who doubles as a spy for the Russians. The story was inspired by the death of a French anarchist who accidentally blew himself up while attempting to plant a bomb in Greenwich Park in 1894, and has, in its turn, inspired many adaptations since its publication in 1907.

Harriett's choice is 'The Dead Lake' by Hamid Ismailov, a haunting fairytale, with hints of Gunther Grass' 'The Tin Drum', about the impact of repeated atomic testing in Soviet-era Kazakhstan on the local people of the Steppes.

Producer...Mary Ward-Lowery.

Credits

Presenter
Harriett Gilbert
Interviewed Guest
Samantha Bond
Interviewed Guest
Jason Cowley
Producer
Mary Ward-Lowery

Brand

A Good Read

A Good Read

Sathnam Sanghera and Hadley Freeman

Sathnam Sanghera and Hadley Freeman talk favourite books with Harriett Gilbert.

Sathnam Sanghera and Hadley Freeman talk favourite books with Harriett Gilbert, including Spring by David Szalay and The Girls' Guide to Hunting and Fishing by Melissa Bank.

Hadley Freeman (Guardian columnist and author of Life Moves Pretty Fast: The Lessons We Learned from Eighties Movies and Be Awesome: Modern Life for Modern Ladies) and Sathnam Sanghera (Times columnist and author of Marriage Material and The Boy With The Topknot) talk favourite books with Harriett Gilbert. Choices include Spring by David Szalay, The Girls' Guide to Hunting and Fishing by Melissa Bank and A Cat, a Man, and Two Women by Junichiro Tanizaki.

Produced by Mair Bosworth.

Credits

Presenter
Harriett Gilbert
Interviewed Guest
Sathnam Sanghera
Interviewed Guest
Hadley Freeman
Producer
Mair Bosworth

Brand

A Good Read

A Good Read

Professor Mark Miodownik and Diana Henry

Mark Miodownik and Diana Henry tell presenter Harriett Gilbert about the books they love.

Scientist Mark Miodownik and food writer Diana Henry tell Harriett Gilbert about the books they love. Flann O'Brien, Elizabeth Taylor and chef Gabrielle Hamilton are the authors.

Materials engineer and presenter Mark Miodownik and Diana Henry, the food writer for the Sunday Telegraph, tell Harriett Gilbert about the books they love. Books tossed into the discussion are: The Third Policeman by Flann O'Brien, Blood, Bones & Butter: The Inadvertent Education of a Reluctant Chef by Gabrielle Hamilton and The Soul of Kindness by Elizabeth Taylor.

Producer Beth O'Dea.

Credits

Presenter
Harriett Gilbert
Interviewed Guest
Mark Miodownik
Interviewed Guest
Diana Henry
Producer
Beth O'Dea

Brand

A Good Read

A Good Read

Phill Jupitus and Candace Allen

Phill Jupitus and Candace Allen are Sue MacGregor's book discussion guests.

4 Extra Debut. Sue MacGregor, Phill Jupitus and Candace Allen discuss books by Raymond Chandler, Bessie Head and Elizabeth Hardwick. From September 2005.

4 Extra Debut.

Sue MacGregor and her guests - comedian, Phill Jupitus and writer, Candace Allen - discuss books by Bessie Head, Raymond Chandler and Elizabeth Hardwick. From September 2005.

When Rain Clouds Gather by Bessie Head

Publisher: Heinemann - African Writers

The Long Goodbye by Raymond Chandler

Publisher: Penguin

Sleepless Nights by Elizabeth Hardwick

Publisher: New York Review Books.

Brand

A Good Read

Laura Barton takes a close listen to the music of Cornwall.

Laura Barton takes a close listen to the music of one of Britain's long-isolated locations, Cornwall.

Laura Barton takes a close listen to the music of one of Britain's long-isolated locations, Cornwall.

The tradition of communal singing known as a Shout hasn't just survived in Cornwall. As Laura discovers in a pub outside Redruth, it's thriving. In a bar packed with young and old, songs about mining and fishing, in Cornish and English, compete with hymns and the occasional import from overseas, in high energy performances that define an oral tradition. None are sung more full-heartedly than Kerra Kernow, beloved Cornwall.

Laura talks with Hilary Coleman of the celebrated Cornish folk group Dalla about the qualities of the folk tradition in the Duchy and with two singer-songwriters. Florence MacDonald, who also teaches music in primary schools, describes what drew her back to Cornwall, and Ruarri Joseph, aka William the Conqueror, considers the balance he maintains between the demands of touring and the allure of the surf off Newquay and the woods and hills of his childhood home.

