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Saturday Review

Blue Is the Warmest Colour; Dylan Thomas; No Place to Go

Tom Sutcliffe and guests discuss Palme d'Or winner Blue Is the Warmest Colour.

In Cardiff, Sir Peter Blake interprets Under Milk Wood, in celebration of the 100th anniversary of poet Dylan Thomas's birth. Plus, Palme d'Or winner Blue Is the Warmest Colour.

Palme d'Or winning film Blue is the Warmest Colour has proved controversial, in part because of its subject matter - it's a story of two young lesbians who fall in love. The author of the original bande dessinee has described the film as porn, and the lengthy explicit sex scenes have caused consternation. And since its release the two actresses have said that they feel exploited. So it's a prize-winning film mired in problems but is it worth paying money to go and see?

Have you ever wondered what Arthur Conan Doyle would make of contemporary crime fiction ? Or how the Marquis de Sade feels about the fact that his plays are largely forgotten and that his name is mostly associated with sexual peccadilloes? A new book from Granta allows present day authors to imagine interviews with artists who - long ago - shuffled off this mortal coil. Is this merely a vanity project for the authors to stretch their skills or can it offer some sort of insight into the mind and working of their dead heroes?

2014 will mark the centenary of Dylan Thomas's birth. The great Welsh poet's most famous work - Under Milk Wood - has long been an inspiration to artist Sir Peter Blake. A new exhibition just opened in the Cardiff shows his interpretation of the story and its characters - he still listens to the radio play at least once a week. How successfully can an Englishman translate one of the classics of Welsh literature?

How can you turn redundancy into art? Earl Lipton is a New Yorker who has created a cabaret show about being made unemployed when his company relocated operations "to Mars". With songs including "Thank You (Financial Crisis Blues)"and "(When I move in with) My aging middle-class parents" it takes a satirical look at the problems that having no job can entail. It also includes a song sung by an abandoned sandwich. No Place To Go is at the Gate Theatre in London.

Jim Al-Khalili OBE is a theoretical physicist and Professor of Theoretical Physics and Chair in the Public Engagement in Science at the University of Surrey. He has a new series on BBC4/Open University that explores what 95% of what the universe is made up of. Can even he explain to a layman what dark matter is?

Tom Sutcliffe is joined by professor Maria Delgado, journalist Jim White and poet Cahal Dallat.

Producer: Oliver Jones.

Credits

Presenter
Tom Sutcliffe
Interviewed Guest
Maria Delgado
Interviewed Guest
Jim White
Interviewed Guest
Cahal Dallat
Producer
Oliver Jones

Saturday Review

Still Alice, Game, Nurse, David Vann, Forensics

Oscar-winning Still Alice, Mike Bartlett's Game, Nurse, David Vann, Forensics exhibition.

Julianne Moore's Oscar-winning performance in Still Alice, Mike Bartlett's Game at The Almeida, Paul Whitehouse in Nurse on BBC2, David Vann's novel Aquarium, Forensics exhibition.

Julianne Moore won an Oscar for her performance as Alice, who has Early Onset Alzheimer's disease in Still Alice. Does a great performance make a great movie?

Mike Bartlett's new play Game at London's Almeida theatre raises questions about how desperate people become when they're looking for somewhere to live.

Paul Whitehouse plays multiple characters in his TV series Nurse which is transferring from Radio 4 to BBC2. It deal with the travails of a Community Psychiatric Nurse and her patients.

David Vann's novel Aquarium is told from the point of view of a 12 year old girl whose happy life with her single mother is thrown into disarray by a chance encounter

Forensics - The Anatomy of Crime, has opened at The Wellcome Collection in London, and it looks at crime from being committed to criminal conviction.

Tom Sutcliffe's guests are Tracy Chevalier, Catherine O'Flynn and Craig Raine. The producer is Oliver Jones.

