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Woman's Hour

Cyntoia Brown-Long

BBC Radio 4
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44 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Cyntoia Brown-Long; Food writer, Sue Quinn; the final part of our PTSD series;

Cyntoia Brown-Long, imprisoned for life at 16, and released at 31; Food writer, Sue Quinn & her new book 'Cocoa'; the final part of our PTSD series;

In 2006 16 year old Cyntoia Brown was sentenced as an adult to life in prison for killing a man while she was a teenage sex trafficking victim. Granted clemency in January this year and released on August 7th she joins Jenni to discuss her childhood, what happened the day she shot Johnny Allen and the impact of 16 years in prison.

Food writer, Sue Quinn’s latest book ‘Cocoa: An exploration of chocolate, with recipes’ illustrates how the story of chocolate includes economics and slavery, sex and desire, society and culture. ‘Cocoa’ reveals a wealth of cultural, historical and culinary information about chocolate through the ages and across the world. She joins Jenni in the studio to Cook the Perfect…Gorgonzola, walnuts, rosemary and chocolate.

Over the past two years the charity Combat Stress has been running workshops across the country to help partners of veterans suffering from PTSD. But evidence suggests only a minority of partners seek support for themselves as there are many barriers to participation in workshops in the community especially if the veteran is undergoing treatment and isn’t well enough to be left. A new online programme has just been launched to address this - it’s the first of its kind in the UK and is designed to help partners who find it harder to leave the home due to carer roles, childcare and work pressures. In this final interview we hear from Elaine who was in the first cohort of the online treatment programme which finished in the summer. She’s been married for 31 years and her husband was in the military for 12 years and explains to reporter, Tamsin Smith how his PTSD dramatically worsened in 2015, almost three decades after he left the military service.

Presenter: Jenni Murray

Producer: Kirsty Starkey

Interviewed Guest: Cyntoia Brown-Long

Photographer: Flip Holsinger

Interviewed Guest: Sue Quinn

Reporter: Tamsin Smith

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Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

Cyntoia Long-Brown, Being Fat, Children and Climate Change

BBC Radio 4
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57 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Cyntoia Brown-Long on her 16 years in prison, being fat, children and climate change

Cyntoia Brown-Long tells us about the impact of 16 years in prison, your experience of being fat and the best way to talk to children about climate change.

In 2006, 16 year old Cyntoia Brown-Long was sentenced as an adult to life in prison for killing a man while she was a teenage sex trafficking victim. Granted clemency in January this year and released in August, she tells us about her childhood and the impact of 16 years in prison.

As same sex marriage becomes available in the new year in Northern Ireland, we hear from Grainne Close and Shannon Sickles, the first couple in the UK to get a civil partnership fifteen years ago.

The Danish comic and podcaster Sofie Hagen says she's 'a fat liberationist who wants to abolish the systemic discrimination and abuse fat people endure on a daily basis'. So what's your experience of being fat? We hear from the plus-size model Bischamber Das and from listeners Farah, Les, Jo and Karen.

The Oscar-winning American actress Regina King has been named as one of the most influential people of 2019. She tells us about her leading role in the drama Watchmen.

What's the best way to talk to children about climate change, and are schools doing enough to educate this new generation? Caroline Hickman, a climate change researcher at the University of Bath, the eco-activist Ella Man and Fiona Cowen, the pre-school climate change headteacher at Bolsover Infants discuss.

Presenter: Jenni Murray

Producer: Rabeka Nurmahomed

Editor: Siobhann Tighe

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Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

Maddy Prior, Family Therapy, Linda Boström Knausgård

BBC Radio 4
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41 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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The programme that offers a female perspective on the world

Here's Maddy Prior, photographed when All Round My Hat was in the charts in the '70s. She's been performing now for over 50 years and she's done more than 3000 shows. She's made 11 albums of her own and 28 with Steeleye Span. Maddy talks to Jenni about her life and music.

Last week we spoke to Cyntoia Brown-Long, who was given a life sentence in America for a murder she committed when she was 16. Today we speak to Jennifer Ubiera who is an attorney at the Georgetown Juvenile Justice Initiative in Washington DC. Her focus is young people in the criminal justice system, especially teenage girls and the poor. She explains how Cyntoia represents the young women she supports.

