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Westminster Abbey, The culture of the countryside, Gillian Allnutt

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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A visit to the Queen's Diamond Jubilee Galleries at Westminster Abbey.

Tom Dyckhoff assesses the £23m Weston Tower and the Queen's Diamond Jubilee Galleries at Westminster Abbey. Plus the appeal of the countryside to writers and poet Gillian Allnutt.

The £23m Weston Tower and the Queen's Diamond Jubilee Galleries at Westminster Abbey will be opening to the public next month. Architecture critic and historian Tom Dyckhoff gives his response to these two new additions to the abbey church, the site of all royal coronations since William the Conqueror in 1066.

Why are so many British writers setting their stories in the countryside at the moment? From the second series of the BBC comedy drama This Country, to plays including Barney Norris's Nightfall, Joe White's Mayfly and Simon Longman's Gundog, and novels such as Jon McGregor's Reservoir 13 and Ali Smith's Autumn, writers are turning to a new vision of 'the pastoral' for inspiration. Writer Barney Norris joins novelist Sarah Hall - who was born and raised in the Lake District - to consider whether writing about the countryside has become part of the zeitgeist again and why.

Gillian Allnutt's career as a poet stretches over four decades. In 2016 she was awarded the Queen's Gold Medal for Poetry. The poet discusses and reads from her new collection, Wake.

Presenter Samira Ahmed

Producer Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Presenter
Samira Ahmed
Interviewed Guest
Tom Dyckhoff
Interviewed Guest
Barney Norris
Interviewed Guest
Sarah Hall
Interviewed Guest
Gillian Allnutt
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

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Rupert Everett, Abir Mukherjee, Sex and the City 20 years on

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Rupert Everett on writing, directing and playing Oscar Wilde in The Happy Prince.

Rupert Everett disusses playing Oscar Wilde in The Happy Prince; novelist Abir Mukherjee on his latest, Smoke and Ashes; Sex and the City, 20 years on; and the late Mary Wilson.

Rupert Everett discusses his life-long passion for Oscar Wilde as he directs, writes and stars in his film The Happy Prince. Framed around Wilde's short story of the same name, the bio-pic focuses on Wilde at the end of his life, from his release from prison to his death in poverty in Paris three years later.

Abir Mukherjee's creation of detective Sam Wyndham, a British officer who finds himself in Calcutta in the 1920s, and his sidekick 'Surrender-Not' Bannerjee, won him a £10,000 publishing deal. He discusses the third book in the series, Smoke and Ashes, set against the backdrop of non-violent protest and increasing demands for Indian independence.

Twenty years ago this week Sex and the City launched in America on the HBO channel. To mark the anniversary, TV critic Emma Bullimore pours herself a Cosmopolitan and looks back at her favourite show...

Mary Wilson, who died yesterday at the age of 102, was in the public eye as the wife of the former Prime Minister Harold Wilson. She was lampooned in Mrs Wilson's Diary in Private Eye as a suburban down-to-earth middle class housewife. She was, though, something much rarer - a very popular poet. From the archive we hear her talking about her writing, the public response, and one of her poems.

Presenter Samira Ahmed

Producer Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Presenter
Samira Ahmed
Interviewed Guest
Rupert Everett
Interviewed Guest
Abir Mukherjee
Interviewed Guest
Emma Bullimore
Interviewed Guest
Mary Wilson
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

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Frida Kahlo, Fly by Night, Queer Eye, Cats in literature

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:

The new Frida Kahlo exhibition Making Her Self Up at the V&A and Queer Eye on TV.

Mexican artist Frida Kahlo in a major new exhibition. Plus the presence of cats in literature, from Keats to TS Eliot, 1500 pigeons create a work of art and Queer Eye on TV.

