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Front Row

Rob Brydon on Swimming With Men, Laura Wade, Ferens Art Gallery

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Rob Brydon on the set of film Swimming With Men, playwright Laura Wade, Claude Lanzmann.

On the set of Swimming With Men with Rob Brydon and Daniel Mays, Laura Wade, writer of Home, I'm Darling, final report on Art Fund Museum of the Year from Ferens Art Gallery, Hull.

Rob Brydon, Daniel Mays and Adeel Akhtar were among the actors spending long hours in swimming pools last summer rehearsing for, and shooting, the new British film Swimming With Men, based on a true story about a group of male synchronised swimmers competing in the world championships. Stig Abell reports from the set at Basildon swimming pool, which was masquerading as Milan, the venue for the finals.

Laura Wade, the playwright behind Posh and the stage adaption of Tipping the Velvet, discusses Home, I'm Darling, her new a play about a modern couple trying emulate the happy domesticity of the 1950s.

With the announcement of the winner of the £100,000 Art Fund Museum of the Year 2018 later this evening, we have our final report from the five finalists. So far we've heard from Brooklands Museum in Weybridge, Glasgow Women's Library, The Postal Museum in London, and Tate St Ives. Tonight we visit Ferens Art Gallery in Hull, which was at the heart of Hull UK City of Culture last year.

Filmmaker and writer Claude Lanzmann, famous for Shoah - his 1985 epic exploration of the Holocaust, has died. He's remembered by the writer and cultural critic Agnes Poirier.

Presenter Stig Abell

Producer Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Presenter
Stig Abell
Interviewed Guest
Rob Brydon
Interviewed Guest
Daniel Mays
Interviewed Guest
Adeel Akhtar
Interviewed Guest
Laura Wade
Interviewed Guest
Agnes Poirier
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

Brand

Front Row

Woman's Hour

Marine le Pen and the French presidential race, Georgette Heyer, No fault divorce

BBC Radio 4
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41 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Will Marine le Pen become the first female president of France? With Jenni Murray.

Will Marine le Pen become the first female President of France? Journalist Agnes Poirier looks at the career of the leader of the Front National.

Newly discovered stories by the best selling author Georgette Heyer have been published in a collection called 'Snowdrift and Other Stories'. Jennifer Kloester, Heyer's biographer on how she found the stories and why she's publishing them thirty two years after the author died.

Suzi Godson, The Sex and Relationship columnist for The Times has been hearing from women in their fifties about the changes and challenges of this particular decade on long term relationships. Today we hear about supporting a partner through severe depression.

Should no fault divorces be made easier? Jo Edwards of Resolution, a national organisation of family lawyers.

Credits

Presenter
Jenni Murray
Interviewed Guest
Agnes Poirier
Interviewed Guest
Jennifer Kloester
Interviewed Guest
Suzi Godson
Producer
Eleanor Garland

Genre

Brand

Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

Dina Asher-Smith, No fault divorce, Moana

BBC Radio 4
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58 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Highlights from the Woman's Hour week. Dina Asher-Smith, no-fault divorce, Disney's Moana.

The fastest woman in Britain Dina Asher-Smith, the family lawyers calling for a no-fault divorce and the 'anti-princess' Moana.

Dina Asher-Smith, currently the fastest female sprinter in British history, talks about competing in Rio and the challenges of combining a sports career with university life.

This week we've been hearing from women in their 50s about what this decade brings to marriages and partnerships. 54 year old Erika talks about her same sex marriage with Susan after spending 20 years in a happy heterosexual relationship.

Valley Fontaine and Trichologist Shirley McDonald discuss letting afro hair grow naturally and the damage that chemicals, braids and weaves can cause.

Journalist and broadcaster Agnes Poirier on the likelihood that Marine Le Pen, the leader of France's far right Front National, will become the first French female president.

150 family lawyers are calling for a no fault divorce. Jo Edwards from Resolution, an organisation of family lawyers lobbying for the law change, tells us why no fault divorces should be made easier.

Baroness Ann Taylor, the first female chief Whip, discusses the play The House set in 1974 in the engine rooms of the House of Commons - when she became a whip. She tells us what it's like to see herself portrayed on stage.

