Showing results for your search filters

Results 1 to 16 of 16
  • Page 1

Front Row

Robert Pattinson, Ian McMillan, the voice behind the puppet, Goldsmiths Prize winner

BBC Radio 4
BBC Radio 4 logo
30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Robert Pattinson, Ian McMillan, the voices behind the puppets, Goldsmith Prize winner.

Robert Pattinson on his new film Good Time, Ian McMillan on writing a libretto in the South Yorkshire accent, and the winner of the Goldsmiths Prize is revealed.

Robert Pattinson on his new film Good Time, set in the streets of Queens as the consequences of a bank robbery entangle his character Connie in a violent web of swift, provocative responses and lies. It's a million miles from Twilight and he talks about his choice of films since his role in the hugely successful franchise.

Poet Ian McMillan has written libretto for the first opera to be performed in a South Yorkshire accent, including local dialect. We speak to Ian and the tenor Nicholas Sales, of Heritage Opera, about the challenges of singing in the cadences of a Barnsley voice.

With Paddington back in cinemas, and the bear's voice once again being provided by Ben Whishaw - a far cry from that of Michael Hordern in the TV series in the '70s - Adam Smith considers the importance of the voice of an animated character, and what happens when the familiar tones are replaced by the voice of another actor.

The Goldsmiths Prize is awarded annually and celebrates inventive writing. Previous winners include Eimear McBride and Ali Smith. As the 2017 prize is awarded this evening, we'll be announcing the result and talking to the winner from the ceremony.

Presenter: Samira Ahmed

Producer: Rebecca Armstrong.

Credits

Presenter
Samira Ahmed
Interviewed Guest
Robert Pattinson
Interviewed Guest
Ian McMillan
Interviewed Guest
Nicholas Sales
Interviewed Guest
Adam Smith
Producer
Rebecca Armstrong

Brand

Front Row

Front Row

Urban myths, Author Michael Chabon, The Snow Maiden opera, Presidents on film

BBC Radio 4
BBC Radio 4 logo
30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Author Michael Chabon; urban myths retold on TV; and Opera North's The Snow Maiden.

Urban myths of true-ish celeb stories retold as TV drama; Pulitzer Prize-winning author Michael Chabon on new book Moonglow; Opera North's The Snow Maiden; and presidents on film.

Urban Myths, the new Sky Arts drama series, re-imagines 'True-ish stories', starting with Bob Dylan's infamous visit to Euythmic's star Dave Stewart's Crouch End flat. Julia Raeside reviews the series which has achieved notoriety by casting white actor Joseph Fiennes to play Michael Jackson in an episode which has subsequently been dropped.

Pulitzer Prize-winning author Michael Chabon discusses his latest novel Moonglow, in which a dying grandfather tells the secrets of his life to his grandson. His stories are in turn bawdy and moving, violent and very funny. The novel has just been nominated for the National Book Critics Circle awards in the US.

Rimsky-Korsakov's opera, The Snow Maiden hasn't been staged in the UK for 60 years, but director John Fulljames is about to put that right. He's taking Opera North's new production of the Russian folk-tale inspired work on tour to Newcastle, Salford, Belfast, and Nottingham.

Ahead of Donald Trump's inauguration tomorrow as the 45th President of the United States, film writer Adam Smith looks back at cinema's depiction of the Commander in Chief, from Peter Sellers in Dr Strangelove to Alan Rickman as Reagan and Daniel Day Lewis as Abraham Lincoln.

Credits

Interviewed Guest
Julia Raeside
Interviewed Guest
Michael Chabon
Interviewed Guest
John Fulljames
Interviewed Guest
Adam Smith

Brand

Front Row

Front Row

Woodstock, Birger Larsen on Murder, Hacks in the spotlight, Trouble at the opera

BBC Radio 4
BBC Radio 4 logo
30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

John Wilson talks to Barney Hoskyns about his book on Woodstock - the town.

