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Front Row

19/06/2014

BBC Radio 4
BBC Radio 4 logo
30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Actor Don Johnson, author Carys Bray, Pablo Neruda poems discovered.

Actor Don Johnson on the art of the comeback, novelist and former Mormon Carys Bray, new Pablo Neruda poems discovered, and why established authors are choosing to self-publish.

Don Johnson became a household name through his role as shiny suited Miami police officer Sonny Crockett in Miami Vice. He discusses the art of the comeback as he stars alongside Sam Shepherd in new film Cold in July. Novelist Carys Bray discusses her own devout Mormon upbringing in the North-West of England which lies at the heart of her debut novel A Song For Issy Bradley. As new poems are discovered by Nobel Prize-winning Chilean poet Pablo Neruda, we speak to his acclaimed biographer Adam Feinstein about their significance. Plus we discuss why some established authors are choosing to self-publish their work with writer Kate Pullinger and Cathy Rentzenbrink of the Bookseller.

Credits

Presenter
Samira Ahmed
Interviewed Guest
Don Johnson
Interviewed Guest
Carys Bray
Interviewed Guest
Adam Feinstein
Interviewed Guest
Kate Pullinger
Interviewed Guest
Cathy Rentzenbrink
Producer
Ella-mai Robey

Brand

Front Row

Free Thinking

Barbara Kruger, Laurie Penny, The Minds of Molecules

BBC Radio 3
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45 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:

Samira Ahmed talks to American artist Barbara Kruger and journalist Laurie Penny.

American artist Barbara Kruger often uses black and white images overlaid with bold captions exploring gender and identity. She discusses feminism with journalist Laurie Penny.

American artist Barbara Kruger is wrapping the upper gallery of Modern Art Oxford in one of her bold juxtapositions of images and captions which explore our attitudes to gender and identity.

Journalist Laurie Penny writes for the New Statesman, Vice, Salon and The Guardian on a range of issues including feminism and activism.

They join Samira Ahmed in the Free Thinking Studio.

Tying in with the commemoration of World War 1 on Radio 3 and Radio 4 we talk to author and cartoonist Posy Simmonds about the role of cartoonists responding to politics and international affairs as she unveils a commission from 14-18 NOW which will go on show at the Cartoon Museum and accompany '1914: Day by Day' on Radio 4.

And we have another column from one of Radio 3 and the AHRC''s 2014 New Generation Thinkers. Will Abberley from the University of Oxford reflects on the minds of molecules.

Laurie Penny's new book is Unspeakable Things: Sex Lies and Revolution

Barbara Kruger's work is on show at Modern Art Oxford June 28th - August 31st.

1914 Day by Day runs at The Cartoon Museum June 26th - October 19th.

Producer: Georgia Catt

Image: Barbara Kruger, (Untitled) Talk is Cheap, 1985

Courtesy Sprüth Magers Berlin London.

Credits

Interviewed Guest
Barbara Kruger
Interviewed Guest
Laurie Penny
Interviewed Guest
Will Abberley
Presenter
Samira Ahmed
Producer
Georgia Catt

Front Row

Hacksaw Ridge, film; Jamie, new musical; author Vic James; the allure of Napoleon; some Robert Burns

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Hacksaw Ridge, new musical Jamie, author Vic Jame, allure of Napoleon, some Robert Burns.

A war film with a pacifist hero, a musical about a boy who wants to be a drag queen, an exhibition about the fascination with Napoleon, an online hit novel and a bit of Burns.

A new musical, Everybody's talking about Jamie, is based on the story of a 16 year old boy determined to go to his prom in a dress and become a drag queen. Samira Ahmed went to rehearsals to meet Dan Gillespie Sells from band The Feeling, and screenwriter Tom MacRae who have created their first musical, as well as Jamie Campbell, now 21, on whom it is based.

Vic James's debut novel, Gilded Cage, is set in a Britain where the magically-skilled aristocracy compels all commoners to serve them for ten years. Vic wrote it on Wattpad, an online storytelling website. It was read over a third of a million times and went on to win Wattpad's Talk of the Town award. She joins Samira, live.

The Allure of Napoleon is the opening exhibition in the Bowes Museum's year-long celebration of its 125th anniversary. Dr Tom Stammers, lecturer in European Cultural History at the University of Durham, discusses this show which presents Napoleon as one of the first celebrity statesmen, who burnished his ascent from political outsider to national leader with the power of art.

