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Front Row

Dutch Artists in the Age of Vermeer, Vikram Seth, The Last Panthers

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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A look at Dutch Artists in the Age of Vermeer, at Buckingham Palace. Samira Ahmed presents

Arts news with Samira Ahmed, including Dutch Artists in the Age of Vermeer at Buckingham Palace, Vikram Seth on his Collected Poems and The Last Panthers reviewed.

Masters of the Everyday: Dutch Artists in the Age of Vermeer at The Queen's Gallery at Buckingham Palace is a new exhibition of masterpieces from the Royal Collection. Curator Desmond Shawe-Taylor explains the background to the show which includes works by Jan Steen and Pieter de Hooch, and which features Johannes Vermeer's A Lady at the Virginal with a Gentleman, The Music Lesson (above).

Vikram Seth, author of the international bestselling novel A Suitable Boy, discusses his substantial new publication, Collected Poems.

Samantha Morton and John Hurt star in the new TV drama series The Last Panthers, based on a real-life network of diamond thieves across Europe. Crime novelist Denise Mina reviews.

Austrian composer Georg Friedrich Haas - famous for his complex microtonal scores - discusses his bold new work Morgen und Abend for the Royal Opera House, featuring Out of Africa Austrian actor Klaus Maria Brandauer.

Presenter Samira Ahmed

Producer Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Presenter
Samira Ahmed
Interviewed Guest
Desmond Shawe-Taylor
Interviewed Guest
Vikram Seth
Interviewed Guest
Denise Mina
Interviewed Guest
Georg Haas
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

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Samuel Pepys, Jon Savage, Dana Fouras and Russell Maliphant

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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John Wilson presents a look at a new Samuel Pepys exhibition.

Arts news with John Wilson, including a look at the exhibition Samuel Pepys: Plague, Fire, Revolution, plus Jon Savage talks about his novel 1966: The Year the Decade Exploded.

Samuel Pepys: Plague, Fire, Revolution, is the largest ever exhibition about the famous 17th-century diarist which takes a look at the time in which Pepys lived, from the execution of Charles I through the rule of Cromwell to the reinstatement of the monarchy with Charles II, all happening alongside plague, the Great Fire and war. John Wilson talks to the two curators, Robert Blyth and Kristian Martin.

Music historian Jon Savage discusses his new novel 1966: The Year The Decade Exploded. In it he argues that the events of 1966 - including the developments in the civil and women rights movements, the escalation of the Vietnam War, and the availability of LSD - resulted in an explosion of creativity which can be traced through the music charts from The Stones' 19th Nervous Breakdown to The Four Tops' Reach Out and I'll be There.

Dancer Dana Fouras on her return to the stage after almost 15 years, as her husband, the choreographer Russell Maliphant celebrates the 20th anniversary of his close artistic collaboration with lighting designer Michael Hulls.

Presenter John Wilson

Producer Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Presenter
John Wilson
Interviewed Guest
Robert Blyth
Interviewed Guest
Kristian Martin
Interviewed Guest
Jon Savage
Interviewed Guest
Dana Fouras
Interviewed Guest
Russell Maliphant
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

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Front Row

Tom Rob Smith, Modern Scottish Women: Painters and Sculptors, Kevin Barry

BBC Radio 4
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Tom Rob Smith discusses his TV thriller London Spy. Kirsty Lang presents.

Arts news with Kirsty Lang, including Tom Rob Smith on his TV thriller London Spy and a look at the Modern Scottish Women: Painters and Sculptors exhibition.

Tom Rob Smith, the first crime writer to make it on to the Booker longlist with Child 44, discusses London Spy, his new TV thriller in which a young romantic, played by Ben Whishaw, is drawn through love into the dangerous world of espionage.

Irish writer Kevin Barry talks about his new novel Beatlebone, in which a crisis-ridden John Lennon tries to get to the island he owned in real life in Clew Bay, Co Mayo, in 1978.

Modern Scottish Women: Painters and Sculptors 1885-1965 is the first major exhibition of work by women artists to be mounted by the National Galleries of Scotland. Art critic Jan Patience reviews.

As part of the BBC On Stage season, Front Row goes backstage and eavesdrops on what's going on shortly before a show begins. Tonight Neve McIntosh, who plays Elizabeth Proctor in The Crucible at the Bristol Old Vic, shares the ritual of her preparation in the last half-hour before curtain-up.