John Wilson talks to Barney Hoskyns about his book on Woodstock - the town, not the festival, and The Killing director Birger Larsen discusses new BBC Two drama Murder.

When most people think of Woodstock their mind immediately turns to the 1969 festival - but Woodstock is 60 miles away from the site of the festival. Small Town Talk by Barney Hoskyns provides an insight into the lives of the stars who lived there including Bob Dylan, Jimmy Hendrix, Janis Joplin and Van Morrison.

The Killing director Birger Larsen discusses his latest film, The Third Voice. This is the first episode of Murder, a three-part BBC Two drama, in which the characters speak exclusively to the camera.

Spotlight is rare among recent films, in that it treats reporters as other than corrupt and venal. Adam Smith considers cinema's changing portrayal of newspaper journalists, from bold crusaders for truth to greedy slime-balls, and everything in between.

And, on the day the chorus voted to go on strike...what exactly is going on at the English National Opera.

Presenter John Wilson

Producer Julian May.

Credits

Presenter
John Wilson
Interviewed Guest
Barney Hoskyns
Interviewed Guest
Birger Larsen
Interviewed Guest
Adam Smith
Producer
Julian May

Brand

Front Row

Front Row

Brian Cox; Helen McCrory; Sci-fi at the Barbican; Rebooting film franchises

BBC Radio 4
BBC Radio 4 logo
30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Brian Cox on playing Churchill and a review of The Barbican's sci-fi exhibition.

Brian Cox on playing Churchill, Sophia McDougall reviews The Barbican's sci-fi exhibition, Helen McCrory on her role in Fearless and Adam Smith on re-booting film franchises.

Brian Cox discusses playing the most famous man in British politics in his new film Churchill.

Sci-fi writer Sophia McDougall reviews the Barbican's new exhibition : Into The Unknown, A Journey Into Science Fiction.

From Cherie Blair to Medea via Narcissa Malfoy in Harry Potter, and Polly Blair of Peaky Blinders, Helen McCrory has played many strong women. Her latest is Emma Banville, a campaigning lawyer who fights to free a man she believes was wrongfully convicted of killing a schoolgirl, a part created for her by Homeland writer Patrick Harbinson. Helen McCrory reveals why she wanted to be in Fearless and why she'll always be an actress, not an actor.

This year has already seen new re-boots of many classic film franchises, including Alien, Pirates of the Caribbean, Wonder Woman and The Mummy. With more in the pipeline for this summer, Adam Smith considers what it takes to breathe new life into an old brand (and whether it's a good idea in the first place...)

Presenter : Samira Ahmed

Producer : Rebecca Armstrong.

Credits

Presenter
Samira Ahmed
Producer
Rebecca Armstrong
Interviewed Guest
Brian Cox
Interviewed Guest
Sophia McDougall
Interviewed Guest
Helen McCrory
Interviewed Guest
Adam Smith

Brand

Front Row

Front Row

Tracey Thorn, Jekyll and Hyde, Howard Brenton on Magna Carta

BBC Radio 4
BBC Radio 4 logo
30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Tracey Thorn of Everything But the Girl discusses her solo career. John Wilson presents.

Arts news with John Wilson, including Tracey Thorn on her new compilation of solo work, ITV's new drama Jekyll and Hyde reviewed and playwright Howard Brenton on Magna Carta.

Tracey Thorn, singer-songwriter and one half of Everything But the Girl, discusses her work as a solo artist, which forms the basis of a new two-disc compilation.

ITV's new adaptation of the Jekyll and Hyde story begins this Sunday. Greg Tate, lecturer in Victorian literature, talks us through how TV and film have made use of the character over the years.

As part of the commemoration of the Magna Carta's 800th anniversary, Salisbury Playhouse has commissioned four internationally-known dramatists to write new plays inspired by the document, said to be the origin of the liberties and the rule of law we enjoy today. Playwrights Howard Brenton and Sally Woodcock discuss their separate dramas.