Hacksaw Ridge has six Oscar nominations; including Mel Gibson for Best Director. The film tells the true story of Desmond Doss, the first conscientious objector to earn the Congressional Medal of Honour for saving the lives of 75 soldiers in Okinawa, one of the bloodiest battles of WWII. It's been hailed as a new kind of war movie because it graphically exposes the effects of guns on the human body while celebrating a central character who refuses to pick one up. Michael Leader reviews.

This evening is Burns Night when, all over the world, people celebrate the great Scottish makar, Robert Burns. Front Row has a reading his work from Scotland's current Makar, Jackie Kay.

Producer: Julian May.

Credits

Presenter
Samira Ahmed
Interviewed Guest
Dan Gillespie Sells
Interviewed Guest
Tom MacRae
Interviewed Guest
Jamie Campbell
Interviewed Guest
Victoria James
Interviewed Guest
Tom Stammers
Interviewed Guest
Michael Leader
Interviewed Guest
Jackie Kay
Producer
Julian May

Brand

Front Row

Front Row

Evelyn Glennie, Christine, Mary Tyler Moore, Turner Contemporary, Garth Jennings

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Samira Ahmed talks to percussionist Evelyn Glennie.

Samira Ahmed talks to percussionist Evelyn Glennie, who is creating a piece of music with the residents of King's Cross, London. Plus Lyse Doucet discusses the film Christine.

Samira Ahmed talks to percussionist Dame Evelyn Glennie, who is inviting the residents of Kings Cross, London to help her create a new musical work over the next twelve months.

Lyse Doucet, the BBC's Chief International Correspondent, reviews the film Christine, which stars Rebecca Hall as American newscaster Christine Chubbuck, who killed herself live on TV in 1974.

Karen Krizanovich discusses the extraordinary television and film career of Mary Tyler Moore, whose death was announced today.

British director Garth Jennings, whose previous films include Son of Rambow and The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, ventures into the world of animation with the hit American musical comedy Sing.

And Andrea Rose reviews a new exhibition at Turner Contemporary Margate, featuring 40 international artists working with knitting, embroidery, weaving and sewing.

Presenter: Samira Ahmed

Producer: Timothy Prosser.

Credits

Presenter
Samira Ahmed
Interviewed Guest
Evelyn Glennie
Interviewed Guest
Lyse Doucet
Interviewed Guest
Karen Krizanovich
Interviewed Guest
Garth Jennings
Interviewed Guest
Andrea Rose
Producer
Timothy Prosser

Brand

Front Row

Front Row

A Streetcar Named Desire Review; Daniel Hope and Gabriel Prokofiev; Crime Writing; Summer Pop

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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A Streetcar Named Desire review, violinist Daniel Hope and composer Gabriel Prokofiev.

A Streetcar Named Desire, starring Gillian Anderson, reviewed, violinist Daniel Hope and composer Gabriel Prokofiev on their Prom, summer pop and crime reporters turned novelists.

Gillian Anderson stars in a new production of A Streetcar Named Desire at the Young Vic Theatre in London, which Matt Wolf reviews. Composer Gabriel Prokofiev and violinist Daniel Hope discuss their collaboration for tonight's Prom which features the world premiere of Gabriel's Violin Concerto 1914. Kate Mossman evokes the pop songs that conjure up summer. And the crime reporters who turn to crime novel-writing: Laura Lippman, former crime reporter at the Baltimore Sun and David Mark, former crime reporter at the Yorkshire Evening Post, discuss how their new careers in crime fiction have been influenced by their former trade.

Credits

Presenter
Samira Ahmed
Interviewed Guest
Matt Wolf
Interviewed Guest
Daniel Hope
Interviewed Guest
Gabriel Prokofiev
Interviewed Guest
Laura Lippmann
Interviewed Guest
David Mark
Interviewed Guest
Kate Mossman
Producer
Elaine Lester

Brand

Front Row

Front Row

Jackie, The Transports, TS Eliot Prize, 'Yellowface' row

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Natalie Portman as Jackie, TS Eliot Prize and should non-Asian actors play Asian roles?

Sarah Crompton reviews Natalie Portman as Jackie Kennedy, a new production of The Transports, the winner of the TS Eliot Prize, and should non-Asian actors play Asian roles?