Plus the new Disney film Moana stars a female lead that doesn't have a love interest, a crown or a castle and as such has been termed the 'anti princess' by critics. The editorial director of the Sunday Times Eleanor Mills and Helen O' Hara editor at large of Empire Magazine discuss how far Disney has come with its female leads.

Presented by Jane Garvey

Produced by Rabeka Nurmahomed

Edited by Jane Thurlow.

Credits

Presenter
Jane Garvey
Producer
Rabeka Nurmahomed
Editor
Jane Thurlow
Interviewed Guest
Dina Asher-Smith
Interviewed Guest
Valley Fontaine
Interviewed Guest
Shirley McDonald
Interviewed Guest
Agnes Poirier
Interviewed Guest
Jo Edwards
Interviewed Guest
Ann Taylor
Interviewed Guest
Eleanor Mills
Interviewed Guest
Helen O'Hara

Genre

Brand

Woman's Hour

Front Row

Tom Hanks, Sir Simon Rattle, French heritage funding

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Tom Hanks on his new film, The Post, co-starring Meryl Streep.

Tom Hanks discusses his new film, The Post, directed by Steven Spielberg, French heritage lottery funding and Simon Rattle on conducting the rarely performed The Genesis Suite.

Tom Hanks discusses his new film The Post, co-starring Meryl Streep and directed by Steven Spielberg, which tells the story of the part The Washington Post played in publishing the top secret Pentagon Papers that changed American public opinion about the Vietnam War.

Sir Simon Rattle is conducting the European concert premiere of The Genesis Suite, a work with narration based on stories from the first book of the Bible, such as Adam and Eve, the Flood and the Tower of Babel. The conductor discusses the little-known piece from 1945 which was written by seven different European composers, émigrés to America, including Schoenberg, Stravinsky and Milhaud, who each composed a movement.

The French culture minister Françoise Nyssen has unveiled plans to launch a heritage lottery. The money will go towards restoring ancient monuments. It follows reports of a fall in lottery receipts in the UK. French journalist Agnes Poirier and cultural historian Robert Hewison discuss the proposal, and consider how far arts and heritage funding should be lottery-dependent.

Presenter Kirsty Lang

Producer Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Presenter
Kirsty Lang
Interviewed Guest
Tom Hanks
Interviewed Guest
Sir Simon Rattle
Interviewed Guest
Agnes Poirier
Interviewed Guest
Robert Hewison
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

Brand

Front Row

Start the Week

1968: Radicals and Riots

BBC Radio 4
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43 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Andrew Marr with Sophie Pedder, Agnes Poirier, Richard Vinen and Roger Scruton.

Andrew Marr looks back at Paris 1968 with journalist Sophie Pedder, historians Agnes Poirier and Richard Vinen and philosopher Roger Scruton.

Fifty years after radicals took to the streets of Paris and stormed campuses across the Western World, Andrew Marr unpicks the legacy of 1968.

Historian Richard Vinen finds waves of protest across the western world in his book The Long '68: Radical Protest and Its Enemies. Some movements were genuinely revolutionary, such as the ten million French workers whose strike nearly toppled the government. But on American university campuses and in British art schools, protests took the forms of civil rights marches and feminist collectives, whose narratives changed the way we think today.

In Paris, left-wing students armed with works of philosophy took on the police and the state. But Paris was still coming to terms with its Nazi occupation, explains Agnès Poirier. Her new book follows the artists and writers of the 40s and 50s, from Simone de Beauvoir and Jean-Paul Sartre to Miles Davis and James Baldwin, as a new generation helped France regain its reputation for art, passion and political action.

Not only left-wing radicals were inspired by the events of that year. In 1968 philosopher Roger Scruton was holed up in a Paris bedroom studying while rioters smashed windows outside. Scruton was horrified by the chaos and destruction, and turned his back on the left-wing politics of his childhood. He became part of a generation of new conservatives who sought to preserve the past rather than fight for an unknown future.

Today France is facing new waves of strikes, with railway workers bringing the transport system to a halt and Emmanuel Macron pushing through sweeping reforms to social security. Sophie Pedder, Paris bureau chief for The Economist and author or a new biography of Macron, asks what France in 2018 owes to the events of 1968.

Producer: Hannah Sander.