Credits

Presenter
John Wilson
Interviewed Guest
Tracey Thorn
Interviewed Guest
Greg Tate
Interviewed Guest
Howard Brenton
Interviewed Guest
Sally Woodcock
Interviewed Guest
Adam Smith
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

Brand

Front Row

Front Row

The Bridge stars, Jonathan Lethem, RS Thomas

BBC Radio 4
BBC Radio 4 logo
30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Arts news with Mark Thomas, including the strange case of RS Thomas and the crisp packet.

The stars of Nordic noir TV series The Bridge, the strange case of RS Thomas and the crisp packet, novelist Jonathan Lethem on the history of the Communist party in the USA.

Jonathan Lethem talks about his latest novel Dissident Gardens. It's an epic family novel criss-crossing generations from the '50s to the present day, focussing on Rose, an American Communist. Based on his own upbringing and radical grandmother, Lethem describes how even as a youngster he guessed he'd never be able to stand for President, as there surely would have been a 'problem with my files'.

This weekend the final two episodes of The Bridge are screened on BBC4. The series, which has spawned many international remakes, follows a Swedish and a Danish detective working on a case together, and explores the cultural differences that inform their relationship. Sofia Helin and Kim Bodnia, aka detectives Saga Norén and Martin Rohde, discuss the surprise popularity of the show and the challenges of acting with someone who is speaking a different language.

This week a crisps manufacturing company admitted they had used a photograph of the late Welsh poet R.S. Thomas to advertise a competition on their packets, without knowing who he was. Thomas's biographer Byron Rogers reflects on the strange case of the poet and the crisp packet.

Many of this year's Oscar contenders claim to be 'based on a true story', among them 12 Years a Slave, Philomena, Saving Mr Banks, Captain Phillips and The Wolf of Wall St. Adam Smith has been digging around and begs to take issue with the veracity the film-makers claim.

Producer Stephen Hughes.

Credits

Presenter
Mark Lawson
Interviewed Guest
Jonathan Lethem
Interviewed Guest
Sofia Helin
Interviewed Guest
Kim Bodnia
Interviewed Guest
Byron Rogers
Interviewed Guest
Adam Smith
Producer
Stephen Hughes

Brand

Front Row

Front Row

Playing Rosalind, Timbuktu reviewed, Literary Festivals

BBC Radio 4
BBC Radio 4 logo
30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Juliet Stevenson, Niamh Cusack and Michelle Terry on playing Rosalind. With Kirsty Lang.

Juliet Stevenson, Niamh Cusack and Michelle Terry on playing Rosalind, Timbuktu reviewed by Lindsey Hilsum, the economics of literary festivals and remakes of films from the 1980s.

As a new production of As You Like It opens at the Globe Theatre in London, Michelle Terry talks about taking on the role of Rosalind, arguably Shakespeare's meatiest female role. Actors Niamh Cusack and Juliet Stevenson who've played her in the past also describe the pleasures and challenges of playing her.

Timbuktu was nominated for Best Foreign Film at the Oscars and depicts what happens to one family when the city is overrun by fanatical jihadis. Channel 4 News' International Editor Lindsey Hilsum reviews.

As the Hay Festival gets under way, Front Row takes a look at how literary festivals have multiplied in recent years. Are they all economically sustainable? Kirsty asks Peter Florence, director of the Hay Festival; Fiona Razvi of the Wimbledon Bookfest, and bestselling Chocolat author Joanne Harris.

Step into the cinema and you might feel you've stepped back in time - re-makes of films from the 1980s including Mad Max, Poltergeist, Ghostbusters and Terminator are currently showing or due to hit our screens soon. Adam Smith muses on why so many movies from the 1980s, not known as a great decade for classic cinema, are having a revival.

Presenter: Kirsty Lang

Producer: Sarah Johnson.

