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The Marvel Universe, Libraries today, Kizzy Crawford and Gwilym Simcock

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Avengers: Infinity War - the latest offering from Marvel - and the role of libraries today

Superheroes assemble in Marvel's latest, Avengers: Infinity War, the role of libraries with Salley Vickers and Mik Scarlet, plus musicians Kizzy Crawford and Gwilym Simcock.

Avengers: Infinity War is released in cinemas today. Fans have been counting the days until the film's release, but what does this ambitious high-budget offering reveal about the state of the hugely successful Marvel Cinematic Universe? Mik Scarlet and Larushka Ivan-Zadeh consider the bigger picture.

At a time when many libraries across the UK are facing an uncertain future, Salley Vickers has gone back to the 1950s for her new novel The Librarian. Salley, and Peter Gaw who runs Nottinghamshire's libraries, consider how the role of the library has changed and adapted to a modern world, and the challenge they face today.

Two Welsh musicians - singer Kizzy Crawford and pianist and composer Gwilym Simcock - perform from their new album Cân Yr Adar, or Birdsong. They talk about their collaboration, which also involves Sinfonia Cymru, and how they were inspired by the landscape and wildlife of Carngafallt, the nature reserve in mid-Wales, known as the Celtic rainforest.

Presenter Stig Abell

Producer Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Presenter
Stig Abell
Interviewed Guest
Mik Scarlet
Interviewed Guest
Larushka Ivan-Zadeh
Interviewed Guest
Salley Vickers
Interviewed Guest
Peter Gaw
Interviewed Guest
Kizzy Crawford
Interviewed Guest
Gwilym Simcock
Performer
Kizzy Crawford
Performer
Gwilym Simcock
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

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On Chesil Beach with Ian McEwan, Older people and the arts, Drew McOnie

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Ian McEwan on bringing his novel On Chesil Beach to the big screen.

Novelist Ian McEwan on adapting On Chesil Beach for the cinema, older people and the arts and Strictly Ballroom's director and choreographer, Drew McOnie.

Ian McEwan discusses the process of adapting his novel On Chesil Beach for the big screen. Set in 1962, it tells the story of two young newlyweds spending their honeymoon preoccupied with - and terrified by - the forthcoming consummation of their marriage.

Drew McOnie talks about directing and choreographing the first UK staging of Strictly Ballroom: The Musical, based on the much-loved 1992 Baz Luhrmann film that led to a resurgence of ballroom dancing in popular culture.

A recent DCMS survey shows that over-65s are increasingly engaged in the arts. Two members of the Elders Theatre Company at the Royal Exchange in Manchester talk about how they not only go to more events since retiring but are actively participating in the arts. And David Cutler of the funding organisation the Baring Foundation and David Slater of arts company Entelechy discuss the benefits of an interest in the arts for older people.

Presenter Stig Abell

Producer Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Presenter
Stig Abell
Interviewed Guest
Ian McEwan
Interviewed Guest
Drew McOnie
Interviewed Guest
David Cutler
Interviewed Guest
David Slater
Producer
Jerome Weatherald
Interviewed Guest
Gordon Emerson
Interviewed Guest
Christine Connor

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Male full-frontal nudity, Chris Lang, Stuart Hall's memoirs

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Why is male full-frontal nudity so rare on screen?

Arts news, interviews and reviews. Male nudity on screen discussed, Chris Lang, writer of new ITV drama Innocent and the memoirs of cultural theorist Stuart Hall.

Michael Fassbender was reportedly happy to be filmed completely naked in the film Shame, but compared with female nudity, male full-frontal shots are still rare on screen. What are the reasons for this disparity and what are the certification issues with representation of the male organ? The BBFC's David Austin and film critics Hannah McGill and Ryan Gilbey consider the long and the short of it.

Chris Lang, the critically-acclaimed writer and creator of ITV's Unforgotten, talks about his latest crime drama Innocent, starring Hermione Norris and Lee Ingleby.

Stuart Hall was a Jamaican-born cultural theorist, political activist and Marxist sociologist who arrived in Britain three years after the Empire Windrush in 1951 and was one of the founding figures of the school of thought that is now known as The Birmingham School of Cultural Studies. Gilane Tawadros and Professor Kurt Burling discuss what his memoir Familiar Stranger reveals about the man, as well as the impact his work has had on the way Britain's cultural life is understood.