The V&A's latest exhibition includes 13 artworks by the Mexican painter Frida Kahlo, but far more of her colourful skirts, blouses and pieces of jewellery because Frida Kahlo: Making Her Self Up concentrates on Kahlo's greatest creation - the artist herself. Design critic Corinne Julius considers what it reveals about the famous modern Latin American artist and our attitude to her.

When we think of John Keats, we mostly think of Odes, Grecian Urns, Nightingales, and Autumn - we certainly don't think of cats. 200 years after Keats wrote his little-known comic gem To Mrs Reynolds's Cat, we consider the place of cats in literature - from Hemingway to Colette, and Stephen King to Tove Janssen. Cat-lover and writer Lynne Truss and literary historian John Bowen consider the relationship between writers and their feline 'mewses' and asks what makes a 'purr-fect' piece of cat prose?

1500 pigeons with small LED lights attached to their legs representing the messages they would once have carried over the battlefields of the First World War are the latest work by the American artist Duke Riley, who brings his performance piece Fly by Night to the UK for the first time. The work's co-ordinator Kitty Joe describes the event.

As the second series of Queer Eye launches on Netflix, writer Louis Wise assesses the show's popularity.

Presenter Stig Abell

Producer Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Presenter
Stig Abel
Interviewed Guest
Corinne Julius
Interviewed Guest
Lynne Truss
Interviewed Guest
John Bowen
Interviewed Guest
Kitty Joe
Interviewed Guest
Louis Wise
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

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Lee Miller and Surrealism in Britain, GLOW star Kate Nash, Pop-up arts

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Singer and GLOW star Kate Nash, and model-turned-photographer Lee Miller and Surrealism.

Lee Miller and Surrealism in Britain at the Hepworth Wakefield, English singer Kate Nash on her role in the wrestling TV drama GLOW, and pop-up arts in the UK.

The American photographer and former model Lee Miller had a leading role in championing Surrealism in Britain in the 1930s, which is the focus of a new exhibition at the Hepworth Wakefield. The show's curator Lauren Barnes, and Lee Miller's son Antony Penrose, consider her fascination for Surrealism and the artists involved, including Man Ray, Max Ernst and Salvador Dalí.

Singer Kate Nash discusses dealing with fame after the success of her debut album Made of Bricks and the mega hit single Foundations. She explains how learning to wrestle for her role in Netflix comedy GLOW rebuilt her confidence and how her new album, Yesterday Was Forever, was inspired by her teenage diary.

Pop-up restaurants, which appear in empty shops and car parks, have enlivened our food culture, and even had a rejuvenating impact on neighbourhoods. There are also pop-up galleries, music performance spaces and even, in York, a whole pop-up Shakespeare theatre and village. Cat Gardiner who has run pop-up galleries in Cardiff, the musician Sam Lee who is taking concerts out of buildings and putting them around campfires, and James Cundall, the man behind Shakespeare's Rose Theatre in York, discuss the impact of arts pop-ups.

Credits

Presenter
Stig Abell
Producer
Jerome Weatherald
Interviewed Guest
Kate Nash
Interviewed Guest
Cat Gardiner
Interviewed Guest
Sam Lee
Interviewed Guest
James Cundall
Interviewed Guest
Lauren Barnes
Interviewed Guest
Antony Penrose

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Bartlett Sher and The King and I, Olivia Laing, Museum of the Year report

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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The King and I director Bartlett Sher, and Olivia Laing on her debut novel Crudo.

Bartlett Sher on directing The King and I on stage, Olivia Laing on her debut novel Crudo, and an Art Fund Museum of the Year shortlistee The Postal Museum in London.

Bartlett Sher's adaption of The King and I won four Tony Awards during its run on Broadway and is transferring to London this month. The American director was highly praised for his updating of the Rodgers and Hammerstein musical, which is set in 19th century Siam but has been criticised for sexism and orientalism. Bartlett Sher discusses taking on this classic musical for a modern-day audience.