Following the casting of Tilda Swinton as a character originally identified as Tibetan in the recent film Dr Strange, and the furore surrounding the casting of a new production of Howard Barker's play, In The Depths of Dead Love - Kumiko Mendl, Artistic Director of Yellow Earth Theatre, and Deborah Williams, Executive Director of Creative Diversity Network join Samira to discuss the issue of 'Yellowface' - the practice of non-Asian actors playing Asian roles.

Sarah Crompton reviews the film Jackie, directed by Pablo Lorrain and starring Natalie Portman as Jackie Kennedy, which focuses on the immediate aftermath of JFK's assassination in 1963.

The Transports is a ballad opera telling the true story of two convicts who fell in love in prison as they were waiting to be sent on the First Fleet to Australia. They had a child, were cruelly separated, but thanks to a kind gaoler, were eventually united. It was recorded in 1977 by giants of the folk world - June Tabor, Nic Jones, Martin Carthy, Norma Waterson. 40 years on a new generation of folk stars - Nancy Kerr, Faustus, the Young'Uns - are touring their new production. Samira meets them as they rehearse and finds The Transports has plenty to say about exile and migration today.

Britain's most prestigious award for poetry, the TS Eliot Award, is announced this evening. The prize is for the best collection of poems published in 2016, and Front Row will have the first interview with the winner.

Presenter: Samira Ahmed

Producer: Rebecca Armstrong.

Credits

Presenter
Samira Ahmed
Producer
Rebecca Armstrong

Brand

Front Row

Free Thinking

Writers and their notebooks

BBC Radio 3
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45 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:

Lawrence Norfolk, AS Byatt, Wendy Cope, Bidisha and David Mitchell on writers' notebooks.

Lawrence Norfolk talks to AS Byatt and David Mitchell about their notebooks, and Samira Ahmed chairs a discussion with Wendy Cope, Bidisha and the British Library's Rachel Foss.

As the British Library launches a website devoted to writers' notebooks and manuscripts, Discovering Literature, novelist Lawrence Norfolk takes a look at his own notebooks, and talks to AS Byatt, John Cooper Clarke and David Mitchell about theirs.

He's joined in the studio by Wendy Cope, Bidisha, and Rachel Foss of the British Library for a discussion - chaired by presenter Samira Ahmed - about notebooks, creativity, and how the digital age - which sees many novelists write straight onto a computer - might be changing literature.

The notebook can be the seed of a novel, or many novels, or it can be an act of prevarication and diversion. Thomas Hardy kept several different types of notebook, including one called 'Facts', in which he noted down local newspaper articles that caught his eye. One such story was 'Wife for Sale', which later became the novel The Mayor of Casterbridge.

Credits

Presenter
Lawrence Norfolk
Presenter
Samira Ahmed
Interviewed Guest
A.S. Byatt
Interviewed Guest
John Cooper Clarke
Interviewed Guest
David Mitchell
Interviewed Guest
Wendy Cope
Interviewed Guest
Bidisha
Interviewed Guest
Rachel Foss
Producer
Laura Thomas

Front Row

Hussein Chalayan, Citizen Khan, Egypt after the Pharaohs

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Samira Ahmed talks to fashion designer Hussein Chalayan about his radical new dance show.

Arts programme. Samira Ahmed talks to fashion designer Hussein Chalayan about his groundbreaking dance show at Sadler's Wells. Plus Citizen Khan writer and producer Anil Gupta.

Samira Ahmed talks to fashion designer Hussein Chalayan about his ground-breaking dance show at Sadler's Wells. With Artistic Director Alistair Spalding.

As TV sitcom Citizen Khan returns to our screens, Samira is joined by writer and producer Anil Gupta, who also created Goodness Gracious Me.

Mafia expert John Dickie reviews Black Souls, an acclaimed Italian crime drama from director Francesco Munzi.

And Samira explores an exhibition at the British Museum about Egyptian religion after the Pharaohs, with curator Elisabeth O'Connell.

Credits

Presenter
Samira Ahmed
Interviewed Guest
Hussein Chalayan
Interviewed Guest
Alistair Spalding
Interviewed Guest
Anil Gupta
Interviewed Guest
John Dickie
Interviewed Guest
Elisabeth O'Connell

Brand

Front Row

Front Row

Palme d'Or winner Dheepan, Diana Damrau, Noma Dumezweni, Garth Greenwell

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

A review of the Palme d'Or-winning film Dheepan plus German soprano Diana Damrau.