Presenter: Stig Abell

Producer: Edwina Pitman.

Credits

Presenter
Stig Abell
Interviewed Guest
David Austin
Interviewed Guest
Hannah McGill
Interviewed Guest
Ryan Gilbey
Interviewed Guest
Chris Lang
Interviewed Guest
Gilane Tawadros
Interviewed Guest
Kurt Burling
Producer
Edwina Pitman

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Hamlet and As You Like It at Shakespeare's Globe, Mysterious Marginalia, Morris Dance Music

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Hamlet and As You Like It, Michelle Terry's first productions at The Globe.

Reviews of Hamlet and As You Like It, the first productions under Michelle Terry's new regime at Shakespeare Globe and mysterious marks in books and the significance of marginalia.

Shakespeare's Globe found itself in a storm of controversy when Artistic Director Emma Rice left the theatre amid objections to her use of modern lighting and amplification. In her stead the actor Michelle Terry was appointed and her first two productions, As You Like It and Hamlet, have just opened. Terry takes the title role in Hamlet but the approach is a resolutely ensemble one, with casting across gender, disability and ethnicity. Are these productions a radical new approach or are they back-to-basics Shakespeare? Critics Kate Maltby and Susannah Clapp give their verdicts.

The marginalia in the philosopher John Stewart Mill's 1700 volume library is being digitised, revealing an unknown side of this reticent man. We look at the history of marginalia, and consider what our own attitudes to writing on books reveal about their changing significance. Biographer Kathryn Hughes and Bill Sherman, a historian of reading, discuss writing in the margins - and confess to their own guilty scribblings. And...a few weeks into her new job Dundee library assistant Georgia Grainger discovered a secret code in some library books - what lay behind it, and why did her tweet about it go viral?

Will Pound is a harmonica and melodeon virtuoso - and dancer. His latest CD, 'Through the Seasons', ranges through the year and the country, from the Cotswolds to Shetland. The album, and his show, is a celebration of the variety of Morris and other folk dance music. Will tells Stig Abell about rapper music (in the pub not the 'hood), clog percussion, and the melodies Border and Cotswold Morris. He demonstrates, playing live in the studio. And there's a special tune for the Royal Wedding, one Meghan could skip down the aisle to.

Presenter: Stig Abell

Producer: Julian May.

Credits

Presenter
Stig Abell
Interviewed Guest
Kate Maltby
Interviewed Guest
Susannah Clapp
Interviewed Guest
Kathryn Hughes
Interviewed Guest
Bill Sherman
Interviewed Guest
Georgina Grainger
Interviewed Guest
Will Pound
Performer
Will Pound
Producer
Julian May

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Ian McKellen, The Handmaid's Tale Season 2, Bill Gold remembered, Tishani Doshi

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Ian McKellen on life as an actor, review of The Handmaid's Tale Season 2, Tishani Doshi.

Ian McKellen on his acting career and gay rights work, Julia Raeside reviews The Handmaid's Tale, Season 2, Bill Gold remembered, plus Tishani Doshi reads some of her poems.

Ian McKellen looks back on his acting career and his work as a gay rights activist as a new documentary film comes out about his life.

Critic Julia Raeside reviews season 2 of The Handmaid's Tale, which has just started on Channel 4.

Bill Gold - the creator of some of the most memorable classic movie posters from the early 1940s until 2011, including Casablanca, Alien and Dirty Harry - died yesterday, aged 97. Publisher and vintage movie poster specialist Tony Nourmand remembers the man whose motto was 'Less is more'.

Poet, writer, and dancer Tishani Doshi talks about her new poetry collection, The Girls Are Coming Out of the Woods, which was inspired in part by the murder of a close friend. The poems consider how women's bodies are treated, and explore themes of anger, love and loss as well as ways to find hope and strength in the modern world.

Presenter: Stig Abell

Producer: Rebecca Armstrong.

Credits

Presenter
Stig Abell
Interviewed Guest
Ian McKellen
Interviewed Guest
Julia Raeside
Interviewed Guest
Tony Nourmand
Interviewed Guest
Tishani Doshi
Producer
Rebecca Armstrong

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Dame Cleo Laine

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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At the age of 90, jazz singer Dame Cleo Laine looks back at her extraordinary career.