Credits

Presenter
Kirsty Lang
Interviewed Guest
Juliet Stevenson
Interviewed Guest
Niamh Cusack
Interviewed Guest
Michelle Terry
Interviewed Guest
Lindsey Hilsum
Interviewed Guest
Peter Florence
Interviewed Guest
Fiona Razvi
Interviewed Guest
Joanne Harris
Interviewed Guest
Adam Smith
Producer
Sarah Johnson

Brand

Front Row

Front Row

Amy Poehler, Syrian musicians, Agatha Christie's Partners in Crime

BBC Radio 4
BBC Radio 4 logo
30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Comedian Amy Poehler talks about Pixar's new film Inside Out. John Wilson presents.

Arts news with John Wilson, including Amy Poehler on Pixar's new film Inside Out, two Syrian musicians on working in exile and a review of Agatha Christie drama Partners in Crime.

Comedian and actress Amy Poehler discusses her role as Joy, the emotion trying to keep control in the young protagonist's head in Pixar's new animated film Inside Out.

Partners in Crime is a new venture between the BBC and the Agatha Christie Group. Starring David Walliams and Jessica Raine as the lesser-known amateur Christie sleuths Tommy and Tuppence, it's an adventure series set in the 1950s with espionage and humour at its heart. Crime writer Natasha Cooper reviews.

To mark this year's Shubbak Festival, London's biennial festival of contemporary Arab arts and culture, John Wilson speaks to two Syrian musicians - leading electronic artist Samer Saem Eldahr and award-winning Syrian composer Zaid Jabri - about working in exile, and drawing on both Arab and European musical traditions.

And with the announcement of a new medical breakthrough which claims to make human head transplants a reality in the near future, Adam Smith offers advice on how cinema can provide a sober guiding light.

Presenter John Wilson

Producer Olivia Skinner.

Credits

Presenter
John Wilson
Interviewed Guest
Amy Poehler
Interviewed Guest
Natasha Cooper
Interviewed Guest
Samer Saem Eldahr
Interviewed Guest
Zaid Jabri
Interviewed Guest
Adam Smith
Producer
Olivia Skinner

Brand

Front Row

Front Row

Ridley Scott's Exodus, Serial, The Shoemaker's Holiday, Annie

BBC Radio 4
BBC Radio 4 logo
30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Ridley Scott's Exodus, serial podcast, The Shoemaker's Holiday and Quvenzhane Wallis.

Arts news. Ridley Scott's Exodus reviewed, the phenomenon of the Serial podcasts, Phillip Breen on The Shoemaker's Holiday, and Quvenzhane Wallis and director Will Gluck on Annie.

Ridley Scott's Moses epic Exodus: Gods and Kings is reviewed by Adam Smith; investigative journalist John Sweeney and Baltimore-based crime novelist Laura Lippman discuss the phenomenon of the 'Serial' podcasts; The Shoemaker's Holiday director Phillip Breen tells Samira Ahmed about his RSC production of Thomas Dekker's Elizabethan comedy of class, conflict and cobblers in love; and Quvenzhané Wallis and director Will Gluck on their new film adaptation of Annie.

Producer Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Presenter
Samira Ahmed
Interviewed Guest
Adam Smith
Interviewed Guest
John Sweeney
Interviewed Guest
Laura Lippman
Interviewed Guest
Phillip Breen
Interviewed Guest
Quvenzhane Wallis
Interviewed Guest
Will Gluck
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

Brand

Front Row

Front Row

Eddie Redmayne and Felicity Jones; Renee Fleming; Billie Whitelaw remembered

BBC Radio 4
BBC Radio 4 logo
30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Eddie Redmayne and Felicity Jones on The Theory of Everything.

Eddie Redmayne and Felicity Jones on The Theory of Everything, soprano Renee Fleming on her new album, Billie Whitelaw remembered, and the dark side of Christmas films.

Eddie Redmayne and Felicity Jones talk to John Wilson about their new film The Theory of Everything about the physicist Stephen Hawking; soprano Renée Fleming on her new album Christmas in New York; Billie Whitelaw remembered by former theatre critic Benedict Nightingale; and Adam Smith considers the dark side of Christmas films.

