Showing results for your search filters

Witness History

16/10/2015 07:50 GMT: The October Crisis in Canada

BBC World Service
BBC World Service logo
9 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

When Quebec separatists started to use violence - Canada's government called out the army

When French-speaking separatists in the Canadian province of Quebec turned violent, Canada's government called the army onto the streets.

When French-speaking separatists in the Canadian province of Quebec turned violent, Canada's government called the army onto the streets. Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau suspended basic civil rights and a stand-off ensued.

(Photo: A soldier guarding a street corner in Montreal in October 1970. Credit: Associated Press)

Genre

Witness History

29/10/2015 00:20 GMT: The Great Depression: Harry Leslie Smith Remembers

BBC World Service
BBC World Service logo
9 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Harry Leslie Smith grew up in England during the Great Depression of the 1930s

In October 1929, Wall Street crashed and the worst depression the world had ever seen began. Harry Leslie Smith grew up in poverty in England during that time.

In October 1929, Wall Street crashed and the greatest depression the world had ever seen began. Harry Leslie Smith tells Witness his story of growing up in extreme poverty in the north of England, and how his sister died of TB in a workhouse infirmary, too poor for proper medical care.

Photo: unemployed men queue for work at a dockyard during the Great Depression (Credit:Fox Photos/Getty Images)

Genre

The Making of Modern Medicine

Episode 1: Hot, Cold, Wet and Dry

BBC Radio 4
BBC Radio 4 logo
15 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:

Origins of religious and western-learned medicine can be traced to Hippocrates and Galen.

Hippocrates and Galen's writings and pithy pieces of advice for the aspiring physician in ancient Greece remained the basis for medical practice well into the 18th century.

The Long View

Overstretched Generals

BBC Radio 4
BBC Radio 4 logo
30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Jonathan Freedland compares past and present military campaigns.

Are concerns voiced by current military commanders matched by the difficulties encountered by Lord Wellington two centuries ago in the Peninsular Wars? With Jonathan Freedland.

The Making of Modern Medicine

Episode 2: God's House, the hospital

BBC Radio 4
BBC Radio 4 logo
15 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:

The hospital is one of the main innovations made in Christian Medieval times.

Aside from the universities to educate physicians, the hospital is one of the main innovations made in Christian Medieval times that persist into modern medicine.

The Making of Modern Medicine

Episode 3: The first sexual epidemic

BBC Radio 4
BBC Radio 4 logo
15 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:

A mysterious new disease broke out among the French army in 1492.

A mysterious new disease broke out among the French army in 1492, terrifying everyone and sparing no one.

By 1490, the population of Europe had recovered to the level it had been at when the Great Plague had killed up to one in three people across the continent. But a mysterious new disease broke out among the French army in 1492, terrifying everyone and sparing no one.

New mores of sexual behaviour that emerged during the late medieval period would mean that this epidemic of the pox would not be the last. How did the medical medieval practitioners enact cures and preventions - and what were the beliefs behind so-called miracle treatments?

The readers are David Rintoul, Peter Capaldi and Scott Handy.

The Making of Modern Medicine

Episode 4: Paracelsus and the people's medicine

BBC Radio 4
BBC Radio 4 logo
15 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:

The 16th century witnessed the birth of a new kind of natural philosophy and medicine.

The 16th century witnessed the birth of a new kind of natural philosophy and medicine under its chief advocate, Swiss medical reformer Paracelsus.

A major narrative history series exploring over 2,000 years of western medicine, written and presented by medical historian Andrew Cunningham.

The 16th century witnessed the birth of a new kind of natural philosophy and medicine. Its chief advocate, Swiss medical reformer Paracelsus, rejected the traditional medicine of the Greeks because of its heathen roots in favour of both a spiritual and alchemical approach.

This captivating figure and scourge of the medical establishment clashed with the authorities wherever he went yet, as we hear, became hailed for his innovative use of chemical drugs.