Credits

Presenter
Tom Sutcliffe
Interviewed Guest
Tracy Chevalier
Interviewed Guest
Catherine O'Flynn
Interviewed Guest
Craig Raine
Producer
Oliver Jones

Saturday Review

Here Lies Love, Palo Alto, Life Story, Being Mortal, Germany at the British Museum.

Razia Iqbal chairs sharp, critical discussion of the week's cultural events.

David Byrne's musical Here Lies Love, Gia Coppola's debut film Palo Alto, David Attenborough's Life Story on BBC One, Atul Gawande's Being Mortal and Germany at the British Museum.

Here Lies Love is David Byrne and Fatboy Slim's disco musical that tells the life story of the former First Lady of the Philippines Imelda Marcos, from poverty to the Presidential Palace. Is she a suitable subject for a musical?

Gia Coppola is the grand-daughter of Hollywood titan Francis Ford Coppola and her debut film Palo Alto has just been released in the UK. Does this film show the kind of promise that she might have what it takes as a director to match her aunt Sophia or even her grandfather?

David Attenborough's ninth 'Life' series begins on BBC1 this week. Life Story follows animals from all over the world on their journey through life. Can Sir David breathe new life into an established and much-loved format?

US surgeon and writer Atul Gawande's latest book Being Mortal is about how to make the process of dying as good as possible. Have we lost sight of the needs of the patient in the last moments of their life; trying to make them live longer rather than better?

To celebrate 25 years since the fall of The Berlin Wall, The British Museum's major new exhibition 'Germany: Memories of a Nation' tries to encapsulate 600 years of German history. Which items should be included to reflect the vitality of one of Europe's most important nations.

Razia Iqbal is joined by Alex Preston, Abigail Morris and Cahal Dallat. The producer is Oliver Jones.

Credits

Presenter
Razia Iqbal
Interviewed Guest
Alex Preston
Interviewed Guest
Abigail Morris
Interviewed Guest
Cahal Dallat
Producer
Oliver Jones

Saturday Review

Electra, Gone Girl, The Code, Howard Jacobson, Gothic Imagination

Tom Sutcliffe chairs sharp, critical discussion of the week's cultural events.

Kristin Scott Thomas in Electra at the Old Vic, David Fincher's film Gone Girl, Howard Jacobson's Booker-nominated J, Gothic Imagination at British Library, and BBC4's The Code.

Kristin Scott Thomas plays the title role in Electra at The Old Vic. It's a millennia old play in a modern translation by Frank McGuinness and directed by Ian Rickson.

David Fincher's film version of Gillian Flynn's best seller Gone Girl stars Ben Affleck and Rosamund Pike. Howard Jacobson's Booker-nominated novel J imagines a dystopian world where a Holocaust-type event might happen again.

Gothic Imagination at The British Library explores 250 years of a public predilection for horror and terror.

BBC4's new Australian drama The Code deals with a corrupt government dealing ruthlessly with cyber skulduggery.

Tom Sutcliffe's guests are Stephanie Merritt, Dea Birkett and Sarfraz Manzoor. The producer is Oliver Jones.

Credits

Presenter
Tom Sutcliffe
Interviewed Guest
Stephanie Merritt
Interviewed Guest
Dea Birkett
Interviewed Guest
Sarfraz Manzoor
Producer
Oliver Jones

Saturday Review

Destiny, Pride, The Leftovers, Ali Smith, Horst

Tom Sutcliffe and guests discuss Destiny, the most expensive video game ever produced.

Tom Sutcliffe and guests discuss the most expensive video game ever, a film about gay groups supporting miners during the '84 strike, life after the Rapture and more.

Destiny: the most expensive video game ever produced has just been released - a perfect excuse for us to explore the rich and diverse world of gaming.

Pride is a lighthearted film about lesbian and gay groups from London who supported miners during the 84 miners' strike - leading to an unexpectedly harmonious and fruitful relationship.