Linda Boström Knausgård is a Swedish writer whose second novel, Welcome To America, has been awarded the prestigious August Prize. It's about a sensitive, strong-willed child who's 11 and has stopped talking. She thinks she may have killed her father. Her brother barricades himself in his room. Their mother, a successful actress, carries on as normal. Linda Boström Knausgård talks about silence, trauma, childhood, mental illness and imploding families.

Nicola Dunn is a family therapist. She supports people who have genetic testing for medical conditions. Occasionally, perhaps more often than you think, these tests reveal that the man thought to be someone's Dad, turns out not to be. So what impact do these revelations have on the whole family? Woman’s Hour investigates.

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Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

Teen sex therapy. Surrogacy Laws. Classical monsters. Singer Lisa Simone.

BBC Radio 4
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48 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Teen sex therapy. Surrogacy law changes. Classical monsters. Singer Lisa Simone.

Why more teenagers than ever are seeking sex and relationship therapy. Surrogacy UK on why they want legal responsibility for surrogates to end at birth and singer Lisa Simone.

The NHS have reported that 1 in 10 people seeking sex and relationship therapy are teenagers – up from 1 in 30 two years ago. So what’s changed? We look at the issues that young people are bringing to the therapy room, the impact of porn and social media, and why teenagers are more willing to talk to adults about sex.

We look at why the charity Surrogacy UK is calling for the surrogate’s legal responsibility to end at birth.

Plus from car adverts to cartoons, film and sci-fi - the appeal of classical monsters in our popular culture. And the singer, composer and actor Lisa Simone talks about her latest album ‘In Need of Love’.

Presenter Jane Garvey

Producer Beverley Purcell

Guest Miranda Christophers

Guest Rachel Fitzsimons

Guest Dr Elizabeth Gloyn

Guest Natalie Smith

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Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

Brexit: Deadlock and Compromise, Jenny Downham, Inducing Late Babies

BBC Radio 4
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48 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Are women politicians brokering a compromise, a way out of the deadlock at Westminster?

Are women politicians brokering a compromise, a way out of the deadlock at Westminster plus a look at the four female candidates vying for the position of Speaker.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson has so far failed to get Parliament’s backing for his Withdrawal Agreement Bill and he won’t meet the October 31st deadline to leave the EU. MPs have also, so far, declined to back plans for the General Election that he wants. The leaders of two parties, Nicola Sturgeon of the SNP and Jo Swinson of the Lib Dems, presented a plan for an election at the weekend. So, are women politicians brokering a compromise, a way out of the deadlock at Westminster, or is each furthering the interests of their own party? And as the House of Commons prepares to elect a new speaker on Monday, with four female candidates in the running we ask what difference a female speaker could make to our political culture?

Jenny Downham writes international bestselling novels including Before I Die and Unbecoming. Her fourth novel, Furious Thing, is about a 15-year-old girl called Lexi. Lexi wants her step-father to accept her, her mother to love her like she used to, and her step-brother to declare his desire to spend the rest of his life with her. She tries to push the fury down but it simmers below the surface waiting to erupt. Why is Lexi so angry?

Recent Swedish research into how long pregnant women could be left after their due dates was abandoned last year when six of the babies died. So what is the situation here in the UK? Why do we have steadily increasing induction rates? Are we risk averse or necessarily careful in protecting mother and baby? Jane speaks to Andrew Weeks, Professor of International Maternal Health Care at the University of Liverpool.

The untold stories of five of the women of Pre-Raphaelite art whose contribution has been overlooked. Today, Maria Zambaco and her sculpted medallions.

Presenter: Jane Garvey

Interviewed guest: Helen Lewis

Interviewed guest: Katy Balls

Interviewed guest: Jenny Downham

Interviewed guest: Professor Andrew Weeks

Interviewed guest: Dr Jan Marsh

Interviewed guest: Dr Alison Smith

Producer: Lucinda Montefiore

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Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

Getting in and getting on in the music industry

BBC Radio 4
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43 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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How young women can forge a career in music - broadcast from BBC Music Introducing Live.

We discuss how young women can get in and get on in the music industry in a special programme broadcast from BBC Music Introducing Live, from Tobacco Dock in London.

How can young women get in and get on in the music industry? In a special programme, broadcast from BBC Music Introducing Live at Tobacco Dock in London, we discuss how to forge a career in popular music - the need to increase the number of women, careers advice, the challenges that have to be tackled, and what BBC Introducing is doing to help. With live music from singer-songwriter Maisie Peters and a panel of industry figures: Emma Banks, Carla Marie Williams, Rhiannon Mair, Abbie McCarthy, and Maxie Gedge.