At the age of ninety jazz singer Dame Cleo Laine looks back at her extraordinary career.

She talks to Stig Abell about her lasting musical and romantic partnership with saxophonist and composer Sir John Dankworth, her friendship with Ella Fitzgerald and collaboration with Ray Charles.

Stig visits Cleo at her countryside home, where in 1970 she and husband John Dankworth created The Stables concert hall in their back garden and meets Cleo's daughter, the singer Jacqui Dankworth.

Presenter: Stig Abell

Producer: Timothy Prosser.

Credits

Interviewed Guest
Cleo Laine
Interviewed Guest
Jacqui Dankworth
Presenter
Stig Abell
Producer
Timothy Prosser

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Orlando Bloom, Grief as muse, Antony Gormley, Novello Award-winning rapper Dave.

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Orlando Bloom on his return to the stage as a cop and assassin in Killer Joe.

Orlando Bloom on playing a cop with a sideline - assassination, comedy inspired by grief, Antony Gormley's new show and rappers winning prizes - for their poetry or their politics?

Orlando Bloom swaps Middle-earth and the high seas for a Texas trailer park in his first West End production in over a decade, Killer Joe. He talks about playing Joe Cooper, a policeman turned assassin, employed by a family at their wits end to kill their mother for a cut of her life insurance money.

Is death, the 'last taboo', finally being broken down by the arts? We consider the recent glut of writing and performance about grief with Cariad Lloyd, whose podcast Griefcast, in which she talks to fellow comedians about losing someone, swept the board at the recent British Podcast Awards. Stig is also joined by writer Kim Sherwood whose debut novel Testament is about family secrets and mourning the death of a grandfather.

It has been a winning week for rap as Kenrick Lamar, Stormzy and Dave are all awarded prestigious song-writing prizes. We ask whether it's about the music, or the message, the poetry or the politics?

In Antony Gormley's new exhibition, Subject, at the recently redesigned Kettle's Yard in Cambridge, the artist continues his investigations into the relationships between the human body and space. Critic Richard Cork gives his response to the works, some of which are new, and others not previously exhibited in the UK.

Presenter: Stig Abell

Producer: Julian May.

Credits

Presenter
Stig Abell
Interviewed Guest
Orlando Bloom
Interviewed Guest
Cariad Lloyd
Interviewed Guest
Kim Sherwood
Interviewed Guest
Jacqueline Springer
Interviewed Guest
Richard Cork
Producer
Julian May

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Royal Academy Summer Exhibition, Shebeen in Nottingham, Will Sharpe, Vampyr video game

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

The 250th Royal Academy Summer Exhibition opens and is reviewed by Jacky Klein.

250th Royal Academy Summer Exhibition reviewed; Shebeen, a play about the 1950s immigrant community in Nottingham; Will Sharpe of dark comedy Flowers; and Vampyr video game tested.

The Royal Academy Summer Exhibition opens on 12th June. It has been held every year without interruption since 1769 providing a platform for emerging and established artists. This year it is co-ordinated by Grayson Perry with the theme "Art Made Now". Art historian Jacky Klein joins Stig to review the exhibition.

Shebeen is a new play set amongst the Caribbean community in 1950s Nottingham. Inspired by the Windrush generation and written by local playwright Mufaro Makubika, the drama deals with an immigrant Jamaican couple and the forbidden parties they throw at their shebeen - an illegal bar set up in their home. Writer Mufaro Makubika and director Matthew Xia discuss its relevance now.

The offbeat comedy Flowers, about the dysfunctional family of a children's writer, starring Olivia Coleman and Julian Barratt, returns to Channel 4 for a second season. The Anglo-Japanese writer Will Sharpe, who also directed and acts in it, is in the studio to discuss its dark humour.

We review Vampyr, the action role-playing video game with a moral dilemma at its heart which is released today. Jonathan Reid is a vampiric doctor whose thirst for blood compels him to kill innocent people, but how does that sit with his Hippocratic Oath? Games reviewer Jordan Erica Webber joins Stig to play the game and offers her verdict.

Presenter: Stig Abell

Producer: Harry Parker.