The readers are David Rintoul, Peter Capaldi, Jason Watkins and Scott Handy.

The Making of Modern Medicine

Episode 5: The Anatomical Renaissance

BBC Radio 4
BBC Radio 4 logo
15 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:

In the 16th century, surgery had been perfected to allow artificial noses, ears and lips.

Thanks to a renaissance in anatomy in the 16th century, the art of surgery had been perfected in Bologna to the extent artificial but living noses, ears and lips could be supplied.

A major narrative history series exploring over 2,000 years of western medicine, written and presented by medical historian Andrew Cunningham.

Noses, ears and lips were often lost during swordfights in defence of honour. Yet thanks to a renaissance in anatomy during the 16th century, the art of surgery had been perfected in Bologna to the extent that artificial but living noses, ears and lips could be supplied in their place.

The rediscovery of Galen's ancient book The Method of Healing, and a new generation of emerging anatomists in the mid 1500s, such as the young physician Andreas Vesalius, meant that the approach to human anatomy and good surgery would be completely reinvented.

The readers are David Rintoul, Peter Capaldi, Jason Watkins and Scott Handy.

Making History

02/06/2009

BBC Radio 4
BBC Radio 4 logo
30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Vanessa Collingridge presents the series exploring ordinary people's links with the past.

Document

Kenya's Bloody Summer

BBC Radio 4
BBC Radio 4 logo
30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:

A tale of murder and cover-up by the British Army in Kenya 50 years ago.

Brand

Document

Document

Episode 2: A Laudable Invasion?

BBC Radio 4
BBC Radio 4 logo
30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:

Series using documentary evidence to throw new light on past events.

The Laudabiliter was a papal letter which for 800 years became the legal precedent for English occupation of Ireland. The story of a flawed dossier and an unlawful invasion.

The story of a flawed dossier and an unlawful invasion. The Laudabiliter was a papal letter which for 800 years became the legal precedent for English occupation of Ireland.

Brand

Document

Document

A Date with Bevin

BBC Radio 4
BBC Radio 4 logo
30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:

Series using documentary evidence to throw new light on past events.

In 1946, the British Secret Service was concerned about a plot by Jewish terrorists to assassinate the Foreign Secretary Ernest Bevin. Mike Thomson investigates.

Brand

Document
BBC Radio 4
BBC Radio 4 logo
30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

John Tusa chronicles the making of modern Iran.

John Tusa presents the first of three programmes chronicling the making of modern Iran. He talks to academics, statesmen and eye-witnesses, revisiting a turbulent century.

John Tusa presents the first of three programmes chronicling the making of modern Iran. He talks to academics, statesmen and eye-witnesses, revisiting a turbulent century which began with the cultural revolution of 1906.

BBC Radio 4
BBC Radio 4 logo
30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

The oil crisis of the 1950s led to the overthrow of a democratically elected government.

John Tusa presents the second of three programmes chronicling the making of modern Iran. The oil crisis of the 1950s led to the overthrow of a democratically elected government.

John Tusa presents the second of three programmes chronicling the making of modern Iran. The oil crisis of the 1950s led to the overthrow of a democratically elected government, with British and American assistance.

BBC Radio 4
BBC Radio 4 logo
30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

The fall of the Shah led to the creation of the world's first Islamic republic.

John Tusa presents the last of three programmes chronicling the making of modern Iran. The fall of the Shah led to the creation of the world's first Islamic republic.

John Tusa presents the last of three programmes chronicling the making of modern Iran. The fall of the Shah and the unstoppable rise of Ayatollah Khomeini led to the creation of the world's first Islamic republic. How has the nation adjusted to rule by clerics?

Things We Forgot to Remember

Series 2 Episode 1: Jack the Ripper

BBC Radio 4
BBC Radio 4 logo
30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:

Michael Portillo investigates the fear Londoners felt in the late 1880s.