Writer and critic Olivia Laing, known for her non-fiction writing about art, sexuality and cities, discusses her debut novel. Crudo is a highly personal 'real time' account of the political and social upheavals taking place across the world during the summer of 2017, told from the dual perspectives of the writer herself and American experimental novelist Kathy Acker.

Ahead of the announcement next week of the winner of the £100,000 Art Fund Museum of the Year 2018, we'll be reporting from each of the five shortlisted museums, starting today with The Postal Museum in London, and its famous subterranean Mail Rail, which opened to the public last year.

Credits

Presenter
Samira Ahmed
Producer
Jerome Weatherald
Interviewed Guest
Bartlett Sher
Interviewed Guest
Olivia Laing

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Rob Brydon on Swimming With Men, Laura Wade, Ferens Art Gallery

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Rob Brydon on the set of film Swimming With Men, playwright Laura Wade, Claude Lanzmann.

On the set of Swimming With Men with Rob Brydon and Daniel Mays, Laura Wade, writer of Home, I'm Darling, final report on Art Fund Museum of the Year from Ferens Art Gallery, Hull.

Rob Brydon, Daniel Mays and Adeel Akhtar were among the actors spending long hours in swimming pools last summer rehearsing for, and shooting, the new British film Swimming With Men, based on a true story about a group of male synchronised swimmers competing in the world championships. Stig Abell reports from the set at Basildon swimming pool, which was masquerading as Milan, the venue for the finals.

Laura Wade, the playwright behind Posh and the stage adaption of Tipping the Velvet, discusses Home, I'm Darling, her new a play about a modern couple trying emulate the happy domesticity of the 1950s.

With the announcement of the winner of the £100,000 Art Fund Museum of the Year 2018 later this evening, we have our final report from the five finalists. So far we've heard from Brooklands Museum in Weybridge, Glasgow Women's Library, The Postal Museum in London, and Tate St Ives. Tonight we visit Ferens Art Gallery in Hull, which was at the heart of Hull UK City of Culture last year.

Filmmaker and writer Claude Lanzmann, famous for Shoah - his 1985 epic exploration of the Holocaust, has died. He's remembered by the writer and cultural critic Agnes Poirier.

Presenter Stig Abell

Producer Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Presenter
Stig Abell
Interviewed Guest
Rob Brydon
Interviewed Guest
Daniel Mays
Interviewed Guest
Adeel Akhtar
Interviewed Guest
Laura Wade
Interviewed Guest
Agnes Poirier
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

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Shappi Khorsandi and Gillian Clarke on stage in the BBC's Big Blue Tent at the Edinburgh Festival

BBC Radio 4
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Shappi Khorsandi and Nassim Soleimanpour in front of a live audience in Edinburgh.

Shappi Khorsandi and Nassim Soleimanpour are joined by fellow guests Gillian Clarke, Fergus Linehan and Dr Pamela Epps in front of a live audience at the Edinburgh Festival.

Shappi Khorsandi is the first guest in a week of programmes from the Edinburgh Festival. On stage in front of a live audience in the BBC's Big Blue Tent, she discusses her new show Mistress and Misfit, about Admiral Lord Horatio Nelson's mistress, Lady Emma Hamilton.

In Nassim, Iranian playwright Nassim Soleimanpour sets out to teach the audience his native language Farsi in a show which features a different performer from the Festival each day. So how does he prepare when the deal is that performers have not even seen the script before stepping out in front of an audience?

The former National Poet of Wales, Gillian Clarke, discusses her new poetry collection Zoology.

As the Edinburgh International Festival and Fringe celebrate their 70th birthday this year, the International Festival's director Fergus Lenehan is joined by 90-year-old Dr Pamela Epps, who has attended every festival in the city since 1947.

Presenter John Wilson

Producer Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Performer
Shappi Khorsandi
Performer
Nassim Soleimanpour
Interviewed Guest
Gillian Clarke
Interviewed Guest
Fergus Lenehan
Interviewed Guest
Pamela Epps
Presenter
John Wilson
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

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Joanne Froggatt, Darren Aronofsky, 25 years of Classic FM

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:

Downton Abbey's Joanne Froggatt, and Black Swan director Darren Aronofsky.