Presenter: Jane Garvey

Producer: Emma Wallace

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Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

Horror films, Women's FA, Teen pregnancy, MPs standing down

BBC Radio 4
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49 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Women's FA, the women making horror films, teen pregnancy, the women MPs standing down.

This edition looks at women making horror films, the Women's FA 50 years on, teen pregnancy, and the women MPs standing down ahead of the December general election.

On Halloween we ask where are the women in the horror film industry? How much do women create and view horror differently and who are the women film-makers to look out for? Jane is joined by Aislinn Clarke, the writer-director of ‘The Devil's Doorway’, Lizzie Franke, production executive at the BFI and Anna Bogutskaya, co-founder of The Final Girls, a film collective exploring the intersections of horror films and feminism. So far seventeen women MPs have announced they'll be standing down and not standing in the general election. Newsnight's Katie Razzall joins us to look at the significance of prominent female politicians such as Amber Rudd, Nicky Morgan and Gloria De Piero standing down. It's 50 years since the Women’s FA was created in 1969, officially reviving women's football for the first time since it was banned it in 1921. We speak to Patricia Gregory, one of the players who was instrumental in founding the WFA and reversing the ban, about how they did it - and to Eniola Aluko, who has played over 100 times for England, to reflect on where the women’s game stands today and what the the FA has done for women's football since they regained control in the 1990s. And, teenage pregnancy rates have been falling in the UK and are now at the lowest level since records began in the 1960s but it continues to have one of the highest teenage birth rates in Western Europe. Pregnant Teens is a new BBC podcast that follows three girls Nicole, Megan and Robyn through their pregnancies in Middlesbrough, a town that is bucking the trend - with the highest rate of teenage pregnancy in England and Wales. Jane looks at the realities of young motherhood with Dr Kim Jamie, Assistant Professor in Sociology at the University of Durham and young mum Chyna Powell-Henry.

Presenter: Jane Garvey

Producer: Ruth Watts

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Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

Elizabeth McGovern, Trump's visit to D-Day: Decoding state ceremony

BBC Radio 4
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46 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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From President Trump’s state visit to D-Day celebrations, we reflect on a week of ceremony

Elizabeth McGovern interviewed live. And from President Trump’s state visit to D-Day celebrations, we reflect on a week of ceremony.

Elizabeth McGovern, best known in the UK for being Lady Cora in Downton Abbey is in a play in London at the moment called Starry Messenger. Elizabeth plays the wife of a man going through a mid-life crisis. Plus the latest Sadie and the Hotheads news.

From President Trump’s state visit to D-Day celebrations, we reflect on a week of ceremony with Jess Brammar Executive Editor, HuffPost UK, Sarah Elliot Chair of Republicans Overseas UK, and Bonnie Greer, columnist with the New European newspaper, playwright and critic.

We continue our look at women sports coaches as part of coaching week with tennis coach, Francesca Lewis. She fell in love with the game when she was just 8 years old, and she went on to compete in tournaments right across the world. But it was as a tennis coach, rather than a player, that Francesca really found her calling. She now trains some of the best junior players in the world at Swansea’s Regional Player Development Centre.

Presenter: Jenni Murray

Producer: Helen Fitzhenry

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Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

Elif Shafak, Women Chelsea Pensioners, Sports Coaching

BBC Radio 4
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45 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Elif Shafak, women Chelsea pensioners, getting into sports coaching and modern slavery.

Turkish writer Elif Shafak; on the 75th anniversary of D-Day, we hear from a female Chelsea pensioner; how to get into sports coaching; and what is being done for modern slaves?

Turkish writer Elif Safak’s latest novel '10 Minutes 38 Seconds In This Strange World' tells the story of Leila, a woman whose body has died, but whose mind has a precious ten minutes to reflect on the joy, pain and injustice of her life as a prostitute in Istanbul. Jenni talks to her about tackling controversial subjects and being accused of obscenity. Chelsea Pensioners are well known by the bright red military coats with gold buttons that they must wear when they go out in public. In return for their army pension, 300 residents live at the Royal Hospital cost free - and today they welcome ex-servicewomen. We hear from Chelsea Pensioner Helen Andrews, who served during the Second World War at Bletchley Park as Private Maria Teresa Helen McQuibban, with the Royal Corps of Signals. To celebrate UK Coaching Week Louisa Arnold tells us about Project 500 - a scheme to inspire and support women to become sports coaches - and Kim Johnson explains why she loves being a rugby coach. And, this week’s Woman’s Hour drama, I’m A Slave, has been showing the misery of human trafficking and modern slavery in the UK today. But, how much is this a female problem? To discuss how it affects women and the work being done to help them, Jenni is joined by the Salvation Army’s Anti-Trafficking and Modern Slavery Operations Manager, Emilie Martin.

