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Analysis

Why Do Men and Women Vote Differently?

BBC Radio 4
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28 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Alison Wolf examines gender gaps in the polling booth.

Alison Wolf examines gender gaps in the polling booth and asks why men and women vote differently.

The 2010 election campaign has started and politicians seem to be pitching harder than ever for the female vote. Party leaders are falling over each other to webchat with women on Mumsnet: David Cameron has already made three appearances and Gordon Brown recently went on, too. Brown's Mumsnet webchat resulted in headlines like: 'Biscuitgate: After 24 Hours of Dithering Gordon Brown finally confesses his favourite dunk'.

But does it really influence women's votes whether top politicians know about the most environmentally-friendly nappies or whether they can name their favourite biscuits? Women make up more than half of the electorate in the UK. But just like men, they're not a homogenous group. Women are just as affected by their class, locality, individual beliefs, age, ethnicity, jobs, social and marital status etc.. as men are when it comes to their voting behaviour.

Yet there is a difference in how women and men vote. This difference seems to be more pronounced in the US and other European countries like Sweden. But the UK is not immune to it, either. So there is a gender gap which manifests itself when women or men enter the polling booth.

Professor Alison Wolf, of King's College, London, explores the reasons for this gender gap. She asks whether there are particular women's issues that politicians need to hit in order to attract the female vote. Are women MPs more likely to attract women voters? And is true that women respond to the touchy-feely side of politicians more than men or is that just a cliche?

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Analysis

The Report

Islamic Extremism in British Universities

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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James Silver asks whether some UK campuses have become seedbeds for extremism.

James Silver asks whether some UK campuses have become seedbeds for extremism, following the attempt to blow up an airliner over Detroit on Christmas Day.

Talented student Umar Farouk Abdulmutalib was president of the Islamic Student Society at University College London.

His attempt to blow up an airliner over Detroit on Christmas Day has led to claims that more young Muslims are also being radicalised while studying at British universities.

James Silver investigates whether some university campuses are becoming seedbeds for extremism.

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The Report
BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Evan Davis and his guests discuss technical expertise and the art of the showroom.

Evan Davis is joined by a panel of business guests to discuss how much technical understanding they need of their products, and asks them to reveal the secrets of a good showroom.

Evan Davis is joined by a panel of top business guests to discuss how much technical understanding they need of their products, and he asks them to reveal the secrets of a good showroom.

Evan is joined by Lisa King, chief operating officer of Christie's, Dr Markus Miele, managing director of the appliance manufacturer Miele, and Frank Meehan, chief executive of handset manufacturer INQ Mobile.

Genre

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Astronomer Paul Murdin asks if Jupiter's moon, Europa, might sustain biological life.

Astronomer Paul Murdin explores if Jupiter's moon Europa might sustain biological life, an idea proposed by Arthur C Clarke in his novel 2010: A Second Space Odyssey.

Astronomer Paul Murdin explores the idea proposed by Arthur C Clarke in his novel 2010: A Second Space Odyssey that Jupiter's moon Europa might offer suitable conditions for living organisms. Four hundred years after Galileo first discovered Europa, scientists believe that data from the Galileo probe might just prove Clarke right.

Clarke's imaginings were recently backed up by pictures and data sent back by the Galileo probe which suggested that Europa was the only place in the solar system, apart from the Earth, that had deep, liquid water oceans, buried beneath an icy crust. Conditions in these oceans - dark and hot - could conceivably support biological life.

In the last year, NASA and the European Space Agency have announced their intention to launch a joint mission to Jupiter's moons in 2020. One of their key aims is to investigate Europa - and its potential for life - in greater detail.

Paul Murdin is a research astronomer at the University of Cambridge and Treasurer of the Royal Astronomical Society. In this programme he speaks to fellow astronomers, to astro-biologists and to scientists at NASA and the European Space Agency about the importance of Europa and the possibility of finding extra-terrestrial life there.

Readings by Joseph Cohen-Cole and David Seddon.

Last Word

05/02/2010

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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The lives of Sir Percy Cradock, Lucienne Day, Lt Col Lee Archer and Pernell Roberts.

John Wilson presents the obituary series. Marking the lives of Sir Percy Cradock, Lucienne Day, Lieutenant-Colonel Lee Archer and Pernell Roberts.

John Wilson presents the obituary series, analysing and celebrating the life stories of people who have recently died.

Marking the lives of Sir Percy Cradock, Lucienne Day, Lieutenant-Colonel Lee Archer and Pernell Roberts.

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Last Word
BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Morgan Freeman on playing Nelson Mandela in Clint Eastwood's Invictus.

Morgan Freeman reveals the secrets of playing Nelson Mandela in Clint Eastwood's new biopic, Invictus.

Morgan Freeman tells Francine Stock about the research he did to play Nelson Mandela in Clint Eastwood's drama, Invictus, about the Rugby World Cup in South Africa.