What would America be like after a Rapture-like event when 2% of the population will be taken into heaven and the rest are left behind? The Leftovers is a TV series that considers a post-rapture-like USA.

Ali Smith's new novel is called How To Be Both - 2 complimentary self-contained stories that can be read in either order.

Horst was a German American fashion photographer whose work is featured in a new exhibition at London's Victoria and Albert Museum.

Tom Sutcliffe's guests are Kevin Jackson, Barb Jungr and Catherine O'Flynn. The producer is Oliver Jones.

Credits

Presenter
Tom Sutcliffe
Interviewed Guest
Kevin Jackson
Interviewed Guest
Barb Jungr
Interviewed Guest
Catherine O'Flynn
Producer
Oliver Jones

Saturday Review

Oppenheimer, A Most Violent Year, Fortitude, Rubens, Sandip Roy

RSC's Oppenheimer, Dont Let Him Know, A Most Violent Year and Rubens and His Legacy.

Cultural highlights: RSC's Oppenheimer, A Most Violent Year, TV series Fortitude, Rubens and His Legacy exhibition at the Royal Academy, and Sandip Roy's novel Dont Let Him Know.

The RSC's latest production is Oppenheimer, a play about the man behind the invention of the nuclear bomb - a flawed hero, is it a flawless production?

A Most Violent Year is set in New York in 1981, a year when more than 1.2m crimes were committed. JC Chandor's film follows a man trying to build up a family business in the face of alarming violence and corruption.

Fortitude is Arctic noir TV. Set in an Icelandic Research Station where mysterious and untoward things start happening, the cast includes Sofie Grabol, Michael Gambon, Christopher Ecclestone and a host of other big names. Will it leave the reviewers cold?

Rubens And His Legacy at the Royal Academy attempts to explore the influence of the great Flemish master on artists over the last three and a half centuries.

Sandip Roy's first novel Dont Let Him Know tells the story of a young man in modern India exploring his sexual identity.

Tom Sutcliffe's guests are Lionel Shriver, Sophie Hannah and Francis Spufford. The producer is Oliver Jones.

Credits

Presenter
Tom Sutcliffe
Interviewed Guest
Lionel Shriver
Interviewed Guest
Sophie Hannah
Interviewed Guest
Francis Spufford
Producer
Oliver Jones

Saturday Review

Ai Wei Wei, Margaret Atwood, 99 Homes, Fake It 'til You Make It, Music for Misfits

The week's cultural highlights, including Ai Wei Wei, Margaret Atwood, and 99 Homes.

Looking at Ai Wei Wei at The Royal Academy, Margaret Atwood's The Heart Goes Last, the film 99 Homes, the play Fake It 'Til You Make It, and Music for Misfits - the Story of Indie.

Ai Wei Wei's new exhibition at The Royal Academy shows how his work continues to be a thorn in the side of The Chinese government. But does it make for a satisfying exhibition?

Margaret Atwood's new novel The Heart Goes Last was originally published as a 4 part serial work online.

99 Homes is a film which takes what might sound like an unpromising premise - foreclosure of mortgages - and tries to turn it into a thriller.

You might not expect a play about depression to use song and dance and comedy to tell its tale but Fake it 'til you make it, at London's Soho Theatre attempts to do just that.

BBC4's Music for Misfits tells the tale of how independent record labels and indie bands reshaped the UK music business and were then appropriated by those they intended to replace.

Tom Sutcliffe's guests are Crystal Mahey Morgan, David Hepworth and Deborah Moggach. The producer is Oliver Jones.

Credits

Presenter
Tom Sutcliffe
Interviewed Guest
Crystal Mahey-Morgan
Interviewed Guest
David Hepworth
Interviewed Guest
Deborah Moggach
Producer
Oliver Jones

Saturday Review

The Revenant, Annie Leibovitz, Nicholas Searle, The Rack Pack, Give Me Your Love

Including a look at Oscar contender The Revenant and the Annie Leibovitz exhibition.