Joanne Frogatt discusses her latest role in ITV drama Liar; Black Swan film director Darren Aronofsky on the mixed reactions to his new film Mother!; 25 years of Classic FM.

Joanne Froggatt was taken to the nation's hearts when she played Anna Bates, the lady's maid in Downton Abbey. One of the storylines which had a huge impact, and won her a Golden Globe, showed the aftermath of her being raped. Now she takes on similar territory but a very different character in Liar, a new ITV thriller in which she plays Laura, a woman who says she's been raped. She talks to Samira about her choice of roles and not shying away from difficult subjects.

Black Swan and The Wrestler director Darren Aronofsky discusses his controversial new film Mother! The film, which stars Jennifer Lawrence and Javier Bardem, was booed, and cheered, when it premiered at Venice Film Festival this week, and the reviews have been similarly divisive with some hailing it as a masterpiece and others a hyperbolic mess.

As Classic FM celebrates its 25th anniversary, Quentin Letts of the Daily Mail and The Spectator's Kate Chisholm consider what influence it has had on the coverage of classical music on the radio, and the impact its arrival had on BBC Radio 3.

Presenter: Samira Ahmed

Producer: Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Interviewed Guest
Joanne Froggatt
Interviewed Guest
Darren Aronofsky
Interviewed Guest
Quentin Letts
Interviewed Guest
Kate Chisholm
Presenter
Samira Ahmed
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

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Ute Lemper, Steelworks play We're Still Here, Vasily Petrenko

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Singer Ute Lemper, Welsh play We're Still Here, Russian conductor Vasily Petrenko.

Singer Ute Lemper performs live; a report on the National Theatre of Wales's play We're Still Here; Vasily Petrenko offers his top tips for conducting.

The German cabaret singer Ute Lemper joins Kirsty in the studio to perform from her Last Tango in Berlin series of songs, which features the music of Brecht, Weill, Piaf and Marlene Dietrich.

Kirsty visits Port Talbot where the National Theatre of Wales is staging a new play, We're Still Here, inspired by the threatened closure of the town's steelworks in 2015 and the hundreds of people who lost their jobs. Kirsty talks to the creators Rhiannon White and Evie Manning, and Sam Coombes, the steelworker who has taken a sabbatical to star in the production.

If you've ever wondered what it take to be a great conductor, Vasily Petrenko, winner of the Gramophone Artist of the Year 2017, gives his top tips of dos and don'ts.

Presenter Kirsty Lang

Producer Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Interviewed Guest
Ute Lemper
Interviewed Guest
Rhiannon White
Interviewed Guest
Evie Manning
Interviewed Guest
Sam Coombes
Interviewed Guest
Vasily Petrenko
Presenter
Kirsty Lang
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

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Nancy Meyers, Jenny Erpenbeck, Literary modern classics, Turner Prize show

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Romcom director and writer Nancy Meyers, and what makes a literary modern classic.

Romcom director and writer Nancy Meyers; Jenny Erpenbeck on her new novel Go, Went, Gone; what makes a literary modern classic; the 2017 Turner Prize exhibition in Hull.

Nancy Meyers has made her career making hugely popular romantic comedies such as The Holiday, It's Complicated and What Women Want. As her latest venture, Home Again, comes to cinemas we speak to Nancy Meyers about the rom-com and her career in Hollywood.

Last week, UK book publishers Bloomsbury launched their first 'Modern Classics' series, joining the likes of Picador, Faber & Faber and of course Penguin, who established their iconic series way back in 1961. But why are certain books deemed worthy of the label? And what exactly does the term mean in the first place? The curator of Bloomsbury's new series, Alison Hennessey, and literary critic Suzi Feay discuss what makes a modern classic.