Presenter Kirsty Lang

Producer Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Presenter
Kirsty Lang
Interviewed Guest
Tom Rob Smith
Interviewed Guest
Kevin Barry
Interviewed Guest
Jan Patience
Interviewed Guest
Neve McIntosh
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

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Front Row

Richard Eyre on Ibsen, Ancient Greek drama and PTSD, Vivien Duffield

BBC Radio 4
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Richard Eyre discusses his adaptation of Ibsen's play Little Eyolf. Kirsty Lang presents.

Arts news with Kirsty Lang, including Richard Eyre on Ibsen's Little Eyolf, and a look at how ancient Greek drama is being used to help modern war veterans coping with PTSD.

After two acclaimed Ibsen productions for the Almeida Theatre in London, Sir Richard Eyre discusses his new adaptation Ibsen's rarely-performed play, Little Eyolf, about a disintegrating marriage.

The Theatre of War is a project that is helping veterans of war in Iraq and Afghanistan suffering from PTSD. Creator Bryan Doerries and actor Jason Isaacs discuss how Ancient Greek drama - being performed by many Hollywood A-listers - is being used in the healing process.

In our series in which benefactors explain their reasons for funding the arts to the tune of many millions of pounds, Dame Vivien Duffield discusses her approach to donating substantial sums to a broad selection of cultural institutions.

Presenter Kirsty Lang

Producer Jerome Weatherald

(Main image: Richard Eyre in rehearsal for Little Eyolf. Credit: Hugo Glendinning).

Credits

Presenter
Kirsty Lang
Interviewed Guest
Richard Eyre
Interviewed Guest
Bryan Doerries
Interviewed Guest
Jason Isaacs
Interviewed Guest
Vivien Duffield
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

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Andrew Graham-Dixon on the Mona Lisa, David Bowie's Lazarus and Andrew Lloyd Webber's School of Rock open in New York

BBC Radio 4
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Andrew Graham-Dixon discusses his TV documentary on the Mona Lisa. Samira Ahmed presents.

Arts news with Samira Ahmed, including Andrew Graham-Dixon on his TV documentary on the Mona Lisa, and a look at David Bowie's Lazarus and Andrew Lloyd Webber's School of Rock.

Andrew Graham-Dixon discusses his TV documentary about the Mona Lisa, in which state-of-the-art technology has been used on the painting and reveals secrets which could significantly alter our view of Leonardo's masterpiece.

David Bowie's new stage show Lazarus - an adaptation of the novel The Man Who Fell to Earth - and Andrew Lloyd Webber and Julian Fellowes' School of Rock have just opened in New York. Theatre critic David Cote reviews both productions.

Sharon Bolton has set her latest thriller Little Black Lies in the Falkland Islands. She discusses the novel in which friendships are torn apart when one woman's sons are killed while in the care of her best friend, and the Islanders are having to deal with the reality that someone amongst them could be a killer.

Julia Eccleshare and Young Adult Fiction writer Sophia McDougall make their recommendations for Children's and Young Adult books for Christmas.

Presenter Samira Ahmed

Producer Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Presenter
Samira Ahmed
Interviewed Guest
David Cote
Interviewed Guest
Sharon Bolton
Interviewed Guest
Julia Eccleshare
Interviewed Guest
Sophia McDougall
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

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Harry Price: Ghost Hunter, Poets as novelists, Rosie Hood, The Haunting of Hill House

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Harry Price: Ghost Hunter, poets as novelists, Rosie Hood, The Haunting of Hill House.

Including a review of ITV's Harry Price: Ghost Hunter, a look at 20th-century novelists' poetry, singer Rosie Hood, and The Haunting of Hill House is adapted for stage.

Rafe Spall stars as a conman medium in the supernatural ITV drama Harry Price: Ghost Hunter. Viv Groskop reviews.

The poetry of Muriel Spark, George Orwell and Angela Carter - all important 20th century novelists - have recently been published. Front Row asks their editors what it reveals, and whether the poetry matches up to their prose.

Rosie Hood is a young folk singer who is just coming to the end of a year-long BBC Performing Arts Fellowship. She discusses the fellowship and how she has used it to research songs which were collected in her native Wiltshire a century ago.