The week's cultural highlights, including Oscar contender The Revenant, the Annie Leibovitz exhibition, Nicholas Searle's The Good Liar and Snooker comedy film The Rack Pack.

Leonardo DiCaprio stars as American pioneers-man Hugh Glass, in Oscar-contender The Revenant. It's graphic, visceral, epic in scope and could sweep the boards at the awards

Photographer Annie Leibovitz has an exhibition of portraits under the title "Women", which will tour the globe. How does she tackle such an enormous subject?

The debut novel by former civil servant Nicholas Searle "the Good Liar" is gaining a lot of attention but do our critics think it's a good book?

BBC iPlayer's first online-only drama is a snooker comedy film 'The Rack Pack' - which tells the story of the rise of the sport in the early 80's from a parlour game to a world-conquering TV fixture.

Give Me Your Love is a play at The Battersea Arts Centre about the treatment of former combatants who have PTSD with MDMA (ecstasy). Is this a wise move?

Tom Sutcliffe's guests are Paul Morley, Natalie Haynes and Jacqueline Springer. The producer is Oliver Jones.

Credits

Presenter
Tom Sutcliffe
Interviewed Guest
Paul Morley
Interviewed Guest
Natalie Haynes
Interviewed Guest
Jacqueline Springer
Producer
Oliver Jones

Saturday Review

Alexander McQueen, Suite Francaise, X+Y, Antigone, Tom McCarthy

Alexander McQueen exhibition, Suite Francaise, X+Y, Juliette Binoche and Satin Island.

The Alexander McQueen exhibition at the Victoria and Albert Museum, the films Suite Francaise and X+Y, Juliette Binoche in Antigone and Tom McCarthy's Satin Island.

When an exhibition of the fashion creations of Alexander McQueen opened in New York, visitors queued for up to 5 hours to get in. It's now at London's Victoria and Albert Museum; will it be such a crowd-puller

Suite Francaise - Irene Nemerovski's wartime novel (discovered more than six decades after her death) was a best seller. Can it repeat its success as a film?

X+Y is a film about a young maths prodigy who is on the autistic spectrum. It deals with his participation in the International Mathematical Olympiad and growing up emotionally

Juliette Binoche plays the lead in Antigone at London's Barbican Theatre. Directed by Ivo Von Hove, it's caused a lot of advance excitement.

Tom McCarthy's new novel Satin Island is a meditation on contemporary society that some reviewers have accused of ditching traditionally novelistic techniques like plot and character. Is it all the better for it?

Tom Sutcliffe's guests are Helen Lewis, Dominic Sandbrook and Kit Davis. The producer is Oliver Jones.

Credits

Presenter
Tom Sutcliffe
Interviewed Guest
Helen Lewis
Interviewed Guest
Dominic Sandbrook
Interviewed Guest
Kit Davis
Producer
Oliver Jones

Saturday Review

Deep Blue Sea, Fire At Sea, Edmund White, Winifred Knights, Outcast/Preacher

Culture show. Deep Blue Sea, Fire At Sea, Edmund White, Winifred Knights, Outcast/Preacher

Rattigan's Deep Blue Sea, prize-winning documentary Fire At Sea, Edmund White's novel Our Young Man, Winifred Knights at Dulwich Picture Gallery, Outcast and Preacher on TV.

Terrence Rattigan's post-war classic Deep Blue Sea opens in a new production at London's NationalTheatre; dealing with need, loneliness and long-repressed passion. Directed by Carrie Cracknell with Helen McRory as Hester

Fire At Sea is the Italian documentary which won The Golden Bear at this year's Berlin Film festival. Set on the Sicilian Island of Lampedusa, it examines the lives of the locals and the migrants who land there.

Edmund White's novel Our Young Man is a work of gay fiction set in the world of modelling in 1980s New York, with an apparently-ageless central character and the spectre of AIDS on the horizon.