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Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

Eve Ensler, Dress codes at work, Women's sexual desires

BBC Radio 4
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57 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Eve Ensler on her new book The Apology. Dress codes at work. Myths about sexual desire

Eve Ensler on why she's written her new book The Apology. Can having a dress code at work affect productivity? Kimberle Crenshaw on intersectionality. Changing ideas about women's sexual desires

The playwright and activist Eve Ensler talks about her book The Apology an imagined letter from her father apologising to her for sexual, physical and emotional abuse.

Does what you wear to work matter? We discuss exactly who determines work dress codes with the brand and image consultant Isabel Spearman, Helen McCarthy – who lectures in early modern history at Cambridge University, Magdalene Abraha, the group editorial manager at a publishing company, Lindsey Bauer who’s is a teacher at Colyton Grammar school in Devon, Viv Groskop the comedian, writer and author of How to Own the Room: Women and the Art of Brilliant Speaking, and Uma Creswell who runs her own business and is vice president of the City Women Network.

As the final series of Mum airs on BBC2 – we examine the character Pauline and ask why so many British sit coms and novels centre around women who are obsessed with status. We hear from critic and journalist Alex Clark and from Julia Raeside the broadcaster and television critic.

We discuss myths about sexual desire: why do so many women want more pleasure and how do they get it? Dr Wednesday Martin is the author of Untrue: why nearly everything we believe about women and lust and infidelity is untrue and how the new science can set us free. Fran Bushe is a playwright and comedian with a show called Ad Libido.

Professor Kimberle Crenshaw talks about the term intersectionality: why she first used it in 1989 and its continued importance today.

What’s it like coming out to your parents? We hear from Amelia Abraham the author of Queer Limitations, from Riyadh Khalaf who's written Yay! You’re Gay! Now What? and from Amelia's stepmum Tessa.

Why has the white plimsoll become such a desirable piece of footwear? Hannah Rochelle the author of En Brogue and Dr Thomas Turner the author of The Sports Shoe – A History from Field to Fashion tell us more.

Presented by Jenni Murray

Produced by Rabeka Nurmahomed

Edited by Jane Thurlow

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Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

Juno Dawson, Sport Coaches, Frances Ryan

BBC Radio 4
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49 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

The programme that offers a female perspective on the world

Juno Dawson’s latest novel is called Meat Market. It's inspired by her time working in fashion and being in contact with models, editors and agents. It's a story about young girls seduced by money and images of perfection but vulnerable to predators, exploitation and ill health. Juno speaks to Jane about writing Meat Market and her hopes for the fashion industry.

This week we’re celebrating women sport coaches. Today we hear from Gemma Lumsdaine who's a wheelchair basketball coach at Dundee Dragons Club. She tells us about the benefits of sport and the confidence that coaching gives her.

The journalist and campaigner Frances Ryan says austerity has led to the ‘demonization of disabled people’ especially disabled women. Disabled women and mothers, she says, are more likely to be unemployed, rely on benefits, to be abused, raped, and have their children taken from them. She says austerity has both caused and increased their problems. Frances explains to Jane why she believes austerity has harmed those women most in need. Her book, Crippled: Austerity And the Demonization of Disabled People has just been published by Verso.

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Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

Women's Football, Nicola Benedetti

BBC Radio 4
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48 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

How women's football is changing. Nicola Benedetti on music education for all.

How has women's football changed since M&S v Woolworths at Kenilworth Road? We look ahead to the FIFA Women's World Cup. WH Power List No18, Nicola Benedetti on music education.

We look ahead to the Women’s Football World Cup in France with former England, Chelsea and West Ham player Claire Rafferty and BBC Women’s Sports Reporter, Jo Currie. Who are the teams and players we should be looking out for? We also discuss the history of women’s football in the UK and around the world with Gemma Clarke, author of author of Soccer Women and Natasha Rolt who’s Schools Heritage Officer for Luton Town FC Community Trust. What progress has been made since the FA banned women’s matches in 1921 – and how are coverage and attitudes changing?