The migration crisis was seen as a key factor in Germany's election results this weekend with the nationalist AfD party winning enough parliamentary seats to become the third-largest party in the Bundestag. Award-winning novelist Jenny Erpenbeck was born in East Germany and she discusses her latest novel - Go, Went, Gone - which explores the crisis from the perspective of a recently-retired German professor based in East Berlin, who discovers that the transitions in his own life connect him in ways he had never imagined to the thousands seeking new lives in Germany.

With the Turner Prize scrapping its eligibility age limit of 50, the work of the four artists who've made the shortlist - two of whom are over 50 - goes on display this week. Critic Jonathan Jones casts an eye over the Turner Prize exhibition which this year takes place at the Ferens Art Gallery in Hull for the first time.

Presenter Kirsty Lang

Producer Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Interviewed Guest
Nancy Meyers
Interviewed Guest
Alison Hennessey
Interviewed Guest
Suzi Feay
Interviewed Guest
Jenny Erpenbeck
Interviewed Guest
Jonathan Jones
Presenter
Kirsty Lang
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

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Director Sally Potter, Composer Jimmy Webb, Anorexia on screen

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Sally Potter on her film The Party, and the composer of Wichita Lineman, Jimmy Webb.

Arts news, interviews and reviews. Sally Potter discusses her new film the Party; songwriter Jimmy Webb on his many hits including Wichita Lineman and Galveston; anorexia on film.

In Sally Potter's latest film, The Party, a group of friends meet to celebrate a promotion but their lives begin to unravel as shocking secrets are exposed. The writer-director speaks to John about the film which stars Kristin Scott Thomas, Timothy Spall and Emily Mortimer.

Writer and critic Hadley Freeman and the playwright and TV writer and actor Eva O'Connor discuss the challenges of depicting anorexia on screen. Eva's drama Overshadowed on BBC 3 has been widely praised for its portrayal of the illness, but why is it that programme makers so often get it wrong?

Jimmy Webb, the songwriter, composer and arranger, has written for some of the biggest names in the business, and wrote over 100 songs for Glen Campbell. The multi-Grammy-award-winning writer looks back over his own life and work - including his hit songs Galveston and Wichita Lineman - which feature in his new memoir The Cake and The Rain.

Presenter John Wilson

Producer Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Presenter
John Wilson
Producer
Jerome Weatherald
Interviewed Guest
Sally Potter
Interviewed Guest
Hadley Freeman
Interviewed Guest
Eva O'Connor
Interviewed Guest
Jimmy Webb

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St Vincent, Andrew Michael Hurley, The Tin Drum, Daljit Nagra

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

St Vincent on her new album Masseduction, and novelist Andrew Michael Hurley.

St Vincent discusses her new album Masseduction; poet Daljit Nagra on poetry in TV and radio adverts; novelist Andrew Michael Hurley; and Gunter Grass's The Tin Drum on stage.

The American singer St. Vincent, aka Annie Clark, discusses her new album Masseduction.

Andrew Michael Hurley's debut novel The Loney was a runaway success, winning the 2015 Costa Book Award in the First Novel category. The author discusses his follow-up, Devil's Day, which like The Loney is a gothic horror story set in Lancashire.

The Tin Drum by Nobel Laureate Günter Grass centres on Oskar, who refuses to grow from the age of 3 and has a voice that can shatter glass. The Cornwall-based theatre company Kneehigh have adapted the story for the stage and is currently touring the UK. Writer and broadcaster Paul Allen reviews.

Poet Daljit Nagra considers the current fashion for TV and radio adverts to feature poetry.

Presenter Stig Abell

Producer Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Presenter
Stig Abell
Interviewed Guest
undefined St Vincent
Interviewed Guest
Andrew Hurley
Interviewed Guest
Paul Allen
Interviewed Guest
Daljit Nagra
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

Brand

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Stranger Things 2, Richard Bean on Young Marx, The Essay

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Richard Bean on his new play Young Marx, and Stranger Things 2 reviewed.