Director Cary Fukunaga reveals what happened when he rode the trains from South to North America with hundreds of illegal immigrants for his thriller Sin Nombre.

La Grande Vadrouille was the most succesful film in French cinemas until the release of Titanic, and is still phenomenally popular whenever it's shown on television. Ginette Vincendeau explains why this 1966 war comedy with Terry-Thomas is so well loved across the Channel.

Jane Graham reports on the state of film distribution in Britain and why the best-reviewed movies are often the most difficult to see.

Any Questions?

05/02/2010

BBC Radio 4
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50 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Jonathan Dimbleby chairs the topical debate from Edgware in Middlesex.

Jonathan Dimbleby chairs the topical debate from Edgware in Middlesex. The panellists are Benedict Brogan, Francis Crook, Esther Rantzen and Brian Paddick.

Jonathan Dimbleby chairs the topical debate from Edgware in Middlesex. The panellists are The Daily Telegraph's chief political commentator Benedict Brogan, Francis Crook, director of the Howard League for Penal Reform, broadcaster and parliamentary candidate Esther Rantzen, and Brian Paddick, former Metropolitan Police deputy assistant commissioner and former Liberal Democrat candidate for Mayor of London.

BBC Radio 4
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10 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Lisa Jardine on the need for climate scientists to take care when they inform and persuade

Lisa Jardine reflects on the need for climate scientists to take scrupulous care when they inform and persuade.

Genre

And the Academy Award Goes To...

Series 3 Episode 2: Gigi

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for years First broadcast:
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Paul Gambaccini discovers how Gallic charm won Gigi the Best Picture Oscar in 1959.

Paul Gambaccini discovers how Gigi, starring Leslie Caron, Maurice Chevalier and Louis Jourdan, won a record-breaking nine Oscars, including the Best Picture Award, in 1959.

In April 1959 the musical Gigi, starring Leslie Caron, Maurice Chevalier and Louis Jourdan, won nine Oscars including the Best Picture Award, breaking the previous record of eight awards which went to Gone With The Wind in 1940. Paul Gambaccini discovers how the combination of Gallic charm and memorable songs, including The Night They Invented Champagne, Gigi and I Remember It Well, sanitised Sidonie-Gabrielle Colette's risque novella for the big screen.

Considered to be the last of MGM's great musicals, Gigi tells the story of a young girl being groomed as a courtesan, and the movie's producers battled with the censors to get it made. Director Vincente Minnelli's lavish film, which was shot mostly in Paris, sugar-coated the subject matter, and Caron's gamine performance melted Hollywood cinemagoers.

The programme also explores how Gigi represented the passionate early days of the on-off American love affair with France - a relationship that has come under strain in recent years following the war in Iraq.

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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A look behind the scenes at Westminster with Ben Brogan.

A look behind the scenes at Westminster with Ben Brogan.

Gordon Brown's a bully, according to a new book by journalist Andrew Rawnsley. Downing Street has strongly denied the allegation. But it has dominated the political scene this week. The Prime Minister's long time supporter, Geoffrey Robinson, and a former Downing Street insider, reflect on the pressures of the top job.

The allegations are in part based on anonymous sources. The Guardian's Michael White and Newsweek's Stryker McGuire describe how journalists and figures from the political world work together.

What seems to have stopped the Tories' progress in the polls? Michael Heseltine and newly-selected Tory candidate, Nadhim Zahawi, wonder if the party is attacking Labour hard enough and if the message on the doorstep is clear.

This week's new guidelines on assisted suicide are not enough, according to campaigners who want to make it legal. But the opposition to any such move is fierce. Two peers, Margaret Jay and Ilora Finlay, take sides.

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Kate Adie introduces BBC foreign correspondents with the stories behind the headlines.

BBC foreign correspondents with the stories behind the world's headlines. Introduced by Kate Adie.

Genre

File on 4

Improvised Explosive Devices in Afghanistan

BBC Radio 4
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40 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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What is being done to tackle the threat of improvised explosive devices in Afghanistan.

Allan Urry investigates what is being done to combat the increasing threat to British and other coalition troops in Afghanistan of improvised explosive devices.

The government has pledged 150 million pounds to combat the threat of improvised explosive devices, which are now the biggest danger to British and other coalition troops in Afghanistan. But is the UK doing enough to tackle the increasing threat they pose? Allan Urry investigates.

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File on 4

In Touch

02/02/2010

BBC Radio 4
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20 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Peter talks to David Cowdrey from GDBA about their campaign to get all buses talking.

Peter White talks to David Cowdrey from the Guide Dogs for the Blind Association about the charity's campaign to get announcements on all our buses.