The Fawcett Society will be joining protests in Trafalgar Square today. Donald Trump is making his state visit to the UK. Those women protesting are concerned about his record on women’s rights and don’t want the UK government to honour him. But not all women agree with them – many are concerned about respecting the special relationship. We hear the arguments for protesting and whether it is the best way of prioritising women’s rights. We discuss with Sam Smethers, CEO of the Fawcett Society and Assistant Comment Editor at the Daily Telegraph, Madeline Grant.

Violinist Nicola Benedetti was placed 18th on the Woman’s Hour Power List 2018. Chosen for being “a fabulous spokesperson who’s devoted so much time and energy to supporting music education for all” in the past 12 months she has worked with over 2,000 students and 500 teachers, she’s also launched her own online series of educational videos and received a CBE. Jane talks to her about her achievements and her new album Nicola Benedetti and Wynton Marsalis’ Violin Concerto & Fiddle Dance Suite.

Presented by Jane Garvey

Produced by Jane Thurlow

Interviewed guest: Nicola Benedetti

Interviewed guest: Claire Rafferty

Interviewed guest: Gemma Clarke

Interviewed guest: Natasha Rolt

Interviewed guest: Sam Smethers

Interviewed guest: Madeline Grant

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Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

Wife, Francesca Segal on premature babies, Love Island

BBC Radio 4
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44 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

A queer history of the word 'wife' and Francesca Segal on the birth of her premature twins

Author Francesca Segal tells Jenni about her time in neonatal intensive care with her premature twin daughters. And Love Island is back, but is it more inclusive this year?

After her identical twin girls were born prematurely at 30 weeks, writer and journalist Francesca Segal found herself sitting in what she called the “mother ship” of neonatal intensive care, all her expectations of parenthood shattered. She speaks to Jenni about the diary she kept and about the band of mothers who joined her in the Mother Ship – which is the title of her memoir of the 56 days spent with her daughters in hospital.

Inspired by Henrik Ibsen’s A Doll’s House, new play Wife focuses on a married woman facing a sexual identity crisis in 1959 in order to explore what we have meant by the word ‘wife’ over 90 years. Set in 1959, 1988, 2019 and 2042 the play follows four queer stories within four generations of one family and it highlights the changes within the institution of marriage. Jenni talks to director Indhu Rubasingham and historian Dr Rebecca Jennings.

This year's Love Island producers have introduced changes to make the hit TV programme more inclusive, and Monday’s launch revealed the new line-up. Do the changes go far enough? Jenni is joined by journalist Habiba Katsha, and by make-up artist Frances Shillito.

Today is the start of a judicial review into women’s pensions. A group called BACK TO 60 is behind the court action. They want women’s state pensions to start at 60, as it did until 2010. It’s been rising ever since and is set to go up to 67 by 2028. Jenni talks to Davina Lloyd.

Presenter: Jenni Murray

Producer: Laura Northedge

Interviewed Guest: Francesca Segal

Interviewed Guest: Indhu Rubasingham

Interviewed Guest: Rebecca Jennings

Interviewed Guest: Habiba Katsha

Interviewed Guest: Frances Shillito

Interviewed Guest: Davina Lloyd

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Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

Weekend Woman's Hour: Women's Football World Cup, the word Wife, Chelsea Pensioner Helen Andrews

BBC Radio 4
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57 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:

Women's Football World Cup, new play Wife, and Chelsea Pensioner Helen Andrews.

Women's Football World Cup, the meaning of the word wife, Chelsea Pensioner Helen Andrews and her experiences at Bletchley

We look ahead to the Women’s Football World Cup in France with former England, Chelsea and West Ham player Claire Rafferty, BBC Women’s Sports reporter Jo Currie and Gemma Clarke author of Soccer Women: the Icons, Rebels, Starts and Trailblazers Who Transformed the Beautiful Game.

The author Elif Shafak tells us about her latest novel 10 minutes 38 seconds In This Strange World.

The Violinist Nicola Bennedetti talks about her new album a collaboration with the jazz legend Wynton Marsalis.

The writer and journalist Francesca Segal tells us about her identical twin daughters born prematurely at 30 weeks and how her expectations of motherhood were shattered by their early arrival.