Palme d'Or-winning film Dheepan, German soprano Diana Damrau on Lucia di Lammermoor, Noma Dumezweni in our Shakespeare's People series, and American novelist Garth Greenwell.

Dheepan, the winner of the Palme d'Or at the 2015 Cannes Film Festival, tells the story of a former Sri Lankan Tamil fighter who flees the civil war to France with a woman and young girl he has never met. After finding work and housing in the suburbs of Pairs this fake family soon find that the violence they have run from is replaced by a new danger. Agnes Poirier reviews the film.

German soprano Diana Damrau discusses her role as Lucia di Lammermoor in a controversial and bloody new production at the Royal Opera House in London.

Noma Dumezweni, who is about to star as Hermione in Harry Potter and the Cursed Child on stage, chooses Paulina from The Winter's Tale as part of our Shakespeare's People series.

US writer Garth Greenwell's debut novel What Belongs to You is the story of a American teacher who becomes obsessed with a sex worker in Bulgaria. Garth talks to Samira about the mixture of fact and fiction in the novel, and his growing up gay in Kentucky and his advocacy of 'queer culture'.

Presenter Samira Ahmed

Producer Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Presenter
Samira Ahmed
Producer
Jerome Weatherald
Interviewed Guest
Agnes Poirier
Interviewed Guest
Diana Damrau
Interviewed Guest
Noma Dumezweni
Interviewed Guest
Garth Greenwell

Brand

Front Row

Front Row

Cinderella; 2015 Folio Prize Winner; Documentary-maker Nick Broomfield

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

The Folio Prize winner live, a review of Kenneth Branagh's Cinderella and Nick Broomfield.

The Folio Prize winner live from the ceremony, a review of Kenneth Branagh's Cinderella, and Nick Broomfield on his documentary about a serial killer, Tales of the Grim Sleeper.

Samira Ahmed talks to the winner of the 2015 Folio Prize, live from tonight's ceremony in London.

Antonia Quirke reviews Kenneth Branagh's new film Cinderella, the latest live-action retelling of a Disney classic fairytale.

Documentary-maker Nick Broomfield discusses his latest film, Tales of the Grim Sleeper. The film is about Lonnie Franklin Jr. who is believed to have killed more than 100 women, making him the most prolific serial killer in history. Broomfield returns to Franklin's neighbourhood to ask how he was allowed to get away with murder for so long and why the deaths of poor African American women were of no interest to the police investigating the case.

Artist Adam Dant, who has just been appointed official Election artist, discusses his plans to cover events in the coming six weeks.

Credits

Presenter
Samira Ahmed
Interviewed Guest
Antonia Quirke
Interviewed Guest
Nick Broomfield
Interviewed Guest
Adam Dant
Producer
Dymphna Flynn

Brand

Front Row

Front Row

Kate Winslet, Sparks, Jenny Uglow on her book about Edward Lear

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Kate Winslet interview, Sparks with a new album, Jenny Uglow on her book about Edward Lear

Kate Winslet on her new film, The Mountain Between Us, and her career; Sparks on new album, Hippopotamus, their first for 10 years; and Jenny Uglow on her biography of Edward Lear.

Kate Winslet's latest film, The Mountain Between Us, is an epic romance shot at 10,000 feet above sea level and at -38 degrees Celsius. The actress talks to

Samira about working with co-star Idris Elba, the legacy of Titanic, and looks forward to making her next film, when she will be working with Woody Allen.

Californian brothers Ron and Russell Mael formed the band Sparks in the early '70s, and their first hit This Town Ain't Big Enough for the Both of Us made them household names in the UK. 23 albums and more than four decades later, the brothers discuss their new album, Hippopotamus, and look back at their early days living in London at the time of power cuts and the three-day week.

Edward Lear is the writer of some of our most loved poetry. The Owl and the Pussycat has been voted the UK's favourite poem many times. Jenny Uglow's new biography, Mr Lear: A Life of Art and Nonsense, explores the life behind the rhymes and reveals a natural history painter, a landscape artist, and only later a somewhat reluctant nonsense poet. A contemporary of Lewis Carroll and a friend to Tennyson and the Pre-Raphaelite brotherhood, should we see him as a product of his time or a romantic rebel?

Presenter: Samira Ahmed

Producer: Julian May.