Produced by Alan Hall

A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4.

A Good Read

Deborah Bull and Sam Leith

Harriett Gilbert asks Deborah Bull and Sam Leith about the books they have always loved.

Harriett Gilbert asks former dancer Deborah Bull and journalist Sam Leith about the books they have always loved: a lesser-known Mervyn Peake and the poetry of John Berryman.

Deborah Bull, former Principal Dancer with the Royal Ballet, talks about her longstanding affection for Mr Pye by Mervyn Peake, an original and amusing tale set on Sark. Journalist and author Sam Leith, literary editor of The Spectator, advocates 77 Dream Songs by John Berryman, a collection of poetry he's passionate about. Presenter Harriett Gilbert's choice is News of a Kidnapping by Gabriel García Márquez, a non-fiction work detailing kidnappings in Colombia by the Medellín Cartel and Pablo Escobar.

Producer Beth O'Dea.

Credits

Presenter
Harriett Gilbert
Interviewed Guest
Deborah Bull
Interviewed Guest
Sam Leith
Producer
Beth O'Dea

Brand

A Good Read

A Good Read

Tony Parsons and Olly Mann

Tony Parsons and Olly Mann talk favourite books with Harriett Gilbert.

Tony Parsons and Olly Mann talk favourite books with Harriett Gilbert including Big Little Lies by Liane Moriarty and Never Mind by Edward St Aubyn.

Harriett Gilbert and guests talk favourite books, including Big Little Lies by Liane Moriarty, Never Mind by Edward St Aubyn (the first in his Patrick Melrose series) & The Phantom Tollbooth by Norton Juster. Her guests are the journalist and broadcaster Tony Parsons, who started his career at the NME and went on to write Man and Boy and later the bestselling DC Max Wolfe thriller series. And Olly Mann, presenter of award-winning podcasts and radio programmes including Answer Me This!, The Modern Mann and BBC Radio 4's The Male Room and Four Thought.

Producer: Mair Bosworth.

Credits

Presenter
Harriett Gilbert
Interviewed Guest
Tony Parsons
Interviewed Guest
Olly Mann
Producer
Mair Bosworth

Brand

A Good Read

Huey Morgan travels to New York to examine the enduring appeal of blind musician Moondog.

New Yorker Huey Morgan returns home to examine the life, work and enduring appeal of blind musician Moondog, who became a popular figure on the city's streets in the 1950s and 60s.

New Yorker Huey Morgan examines the life, work and enduring appeal of a musician known as Moondog who lived and worked on the city's streets in the 1950s and 60s.

Born Louis Thomas Hardin in Kansas in May 1916, he played musical instruments from an early age and lost his sight in an accident when he was 16. He went on to teach himself music and composition by ear, as well as music theory through books in braille.

In 1943, Moondog moved to New York where he soon became acquainted with Leonard Bernstein and Arturo Toscanini as well as jazz performers and composers like Charlie Parker and Benny Goodman.

In the late 1940s, he lived as a street musician, composer and poet on the streets of New York City and became known as The Viking of 6th Avenue because of his beard, long hair and attire which included a cloak and a Viking-style horned helmet.

Moondog's music would take inspiration from street sounds such as the New York subway and foghorns. His compositions were a combination of classical, traditional jazz and American vernacular. He became a pioneer with a unique attitude to composition and melody. He also invented instruments including a small triangular shaped harp known as the "oo" and the Trimba, a triangular percussion instrument.

Huey Morgan returns to his home city to learn more about Moondog, his life and his music. He discovers how Moondog went on to influence other musicians, including Phillip Glass, and how his work is continuing to be used and adapted to this day.

Huey is joined in New York by Moondog biographer Robert Scotto and poet and writer Magie Dominic who remembers meeting him in the 1960s. They take Huey to some of the places popular with Moondog, including Carnegie Hall and his regular pitch on 6th Avenue.

Huey hears from the Swedish musician Stefan Lakatos who befriended Moondog when he moved to Europe, from composer John Zorn, saxophonist and composer John Harle and classical pianist and composer Joanna McGregor.

The programme also includes rare recordings of Moondog speaking in the early 1980s.

A Made in Manchester production for BBC Radio 4.

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