Credits

Presenter
Stig Abell
Interviewed Guest
Jacky Klein
Interviewed Guest
Mufaro Makubika
Interviewed Guest
Matthew Xia
Interviewed Guest
Will Sharpe
Interviewed Guest
Jordan Erica Webber
Producer
Harry Parker

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Caitlin Moran, Beyonce and Jay-Z's new album, National Youth Folk Ensemble, Frank Styles

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:

Caitlin Moran on her latest novel How to be Famous about fame, Britpop and revenge porn.

Caitlin Moran on her latest novel How to be Famous about fame, Britpop and revenge porn and is the new Beyonce and Jay-Z album more than a publicity stunt?

Caitlin Moran talks about writing her second novel, a characteristically candid and comic account of a young woman's misadventures in 1990s London at the height of Britpop. How to Be Famous, the follow up to Moran's 2014 debut How to Build a Girl, centres around an instance of revenge porn and its protagonist Dolly's novel means of fighting back.

Superstars Beyoncé and Jay-Z, now billed collectively as 'The Carters', unexpectedly released their first collaborative album Everything is Love over the weekend. Natty Kasambala, music contributor for gal-dem magazine reviews.

As part of the Great Exhibition of the North, freehand spray painter Frank Styles has created a 150-metre-long mural that showcases the North's impact on modern Britain. Fifty Northern Icons is based on an eclectic range of images chosen by the public, from York Minster to Gregg's Steak Bakes.

The National Youth Folk Ensemble is about to accept its third intake of musicians aged 14 to 18. We meet two young players who if accepted to the group will learn entirely by ear, guided by tutors who are themselves well-known musicians. The artistic director, fiddle player Sam Sweeney, explains how the ensemble is dedicated to raising the standard of players as well as the profile and popularity of English traditional music.

Presenter: Stig Abell

Producer: Hannah Robins.

Credits

Presenter
Stig Abell
Interviewed Guest
Caitlin Moran
Interviewed Guest
Natty Kasambala
Interviewed Guest
Sam Sweeney
Producer
Hannah Robins

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Lee Miller and Surrealism in Britain, GLOW star Kate Nash, Pop-up arts

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Singer and GLOW star Kate Nash, and model-turned-photographer Lee Miller and Surrealism.

Lee Miller and Surrealism in Britain at the Hepworth Wakefield, English singer Kate Nash on her role in the wrestling TV drama GLOW, and pop-up arts in the UK.

The American photographer and former model Lee Miller had a leading role in championing Surrealism in Britain in the 1930s, which is the focus of a new exhibition at the Hepworth Wakefield. The show's curator Lauren Barnes, and Lee Miller's son Antony Penrose, consider her fascination for Surrealism and the artists involved, including Man Ray, Max Ernst and Salvador Dalí.

Singer Kate Nash discusses dealing with fame after the success of her debut album Made of Bricks and the mega hit single Foundations. She explains how learning to wrestle for her role in Netflix comedy GLOW rebuilt her confidence and how her new album, Yesterday Was Forever, was inspired by her teenage diary.

Pop-up restaurants, which appear in empty shops and car parks, have enlivened our food culture, and even had a rejuvenating impact on neighbourhoods. There are also pop-up galleries, music performance spaces and even, in York, a whole pop-up Shakespeare theatre and village. Cat Gardiner who has run pop-up galleries in Cardiff, the musician Sam Lee who is taking concerts out of buildings and putting them around campfires, and James Cundall, the man behind Shakespeare's Rose Theatre in York, discuss the impact of arts pop-ups.

Credits

Presenter
Stig Abell
Producer
Jerome Weatherald
Interviewed Guest
Kate Nash
Interviewed Guest
Cat Gardiner
Interviewed Guest
Sam Lee
Interviewed Guest
James Cundall
Interviewed Guest
Lauren Barnes
Interviewed Guest
Antony Penrose

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Japan Special: Ryuichi Sakomoto, Japanese Short Stories, Sou Fujimoto

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Ryuichi Sakomoto on his extraordinary career in music and beyond.

Ryuichi Sakomoto on his inspirations, Sou Fujimoto on bringing nature into architecture, plus Japanese short stories and novel recommendations.