Stephen King described Shirley Jackson's 1959 novel, The Haunting of Hill House, as one of the finest horror stories he'd ever come across. Jackson's tale of a troubled young woman's visit to an old and abandoned house has now been adapted for the stage at Liverpool Playhouse. Novelist MJ Hyland reviews.

Presenter Kirsty Lang

Producer Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Presenter
Kirsty Lang
Interviewed Guest
Viv Groskop
Interviewed Guest
Rosie Hood
Interviewed Guest
MJ Hyland
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

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Elvis Costello

BBC Radio 4
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Elvis Costello looks back over a musical career spanning almost four decades

At the piano with his guitar, Grammy Award-winning singer-songwriter Elvis Costello looks back over a musical career which spans almost four decades as he publishes his new memoir

Grammy Award-winning singer-songwriter Elvis Costello looks back over a musical career which spans almost four decades, as he publishes his new memoir Unfaithful Music & Disappearing Ink. Sitting at the Front Row piano with his guitar, the musician discusses his upbringing in London and Liverpool, the influence of his father - a successful radio dance-band vocalist - and the heady years of pop stardom with hits including Watching the Detectives, Pump It Up, Oliver's Army and (I Don't Want to Go to) Chelsea.

Presenter John Wilson

Producer Jerome Weatherald

Credits

Presenter
John Wilson
Interviewed Guest
Elvis Costello
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

Brand

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Front Row

David Bowie's Blackstar, Emma Rice, Don Paterson, Jericho

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Including a review of David Bowie's new jazz-influenced album Blackstar. With John Wilson.

Arts news with John Wilson, including David Bowie's new jazz-influenced album Blackstar and new artistic director of Shakespeare's Globe Emma Rice on her first season.

David Bowie's new jazz-influenced album Blackstar will be released on Friday to coincide with the singer's 69th birthday. Critic Kate Mossman gives her response to Bowie's 25th studio album, produced by long-term collaborator Tony Visconti, which has been described as 'the most extreme album of his career'.

Emma Rice, the incoming Artistic Director of Shakespeare's Globe in London, discusses plans for her 'wonder season' of plays the theatre will be staging from this summer.

Front Row's interviews with the winners of the Costa Book Awards continue with Don Paterson, whose collection, 40 Sonnets, has won the Poetry prize.

ITV's new historical drama Jericho, set in a Yorkshire mining town in the 1870s, is reviewed by critic Rachel Cooke.

Netflix's Making A Murderer is the latest true-crime documentary to hit the headlines. Seasoned documentary filmmaker Roger Graef considers the appeal of stories of possible miscarriages of justice.

Presenter John Wilson

Producer Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Presenter
John Wilson
Interviewed Guest
Kate Mossman
Interviewed Guest
Emma Rice
Interviewed Guest
Don Paterson
Interviewed Guest
Rachel Cooke
Interviewed Guest
Roger Graef
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

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David Bowie Remembered

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Colleagues and fellow artists reflect on the life of David Bowie.

The singer David Bowie is remembered by artists, musicians and colleagues as they consider the significance and legacy of the legendary star.

David Bowie - singer, songwriter, actor, artist, and cultural icon - is remembered by artists, musicians and colleagues as they consider the significance and legacy of the legendary star.

Presenter John Wilson

Producer Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Presenter
John Wilson
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

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Oscar Wilde's Dorian Gray, Utopias in fiction, Villagers

BBC Radio 4
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Oscar Wilde's grandson Merlin Holland on The Picture of Dorian Gray and utopias in fiction

Oscar Wilde's grandson Merlin Holland on The Picture of Dorian Gray, utopias in fiction, Conor O'Brien aka Villagers and the wild men of rock and ads.

Oscar Wilde's grandson Merlin Holland discusses his new adaptation of Wilde's novella The Picture of Dorian Gray for the West End stage.

As this year marks the 500th anniversary of the publication of Thomas More's Utopia, Jerry Brotton, Professor of Renaissance Studies, and Sarah Crossan, author of two YA dystopian novels (Breathe and Resist) discuss the impact of More's work on utopian and dystopian fiction.

Conor O'Brien, better known for Villagers - his Irish Indie folk band from Dublin - talks about performing old songs in a new way for their latest album Where Have You Been All My Life?