As part of coaching week talk to Louisa Arnold and Kim Johnson about Project 500, a scheme to inspire and support women to become sports coaches.

We hear about a new play Wife which explores the meaning of the word wife over 90 years with the director Indhu Rubasingham and Dr Rebecca Jennings lecturer in modern gender history at UCL.

As we mark D Day this week we hear from Chelsea Pensioner Helen Andrews one of thousands of women who volunteered for the British Army at Bletchley Park during the Second World War.

Presented by Jenni Murray

Producer: Rabeka Nurmahomed

Editor: Eleanor Garland

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Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

Arundhati Roy, Returning to work, Treatment after smears

BBC Radio 4
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53 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

The programme that offers a female perspective on the world

Arundhati Roy won the Booker Prize for Fiction in 1997 with The God of Small Things. It was followed up twenty years later with Ministry of Utmost Happiness. Now she has just published My Seditious Heart, a collection of political essays written in the two decades between those novels. She had a lot of praise for the essays but also a lot of criticism for challenging subjects like the acquisition of land, environmental degradation, government elites and the impact on the poorest and most marginalised people in India.

How easy has it been for you to get back into work after a long time away? Did you apply for hundreds of jobs before getting one? Were you able to return to what you wanted to do? We hear from two women who struggled. They are Tontschy Gerig and Emma Land.

A cervical cancer charity says we don’t always know that treatments for abnormal smear tests can have side effects. Jo’s Cervical Cancer Trust says some women experience bleeding, pain and even lose interest in sex after going for follow up procedures. They conducted a small survey and found that 1 in 5 women said that no one discussed side effects with them.

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Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

Nanogirl, Tory leadership, Kenya sex law, Emilie Pine

BBC Radio 4
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41 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Notes to Self; Kitchen Science Cookbook; being gay in Kenya; Conservative candidates

Will the UK see its third female prime minister? Kenya law bans gay sex, Emilie Pine on Notes to Self, and Dr Michelle Dickinson on writing a children's cookbook that teaches science.

We look at the prospects for the two women in the race for the Conservative Party leadership. Is there a chance the UK may see its third female Prime Minister? We hear from Rachel Sylvester, the award winning journalist who has interviewed them both and from Jessica Elgot, chief political correspondent for the Guardian about the view from the parliamentary lobby as MPs make their minds up ahead of the first ballot on Thursday.

You don’t need qualifications to teach your children about science. The science blogger Nanogirl, aka Dr Michelle Dickinson, who set up a nanomechanical testing lab in New Zealand has created a cookbook to teach children about cooking and science at the same time. Michelle talks about the significance of nanotechnology and easy ways for non-scientific parents to get their children into it.

Emilie Pine, an associate professor at University College, Dublin has written her first non-academic book, Notes to Self, a collection of essays about what it is to be a woman. She talks to Jenni about the taboo subjects she explores including infertility, miscarriage, menstruation and the effects of alcoholism in a family.

Kenya's High Court has ruled against campaigners seeking to overturn a law banning gay sex. Gay sex in Kenya is punishable by up to 14 years in prison, although it is not clear whether there have ever been any convictions. Two women talk about the impact of this ruling on them and other queer women in Kenya.

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Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

Women obsessed with women, Hannah Arendt, CPS challenge

BBC Radio 4
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46 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Women obsessed with women, Hannah Arendt, CPS challenge,

Killing Eve: women obsessed with women; Hannah Arendt: a look at the resurgence of interest in her work; and the planned challenge to the CPS for dropping rape cases.

With the second series of the BBC's Killing Eve underway, Villanelle and Eve continue their obsession with each other. We discuss why the obsession women have for other women has become such a familiar dramatic theme – from Mrs Danvers in Rebecca, to Notes on a Scandal - with writer, Joanna Briscoe and journalist, Sirin Kale. We examine what is behind the resurgence in popularity of twentieth century political thinker, Hannah Arendt and The Origins of Totalitarianism with Professor Lyndsey Stonebridge. Why do so many feel her writing chimes with contemporary politics? And we look at why a number of women’s groups are planning to launch a legal action against the Crown Prosecution Service, saying it’s failing to prosecute cases of rape. We hear from Rachel Krys, one of the founders of End Violence Against women, and two women whose cases were dropped.