A Japanese-themed edition of Front Row as the Oscar-winning composer Ryuichi Sakamoto, whose scores include Merry Christmas Mr Lawrence and The Last Emperor, talks to Stig about being inspired by nature, and how he came back from treatment for throat cancer to write the music for The Revenant.

The editor of The Penguin Book of Japanese Short Stories, Jay Rubin, tells how he curated the selection and reflects on his career as one of Haruki Murakami's main translators. And Junko Takekawa, Senior Arts Programme Officer at the Japan Foundation and a guest curator at this year's Cheltenham Festival of Literature, selects some of her favourite Japanese novels.

The architect Sou Fujimoto describes how the boundaries between nature and buildings, inside and outside, inspire his work - and reveals the artistic potential of a pile of crisps!

Presenter: Stig Abell

Producer: Sarah Johnson.

Credits

Presenter
Stig Abell
Interviewed Guest
Ryuichi Sakamoto
Interviewed Guest
Jay Rubin
Interviewed Guest
Junko Takekawa
Interviewed Guest
Sou Fujimoto
Producer
Sarah Johnson

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Maxine Peake, Gillian Lynne remembered, Whitney documentaries

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Maxine Peake on her new play Queens of the Coal Age, and a tribute to Dame Gillian Lynne.

Maxine Peake on her new play Queens of the Coal Age. Elaine Paige, Cameron Mackintosh and Arlene Phillips discuss Gillian Lynne's work and legacy, plus Whitney film documentaries.

Maxine Peake discusses her new stage play, Queens of the Coal Age, which dramatizes the incident in 1993 when, armed with wet wipes and nicotine gum, Anne Scargill led a group of women to occupy Parkside Colliery in protest against pit closures.

The acclaimed dancer and choreographer, Gillian Lynne, has died aged 92. Best known for Cats and The Phantom of the Opera, she worked on more than 60 shows on Broadway and in the West End. Elaine Paige, Cameron Mackintosh and choreographer Arlene Phillips pay tribute.

Kevin Macdonald's film Whitney is released this week, the second documentary in just over a year looking at the icon's life (and demise). While Macdonald's new film is officially supported by the late singer's estate, Nick Broomfield's 2017 Whitney: Can I Be Me?, was unauthorised. Critic Grace Barber-Plentie considers how access and the involvement of the family affected the feeling of the film, and whether the chorus of interviewed voices bought us any closer to understanding Whitney Houston.

Presenter: Stig Abell

Producer: Rebecca Armstrong.

Credits

Presenter
Stig Abell
Interviewed Guest
Maxine Peake
Interviewed Guest
Elaine Paige
Interviewed Guest
Cameron Mackintosh
Interviewed Guest
Arlene Phillips
Interviewed Guest
Grace Barber-Plentie
Producer
Rebecca Armstrong

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Rob Brydon on Swimming With Men, Laura Wade, Ferens Art Gallery

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Rob Brydon on the set of film Swimming With Men, playwright Laura Wade, Claude Lanzmann.

On the set of Swimming With Men with Rob Brydon and Daniel Mays, Laura Wade, writer of Home, I'm Darling, final report on Art Fund Museum of the Year from Ferens Art Gallery, Hull.

Rob Brydon, Daniel Mays and Adeel Akhtar were among the actors spending long hours in swimming pools last summer rehearsing for, and shooting, the new British film Swimming With Men, based on a true story about a group of male synchronised swimmers competing in the world championships. Stig Abell reports from the set at Basildon swimming pool, which was masquerading as Milan, the venue for the finals.

Laura Wade, the playwright behind Posh and the stage adaption of Tipping the Velvet, discusses Home, I'm Darling, her new a play about a modern couple trying emulate the happy domesticity of the 1950s.

With the announcement of the winner of the £100,000 Art Fund Museum of the Year 2018 later this evening, we have our final report from the five finalists. So far we've heard from Brooklands Museum in Weybridge, Glasgow Women's Library, The Postal Museum in London, and Tate St Ives. Tonight we visit Ferens Art Gallery in Hull, which was at the heart of Hull UK City of Culture last year.

Filmmaker and writer Claude Lanzmann, famous for Shoah - his 1985 epic exploration of the Holocaust, has died. He's remembered by the writer and cultural critic Agnes Poirier.