Dulwich Picture Gallery is staging an exhibition of the works of early 20th century painter British Winifred Knights

We consider a couple of recent supernatural/horror TV dramas - Outcast and Preacher.

Tom Sutcliffe's guests are Bidisha, Shahidha Bari and David Benedict. The producer is Oliver Jones.

Credits

Presenter
Tom Sutcliffe
Interviewed Guest
undefined Bidisha
Interviewed Guest
Shahidha Bari
Interviewed Guest
David Benedict
Producer
Oliver Jones

Saturday Review

V+A Revolution, Hell or High Water, Jonathan Safran Foer, Inn At Lydda, BBC TV comedy pilots

Hell or High Water, Jonathan Safran Foer, V+A Revolution, Inn At Lydda, BBC comedy pilots

Jeff Bridges in Hell or High Water, Jonathan Safran Foer's Here I Am, V+A You Say You Want A Revolution, Globe Theatre's Inn At Lydda, BBC TV comedy pilots.

Jeff Bridges stars as a Texas Ranger on the hunt for a couple of bank robber brothers in a modern day western Hell or High Water

Jonathan Safran Foer's Here I Am combines a domestic breakdown with an international world-shattering incident.

London's V+A Museum's new exhibition You Say You Want A Revolution looks at global changes between 1966 -1970 when the world seemed to be be in a state of political upheaval

The Globe Theatre's new production, The Inn At Lydda is an imagining of Tiberius Caesar's journey to meet Jesus. But he arrives just after the crucifixion

The BBC is celebrating 60 years since Tony Hancock's TV sitcom debut with a clutch of comedy pilots - are they a continuation of a noble tradition or a pale imitation?

Tom Sutcliffe's guests are Philip Hensher, Kate Williams and Muriel Zhaga. The producer is Oliver Jones.

Credits

Presenter
Tom Sutcliffe
Interviewed Guest
Philip Hensher
Interviewed Guest
Kate Williams
Interviewed Guest
Muriel Zhaga
Producer
Oliver Jones

Saturday Review

Glenda Jackson as King Lear, The Innocents, Linda Grant, Elton John's photographs in Radical Eye, Close to the Enemy

King Lear, The Innocents, Linda Grant, Elton John's Radical Eye, Close to the Enemy.

Glenda Jackson plays King Lear, French/Polish film The Innocents, Linda Grant's The Dark Circle, Elton John's photographs at Tate Modern, Poliakoff's Close to the Enemy on BBC TV.

Glenda Jackson returns to the stage after 25 years as an MP to play the title role in King Lear at London's Old Vic Theatre. Is she a frail 80 year old or a commanding presence?

French/Polish film The Innocents is based on a true story about a convent in post-war Poland where the nuns were raped by Soviet soldiers.

Linda Grant's latest novel The Dark Circle tells the story of Lenny and Miriam, two east-enders convalescing in a TB sanatorium in 1940s Kent

The Radical Eye, Modernist Photography from the Sir Elton John Collection is the new exhibition at London's Tate Modern. Pinner's favourite son has been purchasing work by the world's leading photographers for more than 2 decades and created one of the leading private collections in the world.

Stephen Poliakoff's Close to the Enemy on BBC TV is set in London immediately after WWII as a special British Army unit tries to turn former Nazi scientists to work for 'us' now

Tom Sutcliffe's guests are Rosie Boycott, Melissa Harrison and Ryan Gilbey. The producer is Oliver Jones.

Credits

Presenter
Tom Sutcliffe
Interviewed Guest
Rosie Boycott
Interviewed Guest
Melissa Harrison
Interviewed Guest
Ryan Gilbey
Producer
Oliver Jones

Saturday Review

Lion, Raising Martha, Laszlo Krasznahorkai, material/rearranged/to/be - Siobhan Davies, Apple Tree Yard

Reviews of the Oscar-touted film Lion and Raising Martha at London's Park Theatre.

