Showing results for your search filters

Results 1 to 5 of 5
  • Page 1

Saturday Review

Mudbound, Network, Javier Cercas, She's Got To Have It, North exhibition

Mudbound, Network, Javier Cercas, She's Got To Have It (adapted for TV), North exhibition.

The week's cultural highlights. Mudbound, set in America's deep south; Network at The National; Javier Cercas's The Impostor; She's Got To Have It; and the North exhibition.

Mudbound, is a searing look at prejudice set in the Jim Crow deep south of the United States shortly after WW2

Network is a new production at The National Theatre in London. It's an adaptation of the 1976 Oscar-winning film about a TV anchorman who announces that he's "mad as hell and not going to take it anymore" which appalls then delights and ultimately infuriates his network bosses. It stars Bryan "Breaking Bad" Cranston as the newsreader who wigs out.

Javier Cercas's novel The Impostor tells the extraordinary tale of a Spanish man who falsely claimed to have been a survivor of Mauthausen concentration camp. Can we trust that anything in the story he tells of his life is true?

She's Got To Have It was Spike Lee's 1986 breakout film which he has now adapted into a 10 part TV series for Netflix

North: fashioning Identity, is an exhibition at Somerset House exploring contemporary artistic and stylistic representations of the north of England.

Tom Sutcliffe's guests are Emma Jane Unsworth, Kit Davis and Jim White. The producer is Oliver Jones.

Credits

Presenter
Tom Sutcliffe
Interviewed Guest
Emma Jane Unsworth
Interviewed Guest
Kit Davis
Interviewed Guest
Jim White
Producer
Oliver Jones

Their Finest, The Philanthropist, Lisa McInerny, Ashley Bickerton, The Hours on Radio 4.

Gemma Arterton and Bill Nighy in Their Finest. Christopher Hampton's The Philanthropist, Lisa McInerny's new novel The Blood Miracles, Ashley Bickerton, The Hours on Radio 4.

Gemma Arterton and Bill Nighy star in in Their Finest; a new film about the vital role of movies in Britain during The War.

A revival of Christopher Hampton's 1970 play The Philanthropist has opened in London. It features a glittering array of actors best known for their TV work. How well do their skills transfer to the stage?

Lisa McInerny won The Bailey's Prize 's for her first novel The Glorious Heresies. Her latest, The Blood Miracles, continues that story with same characters many years older and a little wiser

Ashley Bickerton is a painter and sculptor whose work is much admired (and collected) by Damien Hirst, among others. A new exhibition at Hirst's Newport Gallery includes work from throughout Bickertion's career

The Hours is a new radio dramatization of Michael Cunningham's Pulitzer winning book inspired by Virginia Woolf's Mrs Dalloway. Starring Rosamund Pike it has the tricky job of maintaining three simultaneous plotlines set in different eras

Viv Groskop's guests are Emma Jane Unsworth, Ryan Gilbey and Ekow Eshun. The producer is Oliver Jones.

Credits

Presenter
Viv Groskop
Interviewed Guest
Emma Jane Unsworth
Interviewed Guest
Ryan Gilbey
Interviewed Guest
Ekow Eshun
Producer
Oliver Jones

Saturday Review

Leave No Trace, Rip It Up, One For Sorrow, Tim Winton, Bedtime Stories For The End Of The World

Leave No Trace, Rip It Up - Scottish pop, One For Sorrow, Tim Winton, Bedtime Stories.

Leave No Trace, Rip It Up - Scottish pop at the National Museum of Scotland, One For Sorrow at the Royal Court Theatre, Tim Winton: The Shepherd's Hut, and Bedtime Stories.

Leave No Trace is a film about love and survival. A father and daughter living in idyllic remote Oregon woodlands come up against authorities who decide their life can't continue as it has done . Directed by Debra Granik (Winter's Bone)

The story of the evolution of Scotland's pop music scene is told in a new exhibition; Rip It Up at The National Museum of Scotland in Edinburgh.