Michael Portillo investigates the fear Londoners felt in the late 1880s - not because of one man, but rather the catastrophic collapse of a whole way of life.

Things We Forgot to Remember

Series 2 Episode 2: First World War

BBC Radio 4
BBC Radio 4 logo
30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:

Michael tells the story of battles fought in the last 100 days of the war.

Michael tells the story of battles fought in the last 100 days of the war and explores how British forces progressed from the slaughter of the Somme to the victories of 1918.

Witness History

The Death of Quentin Crisp

BBC World Service
BBC World Service logo
10 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:

The flamboyant gay author of The Naked Civil Servant died on 21 November, 1999

The flamboyant and eccentric gay writer and raconteur died on November 21st 1999. He was on a visit to England from his home in New York - a city that he loved.

The flamboyant and eccentric gay writer and raconteur died on 21 November, 1999. He was on a visit to England from his home in New York - a city that he loved. Hear from his biographer Tim Fountain, about the man who became a celebrity after his memoir The Naked Civil Servant became a bestseller.

Photo:Quentin Crisp in 1980. Copyright: BBC.

Genre

Witness History

11/11/2015 00:20 GMT: Romany: Pioneer Wildlife Broadcaster

BBC World Service
BBC World Service logo
9 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Romany of the BBC was a pioneer naturalist broadcaster of Roma Gypsy origin

Romany of the BBC was a pioneer naturalist broadcaster of Roma Gypsy origin. His programmes were popular in the 1930s-40s. Photo: Romany with his dog Raq. From the family archive

Romany of the BBC was a pioneer naturalist broadcaster of Roma Gypsy origin. His programmes were popular in the UK in the 1930s and 40s. Dina Newman explores his life and his work.

Photo: Romany and his spaniel Raq. From the family archive

Genre

BBC World Service
BBC World Service logo
55 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

How World War One killed the ancient idea of heroism

How did World War One destroy the ancient idea of heroism? Amanda Vickery explores valour and panache with experts and an audience at Les Invalides, Paris.

"The first virtue in a soldier is endurance of fatigue; courage is only the second virtue" said Napoleon. Life in the trenches during the war, amongst rats, mud, shelling, barbed wire and unprecedented numbers of dead, called upon new reserves of both. But what did the war do to the ancient idea of heroism? With death, degradation and grief on such an unprecedented scale how did the concepts of duty, sacrifice and honour survive? At Napoleon's last resting place, the Hôtel National des Invalides, on the centenary of the outbreak of the first industrialised war, Amanda Vickery, her guests and audience explore heroism and World War One. With more women entering the work place than ever before, did the war redefine what it meant to be a man as well as a woman?

She is joined by André Loez, Sciences Po Paris and Emmanuelle Cronier, University of Picardie, and professor of literature Laurence Campa from L'université de Paris Ouest Nanterre and an audience in Paris. Christian Carion, joins them to explore the Christmas Truce - the subject of his Oscar-nominated film Joyeux Noël - in an essay on courage selected by our partners the British Council. It marks the centenary of the spontaneous ceasefire which took place across the Western Front at Christmas 1914.

(Photo: An undated archive picture shows French soldiers moving a 95 mm cannon, on the rear guard near the front, at unknown location in France, 1916 World War One)

(Credit: Reuters)

Genre

Search Help.

To find all currently available programmes, do a completely empty search.

To find something specific, add your search term and hit enter. Optionally, combine your query with a variety of filters to narrow your results. You can also search by using just the filters and an empty search box.

Using Search Filters.

Media Type filter:
Limit your search to either TV or radio using the radio buttons. Results will show both by default.
Genre Accessibility and Availability filters:
Add or exclude search terms using the add and exclude filter icons.

When you've chosen your filters, hit enter or use the 'Apply Filters' button.

Once a search is returned, add or exclude further terms from the results page and search again. Search results can be reordered by:

  • first or last brodcast dates,
  • availability ending soon,
  • relevance.

Find out more about BBC Programme Explorer