Credits

Presenter
Andrew Marr
Interviewed Guest
Sophie Pedder
Interviewed Guest
Agnes Poirier
Interviewed Guest
Richard Vinen
Interviewed Guest
Roger Scruton
Producer
Hannah Sander

Front Row

Palme d'Or winner Dheepan, Diana Damrau, Noma Dumezweni, Garth Greenwell

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

A review of the Palme d'Or-winning film Dheepan plus German soprano Diana Damrau.

Palme d'Or-winning film Dheepan, German soprano Diana Damrau on Lucia di Lammermoor, Noma Dumezweni in our Shakespeare's People series, and American novelist Garth Greenwell.

Dheepan, the winner of the Palme d'Or at the 2015 Cannes Film Festival, tells the story of a former Sri Lankan Tamil fighter who flees the civil war to France with a woman and young girl he has never met. After finding work and housing in the suburbs of Pairs this fake family soon find that the violence they have run from is replaced by a new danger. Agnes Poirier reviews the film.

German soprano Diana Damrau discusses her role as Lucia di Lammermoor in a controversial and bloody new production at the Royal Opera House in London.

Noma Dumezweni, who is about to star as Hermione in Harry Potter and the Cursed Child on stage, chooses Paulina from The Winter's Tale as part of our Shakespeare's People series.

US writer Garth Greenwell's debut novel What Belongs to You is the story of a American teacher who becomes obsessed with a sex worker in Bulgaria. Garth talks to Samira about the mixture of fact and fiction in the novel, and his growing up gay in Kentucky and his advocacy of 'queer culture'.

Presenter Samira Ahmed

Producer Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Presenter
Samira Ahmed
Producer
Jerome Weatherald
Interviewed Guest
Agnes Poirier
Interviewed Guest
Diana Damrau
Interviewed Guest
Noma Dumezweni
Interviewed Guest
Garth Greenwell

Brand

Front Row

Front Row

David Walliams, Jeanne Moreau and Sam Shepard remembered, Zinzi Clemmons, Jukebox musicals

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

David Walliams on Gangsta Granny, and Jeanne Moreau and Sam Shepard remembered.

David Walliams on his play Gangsta Granny; Jeanne Moreau and Sam Shepard remembered; Zinzi Clemmons's novel What We Lose; jukebox musicals.

David Walliams has just notched up his 100th week as the UK's best-selling children's author. Among his most popular books is Gangsta Granny, and a stage version is about to open at the London's Garrick Theatre. David Walliams tells Samira Ahmed why he thinks the play is better than the book, and how his career as a children's author developed out of the comedy sketch show he created with Matt Lucas - Little Britain.

Cultural commentator Agnès Poirier reflects on the life of Jeanne Moreau, the French film actress and leading light of the Nouvelle Vague, whose death was announced today; and New York Times London theatre critic Matt Wolf remembers the American Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright and actor Sam Shepard, who has died aged 73.

Debut novelist Zinzi Clemmons was brought up in the USA, with roots in South Africa and Trinidad. She discusses her fragmentary book What We Lose, which was inspired by her own experiences nursing her mother through terminal cancer and explores motherhood, race and grief.

Ever since Mamma Mia! burst onto the West End stage in 2001, the jukebox musical - using a popular artist's back catalogue of music to tell a theatrical story - has become a phenomenon. But why do some make millions and some spectacularly flop? Are they a great way of bringing theatre to the masses, or simply a lazy ploy by producers to guarantee a cash cow?

Presenter Samira Ahmed

Producer Harry Parker.

Credits

Interviewed Guest
David Walliams
Interviewed Guest
Agnes Poirier
Interviewed Guest
Zinzi Clemmons
Interviewed Guest
Matt Wolf
Presenter
Samira Ahmed
Producer
Harry Parker

Brand

Front Row

Open Book

Bill Clegg on Did You Ever Have a Family

BBC Radio 4
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28 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Mariella Frostrup talks to Bill Clegg about his book Did You Ever Have a Family.

The best new fiction and non-fiction, talking to writers and unearthing lost classics. Mariella Frostrup talks to Bill Clegg about his book Did You Ever Have a Family.

Literary agent Bill Clegg is famous in the publishing world for his tough negotiations. Now he's turned novelist himself and he talks to Mariella Frostrup about his Man Booker longlisted Did You Ever Have A Family which imagines the impact of a devastating house fire on those left behind. It's written from a variety of perspectives and he talks about picking up on fictional gossip and the way his own struggle with addiction influenced this novel.