A review of the week's cultural highlights, including the Oscar-touted film Lion, Raising Martha at London's Park Theatre and Laszlo Krasznahorkai's novel The Last Wolf.

Lion is the film about a young Indian orphan adopted by Australian parents who finds his way back to the village where he was born by using the internet. starring Dev Patel and Nicole Kidman. Could it be Oscar-winning material?

Raising Martha is a new comedy play at London's Park Theatre - it's farce about frogs, families, dozy policemen and digging up corpses.

Hungarian prize-winning novelist Laszlo Krasznahorkai's latest novel The Last Wolf tells a story in one 74 page sentence - does this feat overwhelm the content?

Siobhan Davies' dance work material/rearranged/to/be is at London's Barbican

BBC TV has a new Sunday night drama: Apple Tree Yard. Adapted from Louise Doughty's best-selling thriller novel, what makes it feel new?

Tom Sutcliffe's guests are Bridget Minamore, Elizabeth Day and Inua Ellams. The producer is Oliver Jones.

Credits

Presenter
Tom Sutcliffe
Interviewed Guest
Bridget Minamore
Interviewed Guest
Elizabeth Day
Interviewed Guest
Inua Ellams
Producer
Oliver Jones

Saturday Review

Christine,The Nix, Estorick Collection, Death Takes a Holiday, Zelda Fitzgerald

Rebecca Hall in Christine, Nathan Hill's The Nix and Zelda Fitzgerald on Amazon.

Rebecca Hall in Christine, Nathan Hill's The Nix, the re-opening of The Estorick Collection, Death Takes a Holiday at The Charing Cross Theatre and Zelda Fitzgerald on Amazon.

The Estorick Collection in London has reopened after a refit with an exhibition 'War In The Sunshine: The British in Italy 1917-1918'; paintings and photographs from that conflict

The Nix is the first novel by Nathan Hill, about a son trying to understand his counter-culture mother who has gained notoriety after attacking a right wing politician

Rebecca Hall was tipped for an Oscar for playing Christine Chubbuck, a TV newsreader who committed suicide live on air in 1974. Will our reviewers feel Rebecca Hall was cheated out of a nomination

The musical Death takes a Holiday opens at London's Charing Cross Theatre. Created by a multi-TONY Award winning team, will London theatre-goers take it to their hearts?

Amazon TV's new series 'Z: The Beginning of Everything', stars Christina Ricci as Zelda Fitzgerald, American socialite, novelist and wife of F Scott Fitzgerald who was troubled with psychiatric problems

Tom Sutcliffe's guests are Catherine O'Flynn, Sarah Moss and Robert Hanks. The producer is Oliver Jones.

Credits

Presenter
Tom Sutcliffe
Interviewed Guest
Catherine O'Flynn
Interviewed Guest
Sarah Moss
Interviewed Guest
Robert Hanks
Producer
Oliver Jones

Saturday Review

La La Land, Manchester By The Sea, Michael Chabon, Wish List at The Royal Court, Charles Avery

La La Land, Manchester By The Sea, Michael Chabon, Katherine Soper, Charles Avery.

Two films touted for Oscars glory: La La Land and Manchester By The Sea. Michael Chabon's Moonglow. Katherine Soper's Wish List at London's Royal Court, Charles Avery's Island.

We can help you to decide between two films touted for Oscars glory: La La Land revives The Hollywood musical and Manchester By The Sea starring Casey Affleck- If you have to choose, which one deserves your custom?

Michael Chabon's latest novel Moonglow is sort-of autobiographical - the lies, deception, rumours, legends, confessions and confusions that all families create are explored through a life lived in The American Century.

Katherine Soper (a 24-year-old former perfume seller) won The UK's biggest playwriting competition with Wish List; a play informed by what she calls the government's "systematic assault" on disabled and mentally ill people. It's being staged at London's Royal Court Theatre

Artist Charles Avery's work is an ongoing evolving depiction of an imaginary island. Through drawings, sculptures and texts. he has created its topology, cosmology and inhabitants. He has a new exhibition of his imaginings.