One For Sorrow is a new play at London's Royal Court Theatre by Cordelia Lynn, about a family who invite a stranger into their home following a terrorist attack

Australian novelist Tim Winton's new novel The Shepherd's Hut is about a dysfunctional 15 year old boy on the run when he believes he'll be convicted for his father's death

A new podcast - Bedtime Stories For The End Of The World - invites some of the UK's top poets to re-tell some of their favourite myths, fairytales and legends.

Panellists are Patrice Lawrence, Emma Jane Unsworth and Peter Ross. Presented by Anne Mcelvoy of The Economist. The producer is Oliver Jones.

Credits

Presenter
Anne McElvoy
Interviewed Guest
Patrice Lawrence
Interviewed Guest
Emma Jane Unsworth
Interviewed Guest
Peter Ross
Producer
Oliver Jones

Woman's Hour

Loneliness; Barbara Kruger; Honey & Co; Bad girls in fiction

Jenni Murray talks to conceptual artist Barbara Kruger about power in popular culture.

Jenni Murray presents the female perspective, including conceptual artist Barbara Kruger, Honey & Co, bad girls in fiction, loneliness in parenthood, and women in archery.

Our series on loneliness continues as we find out why parenthood can be an isolating experience and how it changes as your children grow up. Conceptual artist Barbara Kruger talks how she combines bold slogans, text and image to investigate the dynamics of power in popular culture. Cook The Perfect falafel and tabule salad with Honey & Co; Authors Zoe Pilger and Emma Jane Unsworth are writing about literary bad girls. What is the attraction of female anti-heroines? The numbers of women taking up archery has increased. Anna Bailey went to meet the members of the Aquarius Archery Club in London as they met for their weekly coaching session.

Credits

Presenter
Jenni Murray
Interviewed Guest
Barbara Kruger
Interviewed Guest
Zoe Pilger
Interviewed Guest
Emma Jane Unsworth
Interviewed Guest
Itamar Srulovich
Interviewed Guest
Sarit Packer
Interviewed Guest
Carolyn Lazarus
Producer
Karen Dalziel

Genre

Brand

Woman's Hour

Saturday Review

London Road, Louis de Bernieres, The Tribe, The Red Lion Carsten Holler

Tom Sutcliffe is joined by Abigail Morris, Emma Jane Unsworth and Kerry Shale.

Tom Sutcliffe and guests review film London Road, Louis de Bernieres's latest novel, Channel 4's The Tribe, Patrick Marber's The Red Lion and Carsten Holler at the Hayward Gallery.

London Road is a film of the groundbreaking musical play. Directed by Rufus Norris, it tells the story of a community in Ipswich recovering from a series of gruesome murders.

Louis de Bernieres' latest novel The Dust That Falls From Clouds looks at the lives of those 'left behind' by the First World War

Channel 4's The Tribe is applying the techniques usually used in programmes such as 24 Hours in A+E to a tribe in rural Ethiopia - lots of cameras, lots of microphones and unique access to a largely hitherto unknown community.

Patrick Marber's play The Red Lion deals with non-league football, corruption and compromised integrity.

A retrospective exhibition of the work of Belgian artist Carsten Holler has opened at The Hayward Gallery in London. His work is characterised by playful interactivity - will it impress or delight our reviewers?

Tom Sutcliffe's guests are Abigail Morris, Emma Jane Unsworth and Kerry Shale. The producer is Oliver Jones.

Credits

Presenter
Tom Sutcliffe
Interviewed Guest
Abigail Morris
Interviewed Guest
Emma Jane Unsworth
Interviewed Guest
Kerry Shale
Producer
Oliver Jones
Results 1 to 5 of 5
  • Page 1

Search Help

Do a simple text search or combine your query with a variety of Search Filter options to narrow your results.
Alternatively, search using only Search Filter options with an empty search box.

A completely empty search will find all currently available programmes.

Once you have searched, you can add or exclude further terms from the results page and search again.

Find our more about the Programme Explorer.