Richard Bean discusses his new play Young Marx; a discussion on the revival of the essay; a review of Netflix series Stranger Things 2; and underwater concert AquaSonic.

Nicholas Hytner, who used to run the National Theatre, has a new project - The Bridge Theatre. Richard Bean (who wrote One Man Two Guvnors) and Clive Coleman discuss their play Young Marx, the theatre's opening production, which reveals how the man who brilliantly analysed the workings of the capitalist economy was hopeless with money.

Stranger Things, the retro Netflix teen sci-fi series, was a surprise breakout TV hit last year. Can its sequel, Stranger Things 2, live up to the expectation? Boyd Hilton gives his verdict.

Rosalind Porter, Deputy Editor of Granta, and essayist Francis Spufford discuss the revival of the essay - a literary form which last enjoyed a golden age in the 18th century and is finding new fans in the 21st century.

And music from the Danish group Between Music, who perform their new concert AquaSonic underwater.

Presenter Samira Ahmed

Producer Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Presenter
Samira Ahmed
Interviewed Guest
Richard Bean
Interviewed Guest
Clive Coleman
Interviewed Guest
Boyd Hilton
Interviewed Guest
Rosalind Porter
Interviewed Guest
Francis Spufford
Performer
undefined Between Music
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

Brand

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Lisette Oropesa, Richard Flanagan, Kate MccGwire

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Opera singer Lisette Oropesa, novelist Richard Flanagan, artist Kate MccGwire.

Man Booker Prize-winning novelist Richard Flanagan, opera singer Lisette Oropesa and feathers sculpture artist Kate MccGwire.

As she makes her debut at the Royal Opera House in Lucia di Lammermoor, Lisette Oropesa talks about combining a career as one of the world's top sopranos with a passion for running marathons.

Richard Flanagan won the 2014 Man Booker Prize for The Narrow Road to the Deep North. He talks to Shahidha Bari about his follow-up novel, First Person, based on his own experience of ghost-writing a notorious criminal's memoir when he was a penniless and unknown author.

Kate MccGwire makes elaborate sculptures from the feathers of crows and doves to jays and magpies. Shahidha visits the artist in her studio - a Dutch barge - where she creates her works surrounded by Thames wildlife.

Presenter Shahidha Bari

Producer Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Presenter
Shahidha Bari
Interviewed Guest
Lisette Oropesa
Interviewed Guest
Richard Flanagan
Interviewed Guest
Kate MccGwire
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

Brand

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Annette Bening, Music managers, Drama podcast review

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Annette Bening discusses Film Stars Don't Die in Liverpool, co-starring Jamie Bell.

Annette Bening on Film Stars Don't Die in Liverpool; the changing role of the music manager; and John Naughton with his pick of the best drama and readings podcasts.

Annette Bening discusses her role as Oscar-winning actress Gloria Grahame in Film Stars Don't Die in Liverpool, the story of the real-life romance between Grahame and a struggling young actor from Liverpool.

As the Music Managers Forum celebrates 25 years with its annual Artist and Manager Awards tomorrow, John looks at what makes a good music manager and how the role has changed since the '60s - with Ed Sheeran's manager Stuart Camp, Regine Moylett and Niamh Byrne who look after Gorillaz and Blur, and Wham!'s manager Simon Napier-Bell. We also hear from musicians Emeli Sandé and Sir Paul McCartney.

Tracks is an award-winning podcast from Radio 4 drama. Pete Naughton reviews the second series of the conspiracy thriller and considers the wider landscape of drama and readings podcasts.