Shortly before his death last month, Motorhead's hard-living frontman Lemmy did an unlikely advert for milk. Ben Wardle considers the appeal for advertisers of the wild men of rock, from John Lydon to Alice Cooper.

Presenter John Wilson

Producer Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Presenter
John Wilson
Interviewed Guest
Merlin Holland
Interviewed Guest
Jerry Brotton
Interviewed Guest
Sarah Crossan
Interviewed Guest
Conor O'Brien
Interviewed Guest
Ben Wardle
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

Brand

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Front Row

John Dee, Marty Feldman show, Tibor Reich, Christopher Edge

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Including a review of a new John Dee exhibition. Presented by Samira Ahmed.

Arts news with Samira Ahmed, including a review of the exhibition Scholar, Courtier, Magician: the Lost Library of John Dee and a look at new Marty Feldman play Jeepers Creepers.

Scholar, Courtier, Magician: the Lost Library of John Dee (1527-1609) is a new exhibition which focuses on the work of the famous mathematician, astronomer, astrologer, imperialist, alchemist and spy who was a common presence in the court of Elizabeth I. Glyn Parry gives his response to the work on display.

Marty Feldman, the British comedy writer, comedian and actor, rose to fame writing shows like radio's Round the Horne and The Frost Report and starring in films including Young Frankenstein. A new play, Jeepers Creepers directed by Monty Python's Terry Jones, charts Feldman's move to Hollywood and his struggles with his new-found fame. Mic Wright reviews.

The Whitworth in Manchester is celebrating the centenary of pioneering designer Tibor Reich with a major retrospective. Reich, a Hungarian Jew forced to flee to Britain by the Nazis, is credited with modernising British textile design with projects such as Concorde, Coventry Cathedral, the Royal Yacht Britannia and Windsor Castle. Curator Frances Pritchard discusses the exhibition.

The Many Worlds of Albie Bright by Christopher Edge deals with matters of grief, quantum physics and parallel worlds. The author explains why he chose to tackle these subjects in a children's book.

Presenter Samira Ahmed

Producer Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Presenter
Samira Ahmed
Interviewed Guest
Glyn Parry
Interviewed Guest
Mic Wright
Interviewed Guest
Frances Pritchard
Interviewed Guest
Christopher Edge
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

Brand

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Front Row

Marc Chagall, Laura Marling, Frank Cottrell Boyce, Colm Tóibín

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Marc Chagall, Laura Marling, Frank Cottrell Boyce and Colm Tóibín's Cultural Exchange.

The art of Marc Chagall at Tate Liverpool, singer-songwriter Laura Marling, writer Frank Cottrell Boyce on his new show for Derry-Londonderry, and Colm Tóibín's Cultural Exchange.

With John Wilson.

Marc Chagall's paintings filled with colour, floating figures and Jewish motifs are among the most distinctive in art. A new exhibition at Tate Liverpool traces the creation of Chagall's style by following his early years as an artist in Paris and his native Russia. Jackie Wullschlager, author of the biography Chagall: Love and Exile, reviews.

St Colmcille, the patron saint of Derry/Londonderry, returns for a public pageant on a city-wide scale, starting this evening. Frank Cottrell Boyce, the writer behind the London 2012 Opening Ceremony, discusses how he created the story for this weekend's events in the UK's City of Culture. Many aspects of the city's history are celebrated, culminating in a showdown on the river front between St. Colmcille and his monstrous nemesis.

Singer-songwriter Laura Marling reflects on her new album Once I was an Eagle, and explains why she has chosen to base herself in Los Angeles. She also brings her guitar to the Front Row studio, to perform.

And the Irish writer Colm Tóibín makes his selection for the Cultural Exchange: Poem by Elizabeth Bishop, a reflection on a small painting of a scene in rural Nova Scotia, where the poet spent time as a child.

Producer Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Presenter
John Wilson
Interviewed Guest
Frank Cottrell-Boyce
Interviewed Guest
Laura Marling
Interviewed Guest
Colm Toibin
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

Brand

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Miranda Hart, Martin Amis, Kwame Kwei-Armah's Cultural Exchange

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Arts news, including Miranda Hart, Martin Amis and Kwame Kwei-Armah's Cultural Exchange.