Presenter Stig Abell

Producer Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Presenter
Stig Abell
Interviewed Guest
Rob Brydon
Interviewed Guest
Daniel Mays
Interviewed Guest
Adeel Akhtar
Interviewed Guest
Laura Wade
Interviewed Guest
Agnes Poirier
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

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Singer Olly Alexander, Veteran documentary filmmaker Frederick Wiseman, Can a critic call an actor overweight?

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Olly Alexander from Years and Years discusses the band's new album Palo Santo and performs

Olly Alexander talks about and performs a song from Years and Years' new album Palo Santo, which chronicles his life as a gay man, has a sci-fi setting, yet remains catchy pop.

Theatre criticism has been in the dock recently after a reviewer was publicly reproached for mentioning an actor's weight. Critics Sarah Crompton and Quentin Letts debate whether reviewers should feel free to assess an actor's body as well as their performance.

Olly Alexander from Years and Years discusses the band's new album, Palo Santo, which combines a sci-fi setting with a visceral account of his life as a gay man. And he performs a song from the new release.

Veteran American documentary filmmaker Frederick Wiseman delves into the world of the New York Public Library in his 42nd documentary, EX LIBRIS. The honorary Oscar winner tells Stig Abell about film-making at 88 years of age, and why he chooses to do all of the research, shooting and editing himself.

Presenter: Stig Abell

Producer: Julian May

Main Image: Olly Alexander. Credit: Years and Years.

Credits

Presenter
Stig Abell
Interviewed Guest
Sarah Crompton
Interviewed Guest
Quentin Letts
Interviewed Guest
Olly Alexander
Interviewed Guest
Frederick Wiseman
Performer
Olly Alexander
Producer
Julian May

Brand

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Peter Kosminsky on The State, Ben Whishaw, The secrets of Vermeer's studio

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Peter Kosminsky on his new jihadi drama; Ben Whishaw on playing an aerospace billionaire.

Peter Kosminsky on his new drama The State, a portrayal of life inside IS; Ben Whishaw on his new play, Against; an exploration of how Vermeer achieved his luminous paintings.

Peter Kosminsky talks to Stig about his new drama The State, which follows four British men and women who travel to Syria to join the so-called Islamic State. Kosminsky made his reputation with difficult drama documentaries and the storylines in The State are all based on documented events. As writer and director, he discusses the challenges of humanising these characters, and the decision to focus on portraying life inside IS.

Did Vermeer really use a camera obscura to help him paint? Artist Jane Jelley explains how she recreated 17th century painting techniques to find out the truth behind the Dutch Master's luminous paintings.

And in his new stage role Ben Whishaw plays Luke, your average Silicon Valley aerospace billionaire...until God tells him to 'go where there is violence', and he sets out to change the world. With Ben Whishaw and the director Ian Rickson, Stig delves into the ideas and issues in their new play, Against.

Presenter: Stig Abell

Producer: Ella-mai Robey.

Credits

Interviewed Guest
Peter Kosminsky
Interviewed Guest
Jane Jelley
Interviewed Guest
Ben Whishaw
Interviewed Guest
Ian Rickson
Presenter
Stig Abell
Producer
Ella-mai Robey

Brand

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Ronnie Wood, Shakespeare plays on screen, Taylor Swift's new song, Peter Hoeg

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Ronnie Wood on his paintings; Cinematic adaptions of Shakespeare; Taylor Swift's new song.

Rolling Stones guitarist Ronnie Wood on paintings; we look at problems of adapting Shakespeare for film; Taylor Swift's Look What You Made Me Do reviewed; Danish writer Peter Hoeg.

Rolling Stones guitarist Ronnie Wood discusses his passion for painting, drawing and sculpture. In the year that marks his seventieth birthday, he tells Stig Abell how his relationship with art began.

Veteran director James Ivory claimed this week he was struggling to get investors for his film Richard II, because financiers feared that no money could be made from films based on Shakespeare's plays. We ask film-maker Anne Beresford and Jerry Brotton, Professor of Renaissance literature, if there is a problem adapting the Bard for the big screen.

After a social-media purge and a lot of speculation, Taylor Swift has released the first single from her new album, Reputation. Kate Mossman gives her verdict on What You Made Me Do, a song that credits Right Said Fred for an interpolation of the melody from their 1991 hit I'm Too Sexy.

