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The Making of Modern Medicine

Episode 8: Learning from the illiterate

BBC Radio 4
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15 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:

Smallpox was taking between 10-15 per cent of all lives in Europe.

By the early 18th Century, smallpox was taking between 10-15 per cent of all lives in Europe and physicians were constantly arguing about how best to cure it.

A major new narrative history series exploring over 2,000 years of western medicine, written and presented by medical historian Andrew Cunningham.

8/30. Learning from the illiterate

By the early 18th Century, smallpox was taking between 10-15% of all lives in Europe and physicians were constantly arguing about how best to cure it. But a new method of treatment was gradually coming to attention – something which peasants and slaves had known for centuries.

This episode explores the work of the inoculators which would force medics to contradict all that they had learned. But would their work guarantee safe long-term protection from smallpox infection?

The readers are Tamsin Greig, Annette Badland, David Rintoul, Scott Handy and Jason Watkins.

Thinking Allowed

Alistair Cooke and Bio-Piracy - Wedding Presents

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:

Laurie Taylor examines the phenomenon of bio-piracy and wedding present etiquette.

Laurie Taylor explores the international clandestine trade of human tissue trafficking and bio-piracy with Professor Nancy Scheper-Hughes.

ALISTAIR COOKE and BIO-PIRACY

In 2004 Alistair Cooke, former Radio 4 presenter, died at the age of 95. He had requested for his remains to be cremated but instead his legs, arms and pelvis were removed as part of a criminal body trafficking conspiracy. Subsequently, his trafficked tissue and bone sold for more than $7000 despite his advanced age and the fact that he had cancer. It is now thought that the body parts were used in medical procedures in the UK and were part of a huge international clandestine trade. Laurie Taylor examines the growing phenomenon of bio-piracy and talks to Professor Nancy Scheper-Hughes, Advisor to the World Health Organisation who will be unveiling her new research in to this massive and largely unregulated industry.

WEDDING PRESENTS

Louise Purbrick, Senior lecturer at University of Brighton and author of The Wedding Present; Domestic Life Beyond Consumption and Dr Rachel Hurdley, Research Associate at Cardiff University discuss the social history of the wedding present. What happens to unwanted presents? Has the ‘wedding list’ killed off the original meaning of the gift? And when it is chosen by the receiver and often never seen by the giver why do we continue to give presents at weddings?

Click On

Series 1 Episode 3

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:

Rajesh Mirchandani takes a look at the social side of digital technology.

It's the time of year when people are thinking about relationships, so Rajesh Mirchandani takes a look at the social side of digital technology.

The Making of Modern Medicine

Episode 9: The Coming of the GP

BBC Radio 4
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15 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:

The clash between old guard physicians and a new breed of general practitioners.

A dramatic siege took place in 1767 outside the Royal College of Physicians in London between old guard physicians and a new breed of general practitioners from Scotland.

A major new narrative history series exploring over 2,000 years of western medicine, written and presented by medical historian Andrew Cunningham.

9/30. The Coming of the GP

Samuel Foote's riotous hit comedy The Devil Upon Two Sticks offers intriguing insight into a dramatic siege that took place in 1767 outside the Royal College of Physicians in London between old guard physicians and a new breed of general practitioners from Scotland.

The individual practices of physicians, surgeons and apothecaries were now under threat. It was to mark a major change in the skills and qualifications of medical men with the coming of the general practitioner, and as we discover, a violent outbreak of class war within medicine.

The readers are David Rintoul, Peter Capaldi, Jason Watkins and Scott Handy.

Material World

Acoustic Mapping - The Earth’s Big Dynamo

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:

Quentin Cooper finds out computers can simulate the acoustics of any building.

Quentin Cooper talks to Damian Murphy from York University who is using the latest acoustic mapping techniques to re-create the exact sound of ancient and new buildings.

Acoustic Mapping

Scientists have been recreating the exact sounds of a building without having to actually be there.

Sue Nelson talks to Damian Murphy from York University who is using the latest acoustic mapping techniques to recreate the exact sound of ancient and new buildings.

He does this by capturing a series of room impulse response profiles - the acoustic fingerprint of a particular environment for a sound source and listener located at a specific position within it.

He can even recreate the acoustics of buildings that no longer exist, such as the old cathedral in Coventry.

Sue also talks to psychoacoustics expert Dr. Peter Rutherford from the School of the Built Environment at the University of Nottingham about how we hear and the interplay between music and the environment.

He explains how the physical acoustic properties of a building can change depending on how your brain listens to it and why the designers of concert halls are increasingly turning to scientific techniques to create exactly the right kind of sound.

The Earth’s big dynamo

The problem of how the Earth generates and maintains its magnetic field was described by Einstein as one of the top five problems facing physics.

Theory has been about 30 years ahead of experiment in the realm of “Magnetohydrodynamics” – the area of physics that deals with how a massive ball of liquid metal can generate, and sustain, a magnetic field in the way the Earth’s core seems to.