Arts news with Mark Lawson. Miranda Hart on her career, Martin Amis on his novel Lionel Asbo: State of England, and Kwame Kwei-Armah selects a landmark play for Cultural Exchange.

With Mark Lawson.

Writer and comedy performer Miranda Hart reflects on her career so far, as her book Is It Just Me? appears in paperback.

Martin Amis discusses his 13th novel Lionel Asbo: State of England, a black comedy about a very violent and not very successful criminal and his nephew Desmond Pepperdine.

Playwright and actor Kwame Kwei-Armah, currently Artistic Director of Center Stage in Baltimore, Maryland, selects his Cultural Exchange: Joe Turner's Come and Gone by August Wilson

Producer Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Presenter
Mark Lawson
Interviewed Guest
Miranda Hart
Interviewed Guest
Martin Amis
Interviewed Guest
Kwame Kwei-Armah
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

Brand

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Lenny Henry, Joan Bakewell, Foghorn Requiem and the Kate Greenaway prize winner

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Lenny Henry returns to the stage, Joan Bakewell's Cultural Exchange and a Foghorn Requiem.

John Wilson talks to Lenny Henry as he returns to the stage in Fences. Joan Bakewell offers her choice for Cultural Exchange. Foghorns become musical instruments in a new requiem.

With John Wilson.

Lenny Henry returns to the stage after a succesful run playing Othello. He now stars in the Pulitzer prize-winning play Fences by American playwright August Wilson. Lenny Henry discusses the importance of the play and the challenge of memorising his lines in a role where he's rarely off the stage.

The winner of the CILIP Kate Greenaway Medal for children's book illustration is announced today. Previous winners include Raymond Briggs, Shirley Hughes, Lauren Child and Quentin Blake. John talks to this year's winner.

The foghorn is a disappearing sound from the British coastline - increasingly made redundant by the advances of GPS technology. Now an ambitious project is using GPS technology in the service of a Foghorn Requiem. Composed by Orlando Gough, the requiem features three brass bands, a flotilla of vessels positioned offshore, and the Souter Lighthouse Foghorn itself. Composer Orlando Gough and artist Lise Autogena discuss a one-off musical performance that aims to fuse the sounds from land and sea.

In tonight's Cultural Exchange, Joan Bakewell discusses her choice - Luchino Visconti's sumptuous 1963 film adaptation of di Lampedusa's novel The Leopard.

Credits

Presenter
John Wilson
Interviewed Guest
Lenny Henry
Interviewed Guest
Joan Bakewell
Producer
Jerome Weatherald
Editor
John Goudie

Brand

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Front Row

Giorgio Moroder, site-specific art, Tim Firth, Cultural Exchange

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Giorgio Moroder, site-specific art, Tim Firth and Francine Stock's Cultural Exchange.

Record producer Giorgio Moroder, artist Richard Wilson on site-specific art when it changes site, Calendar Girls writer Tim Firth, and Francine Stock's Cultural Exchange.

With John Wilson.

Disco legend, music producer and Oscar-winner Giorgio Moroder is the man behind hits from Donna Summer, The Three Degrees and Sparks. In a rare interview, Moroder reflects on his humble beginnings, his rise to fame and his recent comeback with Daft Punk.

As Roger Hiorns' blue crystal sculpture Seizure is moved from a derelict council flat in south London to the Yorkshire Sculpture Park, artist Richard Wilson and critic Rachel Campbell-Johnston consider the importance of site-specific art and what happens when an installation is transferred to an environment other than its original location.

Tim Firth, writer of the stage version of Calendar Girls - one of the most successful plays in recent British theatre - has turned his hand to a musical. The result is This Is My Family, which explores family life from the perspective of a 13 year old girl, and opens this week in Sheffield. Tim Firth and Daniel Evans, artistic director of Sheffield Theatres, discuss the project.

For Cultural Exchange, Francine Stock chooses The Apple, a film made by Iranian director Samira Makhmalbaf in 1998, when she was only 18 years old.