Presenter John Wilson

Producer Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Presenter
John Wilson
Interviewed Guest
Annette Bening
Interviewed Guest
Stuart Camp
Interviewed Guest
Regine Moylett
Interviewed Guest
Niamh Byrne
Interviewed Guest
Simon Napier-Bell
Interviewed Guest
Emeli Sande
Interviewed Guest
Paul McCartney
Interviewed Guest
Pete Naughton
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

Brand

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Modigliani, Costa Book Awards shortlists, John Lithgow

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

The announcement of the Costa Book Awards shortlists and Modigliani reviewed.

The announcement of the Costa Book Awards shortlists, actor John Lithgow who stars in Daddy's Home 2, and a review of the new exhibition by Amedeo Modigliani at Tate Modern.

A new Modigliani exhibition at Tate Modern shows the most extensive display of the Italian Jewish painter and sculptor's work yet seen in the UK, including 12 of his famous nudes. Sarah Crompton reviews.

Front Row reveals this year's Costa Book Awards shortlists. Critics Alex Clark and Toby Lichtig comment on the writers chosen in the five categories: novel, first novel, poetry, biography and children's fiction. The overall prize-winner will be announced on Front Row on 30 January 2018.

Actor John Lithgow discusses his latest film Daddy's Home 2, and talks more broadly about his wide-ranging career and why he's as happy playing an alien as he is a serial killer or Winston Churchill.

Presenter Samira Ahmed

Producer Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Presenter
Samira Ahmed
Interviewed Guest
Sarah Crompton
Interviewed Guest
Alex Clark
Interviewed Guest
Toby Lichtig
Interviewed Guest
John Lithgow
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

Brand

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Vanessa Redgrave, Imperium, French African artefacts, Sally Rooney

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Vanessa Redgrave looks back over her long and varied career, and Imperium at the RSC.

Vanessa Redgrave on receiving the Richard Harris Award; Robert Harris's Cicero trilogy brought to the stage; the repatriation of French African artefacts; Sally Rooney.

Vanessa Redgrave has just been awarded the Richard Harris Award which is given to an actor for their outstanding contribution to British film. She talks to Stig about her long career in cinema and theatre.

Imperium is the Royal Shakespeare Company's new six-hour production which looks at power politics in ancient Rome, which is based on Robert Harris's bestselling Cicero trilogy. The writer and classical historian Natalie Haynes has seen the production and gives her verdict.

French president Emmanuel Macron has called for African artefacts currently held in French museums to be returned to their countries of origin. Cultural historian Andrew Hussey discusses the reaction in France, the practicalities of such a pledge, and what pressure it might put on museums in Britain.

The Irish writer Sally Rooney has just been awarded The 2017 Sunday Times/Peters Fraser + Dunlop Young Writer of the Year Award for Conversations With Friends. The 26-year-old's debut novel has become a critical and word-of-mouth hit this year, acclaimed as fresh and clever. She talks to Stig about the book and what the win means to her.

Presenter Stig Abell

Producer Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Interviewed Guest
Vanessa Redgrave
Interviewed Guest
Natalie Haynes
Interviewed Guest
Andrew Hussey
Interviewed Guest
Sally Rooney
Presenter
Stig Abell
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

Brand

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Emma Rice, John Boyega, Laura Ingalls Wilder

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Theatre director Emma Rice discusses her final production at Shakespeare's Globe.

Theatre director Emma Rice discusses her final production at Shakespeare's Globe and why she left after only two years. Plus actor John Boyega on Star Wars: The Last Jedi.

Theatre director Emma Rice talks about her final production as Artistic Director of Shakespeare's Globe, The Little Matchgirl and Other Happier Tales. She discusses the inspiration for the show as well as her reasons for leaving her post after only two seasons in the job.

Children's writer Laura Ingalls Wilder's Little House on the Prairie novels have been much loved since they were first published in America during the Great Depression. Caroline Fraser, the author of a new biography Prairie Fires, and Eddie Higgins, a British member of the Laura Ingalls Wilder Legacy and Research Association, examine Wilder's life and popularity, 150 years since her birth.