Tom Sutcliffe's guests are Kate Williams, Maria Delgado and David Benedict. The producer is Oliver Jones.

Credits

Presenter
Tom Sutcliffe
Interviewed Guest
Kate Williams
Interviewed Guest
Maria Delgado
Interviewed Guest
David Benedict
Producer
Oliver Jones

Saturday Review

Hull, City of Culture: Richard Bean's The Hypocrite, Helen Dunmore, Radio 4's Mars Season, Elle

Hull: City of Culture, The Hypocrite, Helen Dunmore, Radio 4's Mars Season, Elle.

Hull, City of Culture, including Richard Bean's The Hypocrite, Helen Dunmore's Birdcage Walk, Radio 4's Mars Season, Isabel Huppert in Verhoeven's prizewinning noir thriller Elle.

Hull is the 2017 City of Culture with a range of wondrous things happening including the premiere of native son Richard Bean's play The Hypocrite.

Helen Dunmore's latest novel Birdcage Walk is set in burgeoning 18th century Bristol

Radio 4's Mars Season includes a short series following in the footsteps of the martians (do martians have feet?) after their invasion of Earth began in Woking, in HG Well's War Of The Worlds

Isabel Huppert recently won a Cesar for her role as the victim of sexual violence in Paul Verhoeven's prizewinning noir thriller Elle

Tom Sutcliffe's guests are Deborah Moggach, Nihal and Joolz Denby. The producer is Oliver Jones.

Credits

Presenter
Tom Sutcliffe
Interviewed Guest
Deborah Moggach
Interviewed Guest
Nihal Arthanayake
Interviewed Guest
Joolz Denby
Producer
Oliver Jones

Saturday Review

Hateful Eight, Guys and Dolls, Maigret, Crime Museum, Jericho

Including a look at Quentin Tarantino's new film Hateful Eight.

The week's cultural highlights, including Tarantino's Hateful Eight, Guys and Dolls at London's Savoy Theatre, George Simenon's Maigret novels and ITV's historical drama Jericho.

Quentin Tarantino's film Hateful Eight - the work of a genius at the top of his game or more of the same?

The Chichester Festival Theatre's revival of Guys and Dolls has transferred to London's Savoy Theatre

George Simenon wrote 75 Maigret novels and they're all being republished - how well do they stand up nowadays?

The Metropolitan Police's Crime Museum is usually closed to the public but The Museum of London has a temporary exhibition showing 600 of the 2000 items it contains; fascinating and gruesome certainly... but is it distasteful?

ITV's historical drama Jericho looks at the lives of the Victorian navvies who built the great engineering edifices of the age

Tom Sutcliffe's guests are David Schneider, Sophie Hannah and Dreda Say Mitchell. The producer is Oliver Jones.

Credits

Presenter
Tom Sutcliffe
Interviewed Guest
David Schneider
Interviewed Guest
Sophie Hannah
Interviewed Guest
Dreda Say Mitchell
Producer
Oliver Jones

Saturday Review

Hieronymus Bosch, OJ Simpson, North Water, A Bigger Splash, Battlefield

A look at the biggest Hieronymus Bosch exhibition ever and OJ Simpson's trial as a drama.

The week's cultural highlights, including the biggest Hieronymus Bosch exhibition ever, OJ Simpson's trial as a TV drama and Ian McGuire's North Water.

The biggest Hieronymus Bosch exhibition ever has just opened in Holland. 500 years after his death, Noordbrabants Museum has gathered together the largest collection of his bizarre, extraordinary work

OJ Simpson's 1994 trial has been turned into a US TV drama. Does it have something new to show or say?