Producer Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Presenter
John Wilson
Interviewed Guest
Giorgio Moroder
Interviewed Guest
Richard Wilson
Interviewed Guest
Rachel Campbell-Johnston
Interviewed Guest
Tim Firth
Interviewed Guest
Daniel Evans
Interviewed Guest
Francine Stock
Producer
Jerome Weatherald
Editor
John Goudie

Brand

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Emma Watson in The Bling Ring, Anna Chancellor, Clarke Peters' Cultural Exchange

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Emma Watson in The Bling Ring, Anna Chancellor, and Clarke Peters' Cultural Exchange.

Review of Emma Watson in Sofia Coppola's film The Bling Ring, actress Anna Chancellor in Private Lives, actors playing themselves, and Clarke Peters selects his Cultural Exchange.

With John Wilson.

Emma Watson stars in The Bling Ring, Sofia Coppola's film about a teenage gang who raid the Hollywood homes of young celebrities. Jason Solomons reviews.

Actress Anna Chancellor discusses her role as Amanda in Noel Coward's Private Lives on stage. Anna won acclaim for roles on TV in Spooks and Pramface and was nominated for a BAFTA for BBC One's The Hour - and is still remembered as Hugh Grant's jilted fiancée Duckface in Four Weddings and a Funeral.

For Cultural Exchange, actor and musician Clarke Peters selects an anthropological book: They Came Before Columbus, by Dr Ivan Van Sertima. Dr Van Sertima argued that the Indians whom Columbus encountered had already met Africans, long before Columbus had got there. This would mean that Africans had first arrived in the Americas not as slaves, but far earlier - as explorers and traders.

A new apocalyptic comedy This is the End features James Franco, Seth Rogen and Emily Watson playing James Franco, Seth Rogen and Emily Watson. And this week Status Quo make their movie debut in action-comedy caper Bula Quo!, playing none other than Status Quo. Critic Adam Smith looks into this cinematic habit of actors playing alternative versions of themselves in films.

Producer Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Presenter
John Wilson
Interviewed Guest
Anna Chancellor
Interviewed Guest
Clarke Peters
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

Brand

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Front Row

Clive James on Dante, A Season in the Congo, Paula Milne's Cultural Exchange

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Mark Lawson reviews Joe Wright's new staging of A Season in the Congo by Aime Cesaire.

Arts news. Clive James discusses his translation of Dante's The Divine Comedy, a review of A Season in the Congo starring Chiwetel Ejiofor, and Paula Milne's Cultural Exchange.

With Mark Lawson.

Writer and poet Clive James discusses his ambitious version of Dante's 14th century epic poem The Divine Comedy. He reflects on the challenge and pleasure of translating the 14,233 lines which took him several years, while struggling with ill health which made him wonder whether he'd live to see it published.

Directed by Joe Wright and starring Chiwetel Ejiofor, the UK premiere of A Season in the Congo by Aimé Césaire opens on stage this week. Set in the Congo during the country's first year of independence, the play charts the life of Patrice Lumumba from his campaigning against Belgian rule, to becoming Prime Minster, to his assassination. Novelist Justin Cartwright gives his verdict.

Screenwriter Paula Milne offers her choice for Cultural Exchange - Five Easy Pieces, an influential 1970 film starring Jack Nicholson as a frustrated musician who drifts from job to job and embarks on a road trip to see his seriously ill father.

Producer Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Presenter
Mark Lawson
Interviewed Guest
Clive James
Interviewed Guest
Paula Milne
Producer
Jerome Weatherald
Editor
John Goudie

Brand

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Tony Grisoni, Richard Rogers, Imperial War Museum

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Architect Richard Rogers nominates a favourite public space for Cultural Exchange.

Southcliffe screenwriter Tony Grisoni, new galleries at the Imperial War Museum in London, and architect Richard Rogers nominates a favourite public space for Cultural Exchange.

With John Wilson.

Tony Grisoni, writer of Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas and the Red Riding TV series, discusses his latest project: Southcliffe is a new four-part drama for Channel 4, about a random killer on the loose in a small English rural town.

Architect Richard Rogers nominates a favourite public space for Cultural Exchange, in which leading creative minds share a cultural passion.

As the Imperial War Museum London partially re-opens its doors during its major redevelopment, John takes a look at the two new art exhibitions on display. Architecture of War examines the impact of conflict on the landscape and environment, and 5000 Feet is the Best - Omer Fast's multi-layered film about drone warfare - launches IWM Contemporary.