Recently a team of scientists in France have taken the lead in the race to build a model Earth by stirring a tank of liquid sodium using a pair of propellers spinning in opposite directions.

Joining Sue to discuss how such a simple apparatus has potentially opened up a whole new corner of experimental physics is Professor Keith Moffatt of Trinity College, Cambridge and Dr Jean-François Pinton of the Ecole Normale Supérieure in Lyon.

In Business

Private Grief

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

The influence of private equity firms' is increasing, causing growing concerns.

The influence of private equity firms' is increasing. But with their growing power comes increasing concerns. Do private equity firms really create value for the British economy?

Genre

Brand

In Business
BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:

Former government chief scientist, Lord May, looks at the role of politics in science.

Former government chief scientist and president of the Royal Society, Lord May, examines the crucial but uneasy relationship between politics and science.

Climate change, medicine, the food we eat, the way we give birth, the way we die. Science governs every aspect of our lives. But can we trust politicians to make the right decisions for us about those vital issues? Former government chief scientist and president of the Royal Society, Lord May, examines the crucial but uneasy relationship between politics and science.

The Making of Modern Medicine

Episode 10: Anatomy and the Invisible Hand

BBC Radio 4
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15 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:

How did this period come to be known as 'the perfection of anatomy'?

How did this period come to be known as 'the perfection of anatomy' and secure one of the few medical disciplines that would survive the upheaval that was about to engulf Europe?

A major new narrative history series exploring over 2,000 years of western medicine, written and presented by medical historian Andrew Cunningham.

10/30. Anatomy and the Invisible Hand

Anatomy teaching was big business in the 1700s. Anatomists such as the ambitious William Hunter hoped to profit by supplying anatomical teaching – but in doing so created a huge and unsavoury demand for fresh bodies for use by medical students.

Amid rivalry and huge public debates, every anatomist wanted to make some new discovery and build a reputation. So how did this period come to be known as 'the perfection of anatomy' and secure one of the few medical disciplines that would survive the political upheaval that was about to engulf Europe?

The readers are David Rintoul, Peter Capaldi, Jason Watkins and Scott Handy.

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:

Francine Stock talks to Edgar Wright, director of Shaun of the Dead.

Francine Stock talks to Edgar Wright, director of Shaun of the Dead, about his new film Hot Fuzz, a police comedy set in rural Gloucestershire.

A Point of View

Fidgets on the March

BBC Radio 4
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10 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Clive James rails against changes to the names of things we rely on.

Clive James rails against changes to the names of things we rely on - such as railways and the Royal Mail - as a type of costly and annoying ‘fidgeting’. He points to other disturbing developments in what he sees as a growing misuse of language.

Genre

Profile

Duncan Fletcher

BBC Radio 4
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15 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Christopher Martin-Jenkins profiles Zimbabwean Duncan Fletcher, England's cricket coach.

Christopher Martin-Jenkins profiles the Zimbabwean who's presided over both one of English cricket's greatest triumphs and humiliating defeats, Duncan Fletcher.

Duncan Fletcher became a national hero in 2005 when his England cricket team defeated Australia to take the Ashes for the first time in a generation.

Little more than a year later he'd turned into a national villain. England had surrendered the Ashes in the most humiliating fashion, beaten 5-0 Down Under. Then they looked utterly lost in the one-day series that followed, as they suffered defeat after defeat.

But suddenly the team turned the cricket world on its head by defeating Australia in the finals to win the one-day tournament in Sydney, and raised hopes that they would mount a decent challenge in the World Cup in March. It could be Fletcher's last tour as England coach.

Christopher Martin-Jenkins profiles the Zimbabwean who's presided over both one of England's greatest triumphs and humiliating defeats.

Brand

Profile

Open Book

Lesley Pearse, Meg Hutchinson and Book Websites

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Mariella Frostrup investigates sagas, and talks to best-selling novelist Lesley Pearse.

Mariella Frostrup investigates sagas. She talks to best-selling novelists Lesley Pearse and Meg Hutchinson. Plus, Jason Jenkins highlights some of the best book sites on the web.

Mariella Frostrup talks to saga writers Lesley Pearse and Meg Hutchinson, whose books make regular appearances in the bestseller charts, about the appeal of the genre. And, internet expert Jason Jenkins guides technophobe literary editor Suzi Feay through the best book sites on the web.

Brand

Open Book

Open Book

Mirza Waheed on The Book of Gold Leaves

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Featuring Mirza Waheed on his new novel The Book of Gold Leaves.

Kashmiri novelist Mirza Waheed talks to Mariella Frostrup about his new novel The Book of Gold Leaves, a love story set against the backdrop of war and Anne Rice on a precious book.