Credits

Presenter
Samira Ahmed
Interviewed Guest
Kate Winslet
Interviewed Guest
Ron Mael
Interviewed Guest
Russell Mael
Interviewed Guest
Jenny Uglow
Producer
Julian May

Brand

Front Row

Front Row

Jim Dale, Will Young, Man Booker International Prize

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Carry On star Jim Dale, Will Young and the winner of the Man Booker International Prize.

Singer-songwriter Will Young, Jim Dale on his autobiographical stage show, and Hungarian author Laszlo Krasznahorkai, the winner of this year's Man Booker International Prize.

Jim Dale, best known for starring in the Carry On films, is returning to the stage in a one man show, Just Jim Dale, which explores his sixty years in show business. Back in his home town of Corby, Jim Dale discusses the legacy of the Carry On films, his gift for impersonation and why he hated being a famous pop star.

Singer songwriter Will Young came to prominence after winning the first series of Pop Idol in 2002. As he releases a new album, 85% Proof, Will Young discuses confronting his past and how the trauma of being bullied by a teacher at school inspired a song on the album.

The Hungarian writer László Krasznahorkai has won the International Man Booker Prize 2015. The judges praised him for his 'sentences of incredible length that go to incredible lengths'. He talks to Samira about his demanding novels which explore dystopian and melancholic themes.

And, as music streaming site Spotify announces it is moving into video, the BBC's technology correspondent Rory Cellan-Jones discusses what the changes might mean for musicians, labels and Spotify's users.

Credits

Presenter
Samira Ahmed
Interviewed Guest
Jim Dale
Interviewed Guest
Will Young
Interviewed Guest
Laszlo Krasznahorkai
Interviewed Guest
Rory Cellan-Jones
Producer
Olivia Skinner

Brand

Front Row

Front Row

Tarell Alvin McCraney's Queer Icon; Romola Garai and Helen Edmundson on Queen Anne; Jamaica's Poet Laureate Lorna Goodison

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Oscar-winning writer Tarell Alvin McCraney; Helen Edmundson on the overlooked Queen Anne.

Oscar-winning writer Tarell Alvin McCraney on Paris is Burning; Romola Garai and Helen Edmundson on the often overlooked Queen Anne.

The Royal Shakespeare Company production of Queen Anne has opened at London's Theatre Royal Haymarket. Set in the early 18th century, the play charts the intimate and increasingly fraught relationship between the childless and insecure queen and her closest confidante Sarah Churchill, Duchess of Marlborough. Romola Garai who plays Sarah Churchill and writer Helen Edmundson discuss this often overlooked British monarch.

For our Queer Icons series, the Oscar-winning writer of Moonlight, Tarell Alvin McCraney, champions the film Paris is Burning, about drag houses, drag balls and fabulousness in 1980s New York. Queer Icons is Front Row's celebration of LGBTQ culture, to mark the 50th anniversary of the partial decriminalisation of homosexuality.

The philanthropist Lloyd Dorfman today announced a major donation to the Royal Academy of Arts in London with a view to transforming the future of architecture at the institution. Architecture critic Hugh Pearman assess the significance of his contribution.

The outgoing Poet Laureate of Jamaica, Mervyn Morris, was on Front Row recently. Today Samira meets his successor, Lorna Goodison, the first female to hold that post. She explains her role as 'praise-singer to the nation'. Her Collected Poems has just been published and from this monumental book she reads work that expresses her admiration for the Jamaican people, their language and her love of the landscape of the island.

Presenter: Samira Ahmed

Producer: Edwina Pitman.

Credits

Presenter
Samira Ahmed
Interviewed Guest
Romola Garai
Interviewed Guest
Helen Edmundson
Interviewed Guest
Tarell Alvin McCraney
Interviewed Guest
Hugh Pearman
Interviewed Guest
Lorna Goodison
Producer
Edwina Pitman

Brand

Front Row

Front Row

The Proclaimers, Gulliver's Travels, Internet as inspiration

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

The Proclaimers perform live, Gulliver's Travels, Artistic inspiration from the Internet.

The Proclaimers perform live and discuss their new album Angry Cyclist, rewriting Gulliver's Travels for the 21st century, and drawing artistic inspiration from the Internet.

Craig and Charlie Reid, better known as The Proclaimers, are live in the Front Row studio playing the title track of their new album Angry Cyclist. They discuss passing the 30 year landmark as professional musicians, seeing their music inspire a theatre production and a film, and why the idea of an angry cyclist seemed for them the perfect way of capturing the current political mood.