Peter White is joined by Mani Djazmi, who gives a round-up of the state of the national provision of bus companies who are able to provide announcements on buses. David Cowdrey from the Guide Dogs for the Blind Association talks about the organisation's campaign to support a Parliamentary Early Day Motion to bring about an amendment in the public transport regulations. They want it to be made statutory for bus companies to ensure buses are fitted with equimpent to provide destination announcements, a unified system and not the postcode lottery which exists at the moment. The organisation says that if all new buses had audio-visual systems, it would be a fraction of the cost comapred to retro-fitting. GDBA want next stop and final destination announcements. As trains are covered already, GDBA are seeking parity with these for safety reasons. As the regulations stand currently, if an emergency occurs there is no requirment for there to be audio-visual informatio provided to the passengers.

Lee Kumutat tries her hand at tennis and receives tution from coach Odette Battarel. Playing with a net 80cm from the ground and a spongy ball containing ball earings, players use a series of bounces - three for a blind person, two for a partially-sighted player and one for someone sighted. By calling 'play' to her opponent, Lee was able to hit the ball over the net successfully and enjoy a game of tennis for the first time. Lee also meets Alan Weatherley from British Blind Sport, whose aim is to get people involved in and enthused by sport.

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In Touch
BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Dr Mark Porter meets patients on the Active Back Programme in Stanmore, North London.

Dr Mark Porter meets patients on the Active Back Programme at the Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital who are learning to live with their condition and be physically active.

Dr Mark Porter meets patients on the Active Back Programme in Stanmore, North London.

For 15 years the Active Back Programme at the Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital has been helping people with long term back pain learn to live with their condition and be physically active.

Patients who attend the programme have had many medical interventions that have failed to make much of an impact on their back pain. The approach at RNOH is different - the programme doesn't aim to remove the pain, but it helps people get on with their lives and be able to do everyday activities such as shopping and exercise.

Physiotherapists, psychologists and occupational therapists give advice on how to make changes around the home so that people with back pain can do tasks in the kitchen and in the garden. Mark meets the patients on the programme who are playing table tennis for the first time, and who are discovering that rearranging pillows can help them get a good night's sleep.

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Case Notes

Jon Ronson On

Series 5 Episode 5: Ambition

BBC Radio 4
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28 minutes Available for years First broadcast:
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Jon interviews people at different points in their lives to assess how ambition shapes us.

Jon Ronson interviews people at different points in their lives to assess how driving ambition shapes us. From February 2010.

The writer Jon Ronson asks how our driving ambitions shape us. By interviewing several people at different points in their lives, he sees how ambition can make and break people.

He talks to an 11 year old boy who has plans to be a world class architect, a young woman who has set her sites on being Prime Minister and an ambitious stock broker whose success led him down a dangerous path towards a high security prison in the US.

Producer: Laura Parfitt

A Unique production for BBC Radio 4.

Midweek

03/02/2010

BBC Radio 4
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45 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Lively and diverse conversation with Francine Stock and guests including Bette Bourne.

This week Francine Stock is joined by Oran Canfield, Reg Green, Bette Bourne and Show of Hands.

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Midweek

Money Box Live

03/02/2010

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Vincent Duggleby and guests answer calls on investing in shares.

Vincent Duggleby and a panel of guests answer calls on financial issues.

Vincent Duggleby and guests answer calls on investing in shares.

Guests:

Morven Whyte, portfolio manager at Redmayne Bentley Stockbrokers

Gavin Oldham, chief executive officer, The Share Centre

Rob Burgeman, divisional director, Brewin Dolphin.

Genre

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Laurie Taylor explores national branding and the commodification of ethnic identity.

The way countries are seen worldwide has a huge effect on their power and prosperity. Laurie Taylor explores national branding and the commodification of ethnic identity.

How does a country's international reputation affect its economy and its political power? The diplomatic advisor Simon Anholt says it is extremely important, and takes great pains to measure national PR. Each year he publishes an index which ranks 50 countries in terms of their reputation. He tells Laurie Taylor who is at the top and who languishes at the bottom, and why.

Ethno-theme parks, Native American casinos and Kalahari bushmen attempting to reap profits from pharmaceutical companies using their traditional medicinal plants: all modern examples of how ethnic identity has become a commodity in today's global market place. John and Jean Comaroff explore how communities sell their traditional culture in their new book, Ethnicity Inc. They tell Laurie about the effect it has on indigenous cultures, and how selling your identity can be both empowering and impoverishing.

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Kate Adie presents stories from China, Kenya, Venezuela, Serbia and the United States.

Foreign correspondents with the stories behind the world's headlines. Introduced by Kate Adie.

Genre

Face the Facts

India's City of Tomorrow

BBC Radio 4
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27 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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John Waite reports from India on a controversial development involving Oxford University.

Outside Mumbai, a city destined to be the size of Paris and billed as free India's first hill station is taking shape. But at what price to locals who've lived there for centuries?

John reports from Lavasa, built across 12,500 acres in the Sahyadri Mountains outside Pune. One of the new residents will be a campus of the University of Oxford, and developers say the project creates jobs and much-needed housing. But what has been the effect on those who have seen their lands acquired and their livelihoods disappear, and what about wider concerns about the impact of these kinds lof luxury developments?

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