Danish writer Peter Hoeg found fame with his second novel, Miss Smilla's Feeling For Snow. He talks about his new novel, The Susan Effect, which, like his most famous book, focuses on a woman who risks everything to get to the truth.

Presenter: Stig Abell

Producer: Kate Bullivant.

Credits

Presenter
Stig Abell
Interviewed Guest
Ronnie Wood
Interviewed Guest
Anne Beresford
Interviewed Guest
Jerry Brotton
Interviewed Guest
Kate Mossman
Interviewed Guest
Peter Hoeg
Producer
Kate Bullivant

Brand

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Authors' better, but not-so-famous, books; Kathryn Bigelow; Eric Ravilious; a Shakespeare Sonnet in Pidgin

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Not-so-famous but better books; Kathryn Bigelow; Eric Ravilious; a great sonnet in Pidgin.

A discussion of books better than their authors' best known; Kathryn Bigelow on why her new film, set in 1967, is urgent now; the English artist Eric Ravilious; a poem in Pidgin.

Oscar-winning director Kathryn Bigelow's new film is set during the five days of unrest that took place in Detroit in 1967. The drama is based on first hand recollections, police records and eye-witness accounts of the race-riots. Bigelow talks to Front Row about why these 50-year-old events feel as contemporary and urgent as ever.

75 years ago the English painter, war artist, designer, book illustrator and wood engraver Eric William Ravilious was killed aged 39 when the aircraft he was in was lost off the coast of Iceland. Many of his works are seen as capturing a sense of Englishness that existed between the wars. He also designed many popular pieces for Wedgwood including a commemorative mug for the abortive Coronation of Edward VIII and the Alphabet Mug of 1937. Art critic Richard Cork explains the significance of his work and the artist design movement he was part of.

Famous for the wrong book. It's 170 years since Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre was published, 160 years since Flaubert published Madam Bovary and 50 since Gabriel Garcia Marquez's One Hundred Years of Solitude but are they their writer's best book? Critics Kevin Jackson and Alex Clark show off their literary knowledge of the famous writers whose "other" books we may have never heard of - and certainly not read - but possibly should have done.

The BBC has just opened a service broadcasting to the 75 million people of West Africa who speak Pidgin. Stig Abell talks to one of the reporters, Helen Oyibo, about the language and its literature, and hears Shakespeare's Sonnet 18, 'Shall I Compare Thee to a Summer's Day' translated into Pidgin by Oyibo especially for Front Row.

Presenter: Stig Abell

Producer: Julian May.

Credits

Interviewed Guest
Kathryn Bigelow
Interviewed Guest
Richard Cork
Interviewed Guest
Kevin Jackson
Interviewed Guest
Alex Clark
Interviewed Guest
Helen Oyibo
Presenter
Stig Abell
Producer
Julian May

Brand

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Matt Lucas on his memoir, Tamsin Greig and Martin Freeman on Labour of Love

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Matt Lucas talks to Stig Abell about his memoir. Plus Martin Freeman and Tamsin Greig.

Matt Lucas talks to Stig Abell about his memoir. And Tamsin Greig and Martin Freeman discuss Labour of Love, a new play by James Graham about the Labour Party.

Matt Lucas talks to Stig Abell about his autobiography 'Little Me: My life from A-Z', in which he writes about the challenges of his childhood, his start on the comedy circuit 25 years ago, and the phenomenal success of TV show Little Britain.

Tamsin Greig and Martin Freeman discuss James Graham's new play Labour of Love, about the three decade battle between old and new Labour in a North Nottinghamshire constituency, in which they play a labour party agent and an MP.

Jacky Klein on the surprising relationship between the father of conceptual art Marcel Duchamp, and the surrealist Salvador Dali, the subject of a new exhibition at the Royal Academy.

Presenter: Stig Abell

Producer: Timothy Prosser.

Credits

Presenter
Stig Abell
Interviewed Guest
Matt Lucas
Interviewed Guest
Tamsin Greig
Interviewed Guest
Martin Freeman
Interviewed Guest
Jacky Klein
Producer
Timothy Prosser

Brand

Front Row

Front Row

Audre Lorde, Dan Brown, Art Connoisseurship, Harvey Weinstein

BBC Radio 4
BBC Radio 4 logo
30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Author Dan Brown discusses the return of Robert Langdon in his latest novel, Origin.