Producer Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Presenter
John Wilson
Interviewed Guest
Eddie Redmayne
Interviewed Guest
Felicity Jones
Interviewed Guest
Renee Fleming
Interviewed Guest
Adam Smith
Interviewed Guest
Benedict Nightingale
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

Brand

Front Row

Doctor Who

Series 5 Episode 4: The Time of Angels

BBC One
BBC One logo
45 minutes Available for 6 months First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

The Doctor hunts the last of the Weeping Angels through the terrifying Maze of the Dead.

The Doctor, River Song and Amy hunt the last of the Weeping Angels through the terrifying Maze of the Dead.

Doctor Who

Series 5 Episode 5: Flesh and Stone

BBC One
BBC One logo
45 minutes Available for 6 months First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Surrounded by an army of Weeping Angels, the Doctor must escape through the forest vault.

Surrounded by an army of Weeping Angels, the Doctor must escape through the forest vault before facing a final, petrifying challenge...

Doctor Who

Series 5 Episode 1: The Eleventh Hour

BBC One
BBC One logo
1 hour, 5 minutes Available for 6 months First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

The new Doctor has 20 minutes to save the world, and only Amy Pond can help him.

The new Doctor has 20 minutes to save the world, and only Amy Pond - the girl who waited - can help him.

Credits

The Doctor
Matt Smith
Amy Pond
Karen Gillan
Rory Williams
Arthur Darvill
Amelia
Caitlin Blackwood
Dr Ramsden
Nina Wadia
Barney Collins
Marcello Magni
Ice Cream Man
Perry Benson
Mrs Angelo
Annette Crosbie
Mother
Olivia Colman
Child 1
Eden Monteath
Child 2
Merin Monteath
Mr Henderson
Arthur Cox
Atraxi Voice
David de Keyser
Writer
Steven Moffat
Producer
Tracie Simpson
Director
Adam Smith

Front Row

Roddy Doyle; Josie Rourke; Liola reviewed; Why modern Westerns don't work

BBC Radio 4
BBC Radio 4 logo
30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Roddy Doyle on the return of his character Jimmy Rabbitte in his new novel The Guts.

Roddy Doyle on the return of his character Jimmy Rabbitte in his new novel The Guts, Liola at the National Theatre reviewed, and director Josie Rourke shares her Cultural Exchange.

With Kirsty Lang.

Booker Prize-winning Irish author Roddy Doyle discusses why he decided to resurrect one of his earliest characters - Jimmy Rabbitte who first appeared in The Commitments 25 years ago - in his new novel The Guts. He also reflects on topics of conversation among men his own age, and offers his top tip to stop snoring.

Sir Richard Eyre has returned to the National Theatre to direct Liola, a drama by the Italian playwright Luigi Pirandello. Set in rural Sicily at the end of the 19th century, the play centres on Liola - a charming young man who has caused controversy by fathering three sons with different women. Andrew Dickson reviews the new version by Tanya Ronder, which is performed by an Irish cast.

The theatre director Josie Rourke brings the 1987 comedy drama film Broadcast News, starring William Hurt and Holly Hunter, to the Cultural Exchange.

Disney's summer blockbuster The Lone Ranger, which stars Johnny Depp as Tonto, has flopped at the US box office and is expected to lose millions of dollars. Adam Smith explains why, despite many attempts to re-vamp the genre, Westerns from Wild Wild West, via Cowboys and Aliens to Jonah Hex have failed to deliver.

Producer Olivia Skinner.

Credits

Presenter
Kirsty Lang
Interviewed Guest
Roddy Doyle
Interviewed Guest
Josie Rourke
Interviewed Guest
Adam Smith
Producer
Olivia Skinner
Editor
John Goudie

Brand

Front Row

Front Row

John Agard; David Walliams in Big School; CJ Sansom on Doctor Who

BBC Radio 4
BBC Radio 4 logo
30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Poet John Agard, Big School reviewed, C J Sansom on Doctor Who, and films you can't watch.