Ian McGuire's North Water has garnered positive reviews from the likes of Hilary Mantel and Martin Amis. It's a whodunnit set on board an 18th century whaling ship. "A version of Captain Ahab (if you squint a little) meets a version of Sherlock Holmes"

Ralph Fiennes stars in A Bigger Splash, a tale of louche life set around a swimming pool in a baking hot Italian villa. Also starring Tilda Swinton, Matthius Schoenaerts and Dakota Johnson

Battlefield at The Young Vic is Peter Brook's distillation of his magnum opus Mahabarata. A few short tales which deal with life an immense canvas in miniature

Tom Sutcliffe is joined by Amanda Vickery, Natalie Haynes and Jim White. The producer is Oliver Jones.

Credits

Presenter
Tom Sutcliffe
Interviewed Guest
Amanda Vickery
Interviewed Guest
Natalie Haynes
Interviewed Guest
Jim White
Producer
Oliver Jones

Saturday Review

Lionel Shriver, Everybody Wants Some!!, Green Room, The Complete Deaths, Gillian Wearing

Lionel Shriver, Everybody Wants Some!!, Green Room, The Complete Deaths, Gillian Wearing.

Lionel Shriver's The Mandibles, Richard Linklater's Everybody Wants Some!!, horror film Green Room, Spy Monkey's The Complete Deaths, and Gillian Wearing's A Room With Your Views.

Lionel Shriver's The Mandibles imagines a dystopian America of the future

Richard Linklater's follow-up to his Oscar-nominated tour de force Boyhood is meant to be the spiritual sequel to 1993's Dazed and Confused. Everybody Wants Some!! looks at a group of baseball scholarship students settling-in at a Texas university

Horror Thriller film Green Room has been making some audience members vomit and faint -how well will our reviewers cope?

At the Brighton Festival: Spy Monkey's The Complete Deaths brings all of the grim and ghastly killings from Shakespeare's works into one gruesome play

Gillian Wearing's A Room With Your Views captures a snapshot of views from windows around the world - what does it reveal?

Tom Sutcliffe's guests are Damian Barr, Viv Groskop and Rebecca Stott. The producer is Oliver Jones.

Credits

Presenter
Tom Sutcliffe
Interviewed Guest
Damian Barr
Interviewed Guest
Viv Groskop
Interviewed Guest
Rebecca Stott
Producer
Oliver Jones

Saturday Review

Apostasy, Exit The King, Olivia Laing, Memory Palace, Pride and Prejudice box set

Apostasy, Exit The King, Olivia Laing - Crudo, White Cube Memory Palace, Pride & Prejudice

Apostasy: a film about Jehovah's Witnesses, Patrick Marber's Exit The King, Olivia Laing's first novel: Crudo, White Cube Gallery's Memory Palace, BBC Pride and Prejudice box set.

Apostasy is a British film about disfellowship in Jehovah's Witness congregations. How do families cope when their religious beliefs come into conflict with contemporary social mores.

London's National Theatre is staging its first production of a play by Eugene Ionesco. Adapted and directed by Patrick Marber, Exit The King stars Rhys Ifans as a monarch who knows he will die before the end of the play.

Olivia Laing's first novel Crudo was written in real time in 7 weeks during 2017, recording her thoughts on the news of the day, "to get an imprint of the moment while it is still wet".

White Cube Gallery's newest exhibition marks its 25th anniversary. Memory Palace is on at their two London sites (as well as at their Hong Kong gallery, but we didn't go there!) looking at memory and how it shapes our identities.

BBCTV has put the 1995 adaptation of Pride and Prejudice (you know, the one where Colin Firth comes out of the lake clad in a clinging shirt) on iPlayer as a box set, we consider whether the fond memories of it match up to a re-watching 22 years on...

Tom Sutcliffe's guests are Alex Preston, Kate Williams and Abigail Morris. The producer is Oliver Jones.

Credits

Presenter
Tom Sutcliffe
Interviewed Guest
Alex Preston
Interviewed Guest
Kate Williams
Interviewed Guest
Abigail Morris
Producer
Oliver Jones

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