South London-born actor John Boyega discusses improvising on the set of his latest film, the sci-fi behemoth Star Wars: The Last Jedi and why he likes to mix Hollywood blockbusters with theatre.

Presenter: Samira Ahmed

Producer: Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Presenter
Samira Ahmed
Interviewed Guest
Emma Rice
Interviewed Guest
Caroline Fraser
Interviewed Guest
Eddie Higgins
Interviewed Guest
John Boyega
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

Brand

Front Row

Front Row

Emily Watson, Older women on screen, Christmas songs

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Emily Watson on the new TV adaptation of Little Women, and older women on screen.

Emily Watson on the TV adaptation of Little Women, Tracy-Ann Oberman and MaryAnn Johanson discuss the portrayal of older women on screen, Dr Who's regeneration and Christmas songs.

Emily Watson discusses her role as Marmee March, the mother of four daughters, in the new BBC TV adaptation of Louisa May Alcott's novel Little Women, set in 1860s Massachusetts against the background of the American Civil War.

As the landmark film The Graduate turns 50 today, actress Tracy Ann Oberman and film critic MaryAnn Johanson discuss how the character of the seductress Mrs Robinson shaped the role of the older woman on screen.

Ahead of this year's Doctor Who Christmas Special which features the regeneration of the 12th Doctor, Peter Capaldi, we ask Doctor Who: The Fan Show's Christel Dee exactly what regeneration is, how it works, and what we can expect from the Christmas Special.

With only a couple of days left before Christmas, music writer Ben Wardle breathes a sigh of relief that he won't be bombarded for much longer by those perennial Christmas songs, from Wham to Wizzard. He discusses what makes an enduring Christmas pop tune and how having one in your back catalogue can be a nice little earner.

Presenter John Wilson

Producer Jerome Weatherald

Image: Marmee March (EMILY WATSON), Meg March (WILLA FITZGERALD)

Credit: BBC/Playground/Patrick Redmond.

Credits

Presenter
John Wilson
Interviewed Guest
Emily Watson
Interviewed Guest
Tracy-Ann Oberman
Interviewed Guest
MaryAnn Johanson
Interviewed Guest
Christel Dee
Interviewed Guest
Ben Wardle
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

Brand

Front Row

Front Row

Michelle Terry, Jez Butterworth, Rebecca Stott, Hostiles

BBC Radio 4
BBC Radio 4 logo
30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Shakespeare's Globe's new artistic director Michelle Terry, and the Costa biography winner

Michelle Terry on taking the helm at Shakespeare's Globe; Rebecca Stott discusses her Costa-winning memoir; Jez Butterworth on his TV drama Britannia; Hostiles reviewed.

Michelle Terry takes over as Artistic Director at Shakespeare's Globe in London in April, and today she announced details of her first season. She discusses her plans, as well as the drama off-stage that led to her predecessor Emma Rice's controversial early departure.

Rebecca Stott, winner of the Biography category in this year's Costa Book Awards announced on Front Row this week, discusses In the Days of Rain, her part-memoir, part-biography, about her family's historical involvement with - and escape from - the fundamentalist Christian sect, the Exclusive Brethren.

Christian Bale, Rosamund Pike and Wes Studi star in the new big-screen western, Hostiles. Tim Robey reviews the film and considers the portrayal of the Native American characters, so often side-lined in this genre.

Jez Butterworth, who wrote the West End hits Mojo, Jerusalem and The Ferryman, discusses his latest project, the Sky TV drama Britannia. The Celts try to resist the Roman invasion amidst myth and mystery, but it's not Game of Thrones, the writer insists.

Presenter Samira Ahmed

Producer Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Interviewed Guest
Michelle Terry
Interviewed Guest
Rebecca Stott
Interviewed Guest
Tim Robey
Interviewed Guest
Jez Butterworth
Presenter
Samira Ahmed
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

Brand

Front Row

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