Two new productions inspired by Gulliver's Travels open this month in Bolton and Edinburgh. Their respective directors - Elizabeth Newman and Dan Coleman - discuss the appeal of Jonathan Swift's classic novel, and how their respective versions celebrate and challenge different aspects of this 18th century story.

Continuing Front Row's Inspire season, Drew Hemment, artist and founder of the FutureEverything Festival, and Lesley Taker, Exhibitions Manager at FACT - the Foundation for Art and Creative Technology, discuss how the internet has inspired artists.

Presenter: Samira Ahmed

Producer: Ekene Akalawu.

Credits

Presenter
Samira Ahmed
Interviewed Guest
Craig Reid
Interviewed Guest
Charlie Reid
Interviewed Guest
Elizabeth Newman
Interviewed Guest
Dan Coleman
Interviewed Guest
Drew Hemment
Interviewed Guest
Lesley Taker
Performer
The Proclaimers
Producer
Ekene Akalawu

Brand

Front Row

Front Row

National Gallery Soundscapes, Caine Prize winner, Agent Carter

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Samira Ahmed hears about the new Soundscapes exhibition at the National Gallery.

Arts news with Samira Ahmed. Including the National Gallery Soundscapes, the Caine Prize for African Writing winner, a review of Agent Carter and playwright Rebecca Lenkiewicz.

Soundscapes, a new exhibition at the National Gallery in London, presents six new music and sound installations the Gallery has commissioned to accompany individual works of art from its permanent collection. Samira Ahmed hears from contributing artists Nico Muhly, Susan Philipsz and George Miller.

The Zambian writer Namwali Serpell has just been announced as the 2015 winner of The Caine Prize for African Writing. She talks about her winning story The Sack.

Naomi Alderman reviews Marvel's Agent Carter, a TV spin-off of Marvel's Captain America starring Hayley Atwell.

Plus playwright Rebecca Lenkiewicz speaks to Samira about The Invisible, her new play examining the human impact of cuts to the legal aid system.

Presenter : Samira Ahmed

Producer : Dymphna Flynn.

Credits

Presenter
Samira Ahmed
Interviewed Guest
Susan Philipsz
Interviewed Guest
Nico Muhly
Interviewed Guest
George Miller
Interviewed Guest
Naomi Alderman
Interviewed Guest
Rebecca Lenkiewicz
Interviewed Guest
Namwali Serpell
Producer
Dymphna Flynn

Brand

Front Row

Night Waves

Big Business, Art and the Middle East, Nebraska

BBC Radio 3
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45 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:

Samira Ahmed discusses big business. Plus art and the Middle East and the film Nebraska.

Presented by Samira Ahmed. With a debate asking 'has big business become a dirty word?', discussing art and the Middle East and a review of Alexander Payne's new film Nebraska.

Acclaimed children's author Meg Rosoff joins Samira Ahmed to discuss one of the most eagerly awaited films of the year - Alexander Payne's Nebraska. It's a new twist on the American road movie which focuses on the relationship between a son and his elderly father and features a performance by Bruce Dern that won him the best actor's prize at Cannes this year.

Samira will also be discussing art and the Middle East with the British Museum's Venetia Porter, the critic Godfrey Barker, and Saudi Arabia's best known artist, Abdulnasser Gharem.

And has "business become a dirty word?" Stefan Stern of the Cass Business School and Linda Yueh, the Chief Business correspondent for BBC News, look at whether business has separated itself from society and lost the confidence of its customers.

Producer: Zahid Warley.

Credits

Presenter
Samira Ahmed
Producer
Zahid Warley
Interviewed Guest
Meg Rosoff
Interviewed Guest
Venetia Porter
Interviewed Guest
Godfrey Barker
Interviewed Guest
Abdulnasser Gharem
Interviewed Guest
Stefan Stern
Interviewed Guest
Linda Yueh

Brand

Night Waves

Front Row

Clive James, Effie Gray, Selfie, Niven Govinden

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Arts news, including Clive James on poetry and Emma Thompson in Effie Gray.

Clive James on the beauty of poetry, Emma Thompson and Dakota Fanning in new film Effie Gray, Brad Birch on the play Selfie, and Niven Govinden on his novel All the Days and Nights.