Presenter: Jenni Murray

Producer: Ruth Watts

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Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

Food writer Jack Monroe

BBC Radio 4
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52 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Jack Monroe, Jennifer Nansubuga Makumbi, and pelvic floor exercises.

Food writer Jack Monroe, author Jennifer Nansubuga Makumbi, and what is the right way to do pelvic floor exercises?

Food writer and anti-poverty campaigner Jack Monroe’s new book ‘Tin Can Cook’ is filled with recipes made from tinned ingredients that can be bought from corner shops and supermarkets. An outspoken voice on poverty in the UK – her mission is to help people eat delicious food on a tight budget. She joins Jane in the studio to Cook the Perfect…Cannellini Beurre Blanc.

Today Radio 1 Newsbeat will be broadcasting a 15 minute radio special about sex abuse in the music industry and the young female music fans and musicians being taken advantage of. We hear clips of young women talking about what they’ve suffered and a record company exec on what his label is trying to do about it. And to discuss the extent and nature of the problem, why it’s happening despite #metoo, and what needs to be done, Naomi Pohl, Deputy General Secretary of the Musicians’ Union discusses.

Have we been doing pelvic floor exercises wrong? Can you ever do too many? And when should you really start doing them? We try to get to the bottom of the pelvic floor… We talk to Louise Kenyon, a Pilates instructor and Jane Simpson, a Continence Nurse Specialist who has written The Pelvic Floor Bible.

Ugandan writer Jennifer Nansubuga Makumbi discusses her new book Manchester Happened, a collection of short stories including 'Let's Tell This Story Properly', which won the Commonwealth Short Story prize.

Presenter: Jane Garvey

Producer: Kirsty Starkey

Interviewed Guest: Jack Monroe

Interviewed Guest: Naomi Pohl

Interviewed Guest: Louise Kenyon

Interviewed Guest: Jane Simpson

Interviewed Guest: Jennifer Nansubuga Makumbi

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Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

Misogyny online, The week’s news, Talking about turn-ons

BBC Radio 4
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49 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Is the threat of abuse silencing women online?

We ask if the threat of abuse is silencing women online, and who we should hold responsible. And we talk to the creators of Hotter: a show that asks people what turns them on.

As new data shows just how many women are silenced by the threat of abuse online, we ask what is being done to make women feel safer on social media. And who is responsible for monitoring abusive content? Jane talks to Hannah Bardell MP, Leigh Hopwood, Chair of the Chartered Institute of Marketing and to Isobel Asher Hamilton, Tech reporter at Business Insider.

We discuss the news stories of the week - the elimination of the only two women in the Conservative leadership content, Esther v Lorraine and why the media loves to pit women against one another, the next John Lewis boss, and new Nike mannequins.

Ell Potter and Mary Higgins’ sell-out show Hotter talks about what gets you hot. Creators and ex-girlfriends Ell and Mary talk about discussing the ins and outs of their relationship with a room full of people, and bringing up masturbation with a 97 year old.

Presenter: Jane Garvey

Producer: Helen Fitzhenry

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Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

Women obsessed with women, Returning to work, Jack Monroe

BBC Radio 4
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56 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Women obsessed with women. Job hunting in later life. Cannellini Beurre Blanc.

Why we enjoy watching women obsessed with women. The difficulties of finding a job after a long time out of the workplace. Food writer Jack Monroe on cooking good meals from tins.

What's the fascination with films books and television programmes like Killing Eve where the story centres on women obsessed with other women? Author Joanna Briscoe and journalist Sirin Kale discuss.

We hear why a UK wide coalition of women’s organisations, represented by the Centre for Women’s Justice, has begun legal action against the Crown Prosecution Service claiming that rape cases are being dropped because of a change in policy and practice. Beth and Gina tell us what happened to them and Rachel Krys the co-founder of End Violence Against Women tells us what the coalition is hoping to achieve.

Food writer Jack Monroe Cooks the Perfect....Cannellini Beurre Blanc.

Emma Land and Tontschy Gerig tell us how the struggled to find work after a long period off.

The Booker Prize winner for fiction Arundhati Roy tells us about her new book of political essays focusing on environmental degradation, government elites and the impact on the poorest and most marginalised people in India.

Ell Potter and Mary Higgins tell us about their theatre show Hotter.

Presented by Jane Garvey

Produced by Rabeka Nurmahomed

Edited by Jane Thurlow

Genre

Brand

Woman's Hour

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