John Agard explains why water and cricket inspire his poetry, David Walliams in Big School, crime novelist CJ Sansom on Doctor Who, and films you can't watch. Mark Lawson presents.

With Mark Lawson

David Walliams writes, and stars in Big School as the Deputy Head of Chemistry in a comprehensive school who's smitten by the new French teacher, Catherine Tate, but finds a love rival in the shape of PE master Philip Glenister. Critic and ex-teacher Natalie Haynes delivers her verdict.

Award winning poet John Agard received the Queen's Gold Medal for Poetry earlier this year. Agard, who was born in Guyana and moved to Britain in 1977, talks about what the award means to him. He also discusses how his dual heritage and cricket were sources of inspiration for his latest collection Travel Light Travel Dark.

Jerry Lewis' film about a clown who entertains children in a concentration camp, The Day the Clown Cried, has never been shown to the public after the comedian decided he was too embarrassed for it to be screened. Yesterday, footage from a behind-the-scenes documentary emerged online over 40 years after it was made, allowing us a glimpse of a film we never thought we'd see. Critic Adam Smith considers other films that suffered the same fate.

Plus in tonight's Cultural Exchange, C J Sansom - author of the historical crime series Shardlake - picks the first incarnation of the Doctor in Doctor Who, William Hartnell.

Credits

Presenter
Mark Lawson
Interviewed Guest
John Agard
Interviewed Guest
Adam Smith
Interviewed Guest
CJ Sansom
Producer
Kate Bullivant
Editor
John Goudie

Brand

Front Row

Front Row

Michael Bond on Paddington, Lloyd Newson, Edward Snowden documentary

BBC Radio 4
BBC Radio 4 logo
30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Arts news with Kirsty Lang, including Michael Bond on the new Paddington Bear film.

Arts news with Kirsty Lang. Michael Bond on Paddington Bear, Lloyd Newson of DV8 on his new work John, and Laura Poitras on Citizenfour, her documentary about Edward Snowden.

Michael Bond, the creator of the much-loved Paddington Bear, joins Kirsty Lang. He'll be talking about writing in Paddington's voice for the first time in a new collection of letters to the bear's Aunt Lucy, Love From Paddington. And he reveals his role in the new Paddington film.

Documentary film maker Laura Poitras discusses Citizenfour, her film about being contacted by the mystery whistle blower who eventually revealed himself as Edward Snowden.

The dance theatre company DV8 premieres a new verbatim dance work, John, at the National Theatre. Artistic Director Lloyd Newson discusses the art of making a dance documentary.

And as pumpkins make their annual appearance, Adam Smith considers how what was once beyond the pale in horror films is now unremarkable.

Presenter: Kirsty Lang

Producer: Sarah Johnson.

Credits

Presenter
Kirsty Lang
Interviewed Guest
Michael Bond
Interviewed Guest
Laura Poitras
Interviewed Guest
Lloyd Newson
Interviewed Guest
Adam Smith
Producer
Sarah Johnson

Brand

Front Row
Results 1 to 16 of 16
  • Page 1

Search Help.

To find all currently available programmes, do a completely empty search.

To find something specific, add your search term and hit enter. Optionally, combine your query with a variety of filters to narrow your results. You can also search by using just the filters and an empty search box.

Using Search Filters.

Media Type filter:
Limit your search to either TV or radio using the radio buttons. Results will show both by default.
Genre Accessibility and Availability filters:
Add or exclude search terms using the add and exclude filter icons.

When you've chosen your filters, hit enter or use the 'Apply Filters' button.

Once a search is returned, add or exclude further terms from the results page and search again. Search results can be reordered by:

  • first or last brodcast dates,
  • availability ending soon,
  • relevance.

Find out more about BBC Programme Explorer