Also on the programme, writer Matt Haig on judging the new BBC Young Writers Award, Agnes Poirier offers a guide to French Nobel Laureate Patrick Modiano whose works are newly available in English and Israeli novelist Etgar Keret selects the Book He'd Never Lend.

Credits

Presenter
Mariella Frostrup
Interviewed Guest
Bill Clegg
Interviewed Guest
Matt Haig
Interviewed Guest
Agnes Poirier
Interviewed Guest
Etgar Keret

Brand

Open Book

Last Word

Paul Ausseresses, Olivia Robertson, Noel Woodall, Hugh de Wardener, Junior Murvin

BBC Radio 4
BBC Radio 4 logo
28 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Matthew Bannister on a general, an archpriestess, an autonumerologist and a nephrologist.

Matthew Bannister on General Paul Aussaressess, Archpriestess Olivia Robertson, car number plate expert Noel Woodall, kidney specialist Hugh de Wardener and singer Junior Murvin.

Matthew Bannister on

The French General Paul Aussaresses who admitted to taking part in summary executions and torture during the Algerian War of Independence.

Olivia Robertson, the flamboyant Archpriestess of the Fellowship of Isis, who worked to bring feminine influence into religion in her castle in Ireland.

Noel Woodall, the car number plate expert whose passion became a billion pound industry.

Professor Hugh de Wardener, the pioneering kidney specialist who treated inmates in a Japanese prisoner of war camp.

And reggae singer Junior Murvin, best known for his song Police and Thieves.

Producer: Laura Northedge.

Credits

Presenter
Matthew Bannister
Interviewed Guest
Agnes Poirier
Interviewed Guest
Anna Currey
Interviewed Guest
Cressida Pryor
Interviewed Guest
Quentin Willson
Interviewed Guest
Gabrielle de Wardener
Interviewed Guest
Robert Schrier
Interviewed Guest
David Katz
Producer
Laura Northedge

Brand

Last Word

Last Word

Paco de Lucia, Frank Rushbrook, Rose Finn-Kelcey, Logan Scott-Bowden, Alain Resnais

BBC Radio 4
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28 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Aasmah Mir remembers a guitarist, a firefighter, an artist, a soldier and a director.

Aasmah Mir on flamenco guitarist Paco de Lucia, fire safety expert Dr Frank Rushbrook, artist Rose Finn-Kelcey, Major General Logan Scott-Bowden and film director Alain Resnais.

Aasmah Mir on

The guitarist Paco de Lucia who became the leading proponent of the 'New Flamenco' style.

Fire safety expert Dr Frank Rushbrook who pioneered fire training for sailors and helped to establish degree courses in fire safety.

Rose Finn-Kelcey, inventive artist whose works and installations combined social commentary with playful humour.

Logan Scott-Bowden, part of a secret team whose risky night-time mission it was to check whether the beaches of Normandy were suitable for the D-Day landings.

And the French director Alain Resnais who used innovative editing techniques to create depth and mystery in his films.

Credits

Presenter
Aasmah Mir
Producer
Simon Tillotson
Interviewed Guest
James Lygate
Interviewed Guest
Hermione Wiltshire
Interviewed Guest
Sarah Kent
Interviewed Guest
Jim Booth
Interviewed Guest
Agnes Poirier
Interviewed Guest
Therese Saba

Brand

Last Word

Last Word

Jean Cabut and Georges Wolinski, Luise Rainer, Edward Brooke and Chip Young

BBC Radio 4
BBC Radio 4 logo
28 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Matthew Bannister on two cartoonists, an actress, a senator and a session guitarist.

Obituary series. Matthew Bannister on cartoonists Jean Cabut and Georges Wolinski, actress Luise Rainer, US senator Edward Brooke and session guitarist and producer Chip Young.

Matthew Bannister on

The French cartoonists Jean Cabut and Georges Wolinski who were among the twelve people who died when gunmen stormed the offices of the satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo.

The German born actress Luise Rainer who won two Oscars, but ended her Hollywood career when she fell out with the movie mogul Louis B Mayer.

Edward Brooke who was the first African American to be elected to the US senate.

And Chip Young, the session guitarist and producer who played on hits for Elvis Presley, Dolly Parton and many more.