Artist and illustrator Ralph Steadman discusses his contribution to a festival about Surrealist artist Marcel Duchamp in Herne Bay, inspired by a trip Duchamp took to the Kentish coast in 1913. He wrote a postcard back to Paris declaring "I am not dead... I am in Herne Bay", and on his return started working on his famous ready-mades, fuelled by his experiences of the English seaside. Steadman reveals why he's donating his own urinal, which started life in the gentlemen's convenience of the Hackney Empire.

Producer Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Presenter
John Wilson
Interviewed Guest
Tony Grisoni
Interviewed Guest
Richard Rogers
Interviewed Guest
Ralph Steadman
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

Brand

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Conductor Marin Alsop, Philip French, Jean Seberg, returning TV series

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Mark Lawson interviews Marin Alsop, the first woman to conduct the Last Night of the Proms

Marin Alsop, the first woman to conduct the Last Night of the Proms, film critic Philip French on retiring after 50 years, the life of actress Jean Seberg, and returning TV series.

With Mark Lawson.

American conductor Marin Alsop discusses becoming the first woman to conduct the Last Night of the Proms. She also reflects on toying with the idea of conducting with one hand after injuring her wrist, and falling in love with Leonard Bernstein at the age of nine.

As Philip French puts away his pen after being The Observer's film critic for 50 years, coinciding with his 80th birthday today, he discusses the 2,500 films he has watched and the changes he has seen in cinema in that time.

As Bonjour Tristesse is re-released in cinemas, the tragic life of actress Jean Seberg is re-assessed by her biographer Garry McGee. The star of A Bout De Souffle and Saint Joan was a political activist and supporter of the Black Panther movement and became the subject of an investigation by the FBI. She committed suicide in 1979, after her film career had faded away amid bad press and conspiracy theories.

American drama series The Newsroom, created by Aaron Sorkin (The West Wing, The Social Network), returns to our TV screens this week for a second series, and Bad Education, a comedy written by and starring Jack Whitehall, also begins its second run. TV critic Chris Dunkley considers different ways to approach the potentially tricky second series.

Producer Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Presenter
Mark Lawson
Interviewed Guest
Marin Alsop
Interviewed Guest
Philip French
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

Brand

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Front Row

Lee Evans, White House Down, Man Booker shortlist

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

John Wilson with news of the shortlist for the Man Booker Prize for fiction.

Arts news with John Wilson, including comedian Lee Evans on his return to the theatre in Essex, new film White House Down, and the shortlist for the Man Booker Prize for fiction.

With John Wilson.

Comedian Lee Evans returns to stage in Barking in Essex, the last play written by screenwriter Clive Exton (Entertaining Mr Sloane, 10 Rillington Place, Jeeves and Wooster) before his death in 2007. The play centres on a dysfunctional criminal family from Essex and co-stars Sheila Hancock and Keeley Hawes. Lee Evans discusses swearing, Samuel Beckett, and the plumber providing inspiration for his forthcoming tour.

Roland Emmerich, director of disaster movies Independence Day and The Day After Tomorrow, is about to release his latest, White House Down, in which a heavily-armed group of paramilitary invaders target the President of the United States. Kate Muir reviews.

The shortlist for the Man Booker Prize for fiction was announced today. Contenders for the £50,000 prize are Jim Crace, Colm Toibin, Eleanor Catton, Jhumpa Lahiri, NoViolet Bulawayo and Ruth Ozeki. Chair of judges Robert Macfarlane and judge Natalie Haynes discuss their selection. The winner is announced on 15 October.

Producer Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Presenter
John Wilson
Interviewed Guest
Lee Evans
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

Brand

Front Row

Search Help.

To find all currently available programmes, do a completely empty search.

To find something specific, add your search term and hit enter. Optionally, combine your query with a variety of filters to narrow your results. You can also search by using just the filters and an empty search box.

Using Search Filters.

Media Type filter:
Limit your search to either TV or radio using the radio buttons. Results will show both by default.
Genre Accessibility and Availability filters:
Add or exclude search terms using the add and exclude filter icons.

When you've chosen your filters, hit enter or use the 'Apply Filters' button.

Once a search is returned, add or exclude further terms from the results page and search again. Search results can be reordered by:

  • first or last brodcast dates,
  • availability ending soon,
  • relevance.

Find out more about BBC Programme Explorer