Arts news, interviews and reviews. Author Dan Brown discusses the return of Robert Langdon in his latest novel, Origin. Plus Audre Lorde and art connoisseurship.

Audre Lorde described herself as "black, lesbian, mother, warrior, poet". A writer of the 70s and 80s, this month her poetry and prose is published in the UK for the first time in a new anthology: Your Silence Will Not Protect You. Akwugo Emejulu, Professor of Sociology at the University of Warwick discusses the resurgent interest in Lorde's work and her importance to contemporary activists

Dan Brown came to the fame in 2003 with his novel The Da Vinci Code which became a worldwide bestseller and a Hollywood movie. As his latest book, Origin, is published, Brown discusses his new novel's exploration of the tension between science and religion, and the appeal of his protagonist, Professor Robert Langdon, who seems never happier than when he's fleeing for his life in search of esoteric clues to labyrinthine mysteries.

Dr Bendor Grosvenor, art dealer and presenter of Britain's Lost Masterpieces, argues that we are at risk of losing the skill of connoisseurship - being able to determine the painter simply by looking at the painting, which is key when attributing a work to a particular artist. Professor Alison Wright, head of the History of Art Department at UCL, joins him to discuss if this skill really is dying out and how important it is.

We discuss the breaking news that Harvey Weinstein, the Oscar-winning film producer, has been fired by the board of his company after being accused of sexually harassing female employees and actresses over nearly three decades. Mia Galuppo of the Hollywood Reporter and Anne Helen Petersen, senior culture writer at Buzzfeed, who has written a Phd on The History of Celebrity Gossip, join Stig to unpack the story.

Presenter: Stig Abell

Producer: Hannah Robins.

Credits

Presenter
Stig Abell
Interviewed Guest
Dan Brown
Interviewed Guest
Akwugo Emejulu
Interviewed Guest
Bendor Grosvenor
Interviewed Guest
Alison Wright
Interviewed Guest
MIa Galuppo
Interviewed Guest
Anne Helen Petersen
Producer
Hannah Robins

Brand

Front Row

Front Row

George Michael: Freedom, John Banville, Michael Fassbender, Performance art

BBC Radio 4
BBC Radio 4 logo
30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

George Michael's film - Freedom, John Banville, Michael Fassbender and performance art.

Kate Mossman reviews George Michael - Freedom, John Banville discusses his latest novel, Mrs Osmond and Michael Fassbender talks about The Snowman.

Kate Mossman reviews George Michael: Freedom, the film George Michael was working when he died, in which he and a host of A-List names talk about his songs, his career, his relationships and his battles with the music industry.

The Irish writer John Banville is the highly acclaimed winner of the 2005 Man Booker Prize, The Sea. His novels include The Book of Evidence, Ghosts and now, Mrs Osmond. It's a sequel to Henry James' The Portrait of a Lady. That novel famously ends inconclusively: having travelled to England against her husband Gilbert Osmond's wishes to witness the death of her beloved cousin Ralph, we don't know if she'll return to her husband in Rome or shape some other future for herself. Banville talks about continuing her story and his debt to James.

When Tate Modern opened its new extension last year, for the first time the gallery had purpose built spaces for performance art, and as Fierce, the live art festival in Birmingham prepares to open, Front Row invited Aaron Wright, the festival's artistic director and Dr Claire MacDonald, co-founder of the arts journal Performance Research to discuss the current state of the performance art landscape.

Michael Fassbender, whose previous films include Hunger, 12 Years a Slave and Steve Jobs, discusses his role as Harry Hole in the film adaptation of Jo Nesbo's thriller The Snowman, in which he plays a detective on the hunt for a serial killer in Norway whose killing spree starts with the first snowfall.

Presenter: Stig Abell

Producer: Rebecca Armstrong.

Credits

Interviewed Guest
Kate Mossman
Interviewed Guest
John Banville
Interviewed Guest
Aaron Wright
Interviewed Guest
Claire MacDonald
Interviewed Guest
Michael Fassbender
Presenter
Stig Abell
Producer
Rebecca Armstrong

Brand

Front Row
Results 1 to 20 of 57

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