Mirza Waheed is a Kashmiri novelist whose new book, The Book of Gold Leaves, is a Romeo and Juliet style love story set in war-torn 1990s Srinigar. He talks to Mariella about whether he feels a responsibility to write about his home country and the conflict there. Also on the programme, vampire chronicler Anne Rice reveals the book she'd never lend and why it informs her work. And the novelist Tessa Hadley and Dr Sarah Dillon discuss the joys of forensic dissection of texts as we begin a new series: Close Reading - examining how great writing works.

Credits

Presenter
Mariella Frostrup
Interviewed Guest
Mirza Waheed
Interviewed Guest
Anne Rice
Interviewed Guest
Tessa Hadley
Interviewed Guest
Dr Sarah Dillon

Brand

Open Book

Great Lives

Series 2 Mother Teresa

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Comedian Bernard Manning assesses the achievements of Mother Teresa of Calcutta.

Comedian Bernard Manning assesses the achievements of Mother Teresa of Calcutta. With Humphrey Carpenter and biographer Anne Sebba. From October 2002.

Comedian Bernard Manning chooses Mother Theresa of Calcutta. With Humphrey Carpenter.

The biographical series in which a distinguished guest chooses someone who's inspired their life. Will their hero stand up to intensive scrutiny and merit the description of having led a great life? From October 2002.

Great Lives

Series 2 Erasmus Darwin

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Paul Nurse discusses scientist, inventor and poet Erasmus Darwin, grandfather of Charles.

Paul Nurse discusses Erasmus Darwin, grandfather of Charles, who came up with a theory of evolution decades before his famous grandson. With Humphrey Carpenter. From October 2002.

Nobel prize winning scientist Sir Paul Nurse chooses Charles Darwin's grandfather, Erasmus. With Humphrey Carpenter.

The biographical series in which a distinguished guest chooses someone who's inspired their life. Will their hero stand up to intensive scrutiny and merit the description of having led a great life? From 2002.

Great Lives

Series 2 CLR James

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Darcus Howe discusses his uncle, the sportsman, writer and revolutionary CLR James.

4 Extra Debut. Writer and broadcaster Darcus Howe discusses his uncle, the Trinidadian sportsman, writer and revolutionary CLR James, with host Humphrey Carpenter. From Nov 2002.

Darcus Howe chooses activist and philosopher CLR James, with help from his biographer Farrukh Dhondy. Presented by Humphrey Carpenter.

The biographical series in which a distinguished guest chooses someone who's inspired their life. Will their hero stand up to intensive scrutiny and merit the description of having led a great life? From 2002.

Great Lives

Series 2 Rachel Carson

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Writer Bea Campbell chooses pioneering environmental protection scientist Rachel Carson.

4 Extra Debut. Writer Bea Campbell chooses pioneering environmental protection scientist Rachel Carson, author of Silent Spring. With Humphrey Carpenter. From November 2002.

Writer Bea Campbell chooses pioneering environmental protection scientist Rachel Carson. With Humphrey Carpenter.

The biographical series in which a distinguished guest chooses someone who's inspired their life. Will their hero stand up to intensive scrutiny and merit the description of having led a great life? From 2002.

Great Lives

Series 2 MR James

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Muriel Gray and Christopher Frayling discuss the life of ghost story writer MR James.

4 Extra Debut. Muriel Gray and Christopher Frayling discuss the life of ghost story writer MR James. With Humphrey Carpenter. From November 2002.

Writer and broadcaster Muriel Gray chooses ghost story writer, MR James. With Humphrey Carpenter.

The biographical series in which a distinguished guest chooses someone who's inspired their life. Will their hero stand up to intensive scrutiny and merit the description of having led a great life? From 2002.

Great Lives

Series 2 Umm Kulthum

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Novelist Ahdaf Soueif chooses acclaimed Egyptian singer Umm Kulthum as his great life.

4 Extra Debut. Novelist Ahdaf Soueif chooses acclaimed Egyptian singer Umm Kulthum as his great life. With Humphrey Carpenter. From November 2002.

Novelist Ahdaf Soueif chooses legendary Egyptian singer, Umm Kulthum. With Humphrey Carpenter.

The biographical series in which a distinguished guest chooses someone who's inspired their life. Will their hero stand up to intensive scrutiny and merit the description of having led a great life? From 2002.

Great Lives

Series 2 Benedict Spinoza

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Nobel Prize-winning chemist Sir Harry Kroto chooses the philosopher Benedict Spinoza.

Nobel Prize-winning chemist Sir Harry Kroto chooses the philosopher Benedict Spinoza. Biographical discussion series with Humphrey Carpenter. From November 2002.

Nobel Prize-winning chemist Sir Harry Kroto chooses the philosopher Spinoza. With Humphrey Carpenter.

The biographical series in which a distinguished guest chooses someone who's inspired their life. Will their hero stand up to intensive scrutiny and merit the description of having led a great life? From 2002.

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