Credits

Presenter
Matthew Bannister
Interviewed Guest
Agnes Poirier
Interviewed Guest
Francesca Knittel-Bowyer
Interviewed Guest
Adrian Walker
Interviewed Guest
Richard Johnson
Interviewed Guest
Garth Cartwright
Interviewed Guest
Billy Swan

Brand

Last Word

Woman's Hour

DSK, what do French women think? Why do parents keep quiet about their children's mental ill-health?Jean Harrod

BBC Radio 4
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45 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

The Dominique Strauss-Kahn trial: what do French women think? Jenni Murray presents.

Dominique Strauss-Kahn trial: what do French women think? Why are parents reluctant to access counselling for children? And diplomat-turned-novelist Jean Harrod. With Jenni Murray.

The ongoing trial of the former head of the International Monetary Fund Dominique Strauss-Kahn for pimping prostitutes has been headline news inside and outside France. Since 5 out of 6 plaintiffs dropped their cases against him earlier this week, it looks increasingly likely that he will be acquitted, as the prosecutor has advised the judge to do. Guilty or innocent - do French women care about the outcome? Jenni is joined by French journalist Agnes Poirier to discuss. A study carried out by a children's charity has found that almost a third of parents of children aged 5 - 18 years old admit they would feel embarrassed if their child wanted counselling in school. Jenni is joined by Dr. Fiona Pienaar Clinical Director at Place2be and from Allie who suffered mental health problems as a child.

Former diplomat Jean Harrod spent her working life travelling the world. She has now published her first novel, "Deadly Diplomacy," which tells the story of a British consul caught up in a murder investigation in Australia. So, how much did her real life experience influence her fiction? And how did Jean's local coffee shop in Yorkshire help her get into print? Modern day slavery in the UK, Jenni hears from a domestic worker who escaped from an abusive employer and from Marissa Begonia who helps rescue women from forms of modern day slavery. A feminist, satirical drama The Last of the De Mullins set in 1908 which dealt with working, single mothers who refused to be tied to the institution of marriage, is being revived in London. How did such a controversial play slip through the censors then and why it is still relevant today?

Presenter: Jenni Murray

Producer: Caroline Donne.

Credits

Presenter
Jenni Murray
Interviewed Guest
Agnes Poirier
Interviewed Guest
Fiona Pienaar
Interviewed Guest
Jean Harrod
Interviewed Guest
Marissa Begonia
Producer
Caroline Donne

Genre

Brand

Woman's Hour

Open Book

The Brethren; The Sense of Style

BBC Radio 4
BBC Radio 4 logo
28 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Mariella Frostrup discusses Robert Merle's The Brethren, and Steven Pinker on Style.

Marilla Frostrup discusses Robert Merle's iconic French series The Brethren, now in English. Plus a look behind the genius of Ian Curtis, and socio-linguist Steven Pinker on style.

Mariella Frostrup discusses Robert Merle's The Brethren, the first book in an epic French historical drama which is just been translated into English, with it's translator T. Jefferson Kline and critic Agnes Poirier.

Experimental psychologist Steven Pinker on his new book The Sense of Style - the Thinking Person's Guide to Writing in the 21st Century, about the written word and how best to utilise it.

And a new book celebrating the lyrics of Ian Curtis of Joy Division.

Producer: Kirsten Locke.

Credits

Presenter
Mariella Frostrup
Interviewed Guest
Steven Pinker
Interviewed Guest
T Jefferson Kline
Interviewed Guest
Agnes Poirier
Producer
Kirsten Locke

Brand

Open Book

Woman's Hour

Singer-songwriter Anna Calvi, Author Eva Meijer, French feminism, Why do we want to get rid of our cellulite?

BBC Radio 4
BBC Radio 4 logo
58 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Music from Anna Calvi, author Eva Meijer, French feminism, and getting rid of cellulite.

Anna Calvi performs a song from her new album Hunter, and Eva Meijer discusses the life of naturalist Len Howard. Plus, in the #Metoo era, where is French feminism in the debate?

Twice Mercury nominated Anna Calvi talks about her new third album 'Hunter' which explores the idea of women as the hunters rather than the hunted and performs one of the tracks 'Don't beat the girl out of My Boy'.

Protestors in Paris this week began vandalising the new open air urinals claiming that they are sexist and unfair and send the message that men can expose themselves in public reinforcing the idea that women aren't welcome in the public space. In the #Metoo era where is French feminism in the debate on gender equality and sexual harassment?

Ninety percent of us have it and most of us have tried to get rid of it: cellulite. What is it and why is it considered so unsightly? Jenni is joined by dermatologist Dr Justine Kluk and writer Alexandra Jones, who has been trying to reduce the appearance of the 'orange peel' effect since her early teens.

Len Howard was a British naturalist who left her life as a professional and respected musician to devote her time to birds. She's also the subject of animal philosopher Eva Meijer's new novel, Bird Cottage and she joins Jenni to talk about Len's life and legacy.

Presenter Jenni Murray

Producer Beverley Purcell.

Credits

Presenter
Jenni Murray
Interviewed Guest
Anna Calvi
Interviewed Guest
Alexandra Jones
Interviewed Guest
Justine Kluk
Interviewed Guest
Eva Meijer
Interviewed Guest
Agnes Poirier
Performer
Anna Calvi
Producer
Beverley Purcell

Genre

Brand

Woman's Hour

Front Row

Mervyn Morris, French cultural landscape, Monochrome films

BBC Radio 4
BBC Radio 4 logo
30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Jamaican poet Mervyn Morris, and the future cultural landscape of France.

Jamaica's first Poet Laureate Mervyn Morris; how the French cultural landscape could look following the presidential election; the lasting appeal of monochrome films.

Mervyn Morris is Jamaica's first Poet Laureate since the country gained independence in 1962. As his tenure draws to a close, the poet reflects on his time in the role, and discusses his new collection, Peelin Orange, which is drawn from his writing over 50 years.

With the deciding round of the French presidential election this Sunday, cultural commentators Agnès Poirier and Andrew Hussey discuss the likely impact of a Macron or Le Pen win on the arts in France and whether culture is a political card to be played.

With the release of a 'Black and Chrome' edition of the 2015 Oscar-winning movie Mad Max: Fury Road, BFI's Gaylene Gould considers film-makers' love affair with black & white.

The Ferryman by William Stott of Oldham is on display for the first time today at Tate Britain having been acquired for the public. John Wilson looks at the painting with the curator Alison Smith who explains that it marks a pivotal moment in this country's art, the embrace of naturalism and progress towards impressionism - British impressionism.

Presenter John Wilson

Producer Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Interviewed Guest
Mervyn Morris
Interviewed Guest
Agnes Poirier
Interviewed Guest
Andrew Hussey
Interviewed Guest
Gaylene Gould
Interviewed Guest
Alison Smith
Presenter
John Wilson
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

Brand

Front Row

Woman's Hour

Are Women as likely as Men to Vote in the General Election? Walking Netball

BBC Radio 4
BBC Radio 4 logo
58 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Do women vote less than men? And who is playing walking netball?

Do women vote less than men? What is walking netball? Emmanuel Macron says he wants to formalise the role of first lady - the programme discusses the implications.

The new French President Emmanuel Macron says he wants to formalise the role of First Lady and give his wife Brigitte a public role. We discuss.

A photo of 14 black male Cambridge students went viral this week, highlighting that just 15 black male undergraduates were admitted to the university in 2015. How similar is the situation for black British female students at Oxford and Cambridge? We speak to Cambridge University students and vloggers Courtney Daniella Boateng and Imani Shola, and to Naomi Kellman who runs Target Oxbridge and was a student at Oxford University.

There has been a push this year at grassroots level to get more women playing netball, including the gentler version, walking netball. Henrietta Harrison went to see a team in Nottingham.

And are women are likely as men to vote in the General Election? It's been claimed in the past that there were millions of missing women voters and a gender voting gap that was growing bigger - was that true, and what happened in 2015?

Credits

Presenter
Jane Garvey
Interviewed Guest
Agnes Poirier
Interviewed Guest
Maggie Allison
Interviewed Guest
Naomi Kellman
Interviewed Guest
Imani Shola
Interviewed Guest
Courtney Daniella Boateng
Interviewed Guest
Fiona Lewis
Interviewed Guest
Rosie Campbell
Producer
Lucinda Montefiore

Genre

Brand

Woman's Hour
Results 1 to 16 of 16
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