Clive James talks to Samira Ahmed about his new publication Poetry Notebook 2006-2014, in which he presents a distillation of all he's learned about the art form that matters to him most; Sarah Dunant reviews Emma Thompson and Dakota Fanning in new film Effie Gray about the life of the Victorian art critic and painter John Ruskin; playwright Brad Birch on his new production, Selfie, an update on Oscar Wilde's The Picture of Dorian Gray; and Niven Govinden on his novel All the Days and Nights

Producer Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Presenter
Samira Ahmed
Interviewed Guest
Clive James
Interviewed Guest
Sarah Dunant
Interviewed Guest
Brad Birch
Interviewed Guest
Niven Govinden
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

Brand

Front Row

Front Row

Phyllida Lloyd, The Sensory War, Robert Wilson, Super Thursday

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Phyllida Lloyd talks to Samira Ahmed about her all-female Henry IV.

Phyllida Lloyd talks to Samira Ahmed about her all-female Henry IV, The Sensory War exhibition is reviewed, and war artist Robert Wilson discusses his photography from Afghanistan.

Phyllida Lloyd talks to Samira Ahmed about her all-female Henry IV and the importance of casting women in plays about political power. Professor Griselda Pollock reviews The Sensory War, a new exhibition in Manchester which reflects on how artists have tried to capture the impact of military conflict between 1914 and 2014. Photographer and official war artist Robert Wilson discusses Helmand Return, a new series of 59 billboards across the UK of his photos which capture the daily life of British troops in Afghanistan in their final tour of duty. And tomorrow is Super Thursday, the day when more than 300 books will be published on the same day. We ask why this has evolved, and what it means for the books market.

Presenter: Samira Ahmed

Producer: Rebecca Armstrong.

Credits

Presenter
Samira Ahmed
Interviewed Guest
Phyllida Lloyd
Interviewed Guest
Griselda Pollock
Interviewed Guest
Robert Wilson
Interviewed Guest
Tim Walker
Interviewed Guest
Lisa Milton
Interviewed Guest
John Mullan
Producer
Rebecca Armstrong

Brand

Front Row

Front Row

Barbara Hepworth, Scientology, Nell Zink, Carnegie Medals

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Samira Ahmed visits the major new Barbara Hepworth exhibition at Tate Britain.

Samira Ahmed visits the new Barbara Hepworth show. She also talks to novelist Nell Zink and the winners of the awards that children's authors and illustrators really want to win.

Samira Ahmed visits the major new Barbara Hepworth exhibition that features some of her most significant sculptures in wood, stone and bronze, alongside rarely seen textiles, photographs, collages and film. Samira talks to its curator, Penelope Curtis, whose last last show as director of Tate Britain this is.

The CILIP Carnegie and Kate Greenaway Medals are the awards that authors and illustrators say they 'most want to win'. Both are awarded by children's librarians for an outstanding books for young people: one for the story the other for the illustrations. We speak to this year's winners, Tanya Landman and William Grill, both of whose books take historical subject matter, Shackleton's expedition to the Antarctic and the American South immediately after the Civil War.

Going Clear is a new film about scientology by documentary director Alex Gibney. It is based on Lawrence Wright's book by the same name and Gibney speaks with former leaders and defectors of the church. Tim Robey reviews.

Nell Zink used to write just for herself, sometimes sending her stories to a pen-pal, until she entered into a chance correspondence with Jonathan Franzen who encouraged her to publish her fiction. Her first book, The Wallcreeper, was named one of the100 notable books of 2014 by The New York Times. She talks to Samira about her second novel, Mislaid, which explores race and identity in rural Virginia.

Credits

Presenter
Samira Ahmed
Interviewed Guest
Penelope Curtis
Interviewed Guest
Tanya Landman
Interviewed Guest
William Grill
Interviewed Guest
Tim Robey
Interviewed Guest
Nell Zink

Brand

Front Row

Front Row

Marigold Hotel Director John Madden, The Museum of the Mind, Kwabs, Maidan

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Director John Madden, singer-songwriter Kwabs and Bethlem Museum of the Mind.

The Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel director John Madden, a look at the new Bethlem Museum of the Mind, Ukraine documentary Maidan and singer-songwriter Kwabs. With Samira Ahmed.

John Madden, director of The Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel, discusses making a sequel with the all-star cast including Judi Dench, Bill Nighy, Richard Gere, Maggie Smith and Dev Patel, and the power of older cinema audiences.

Curator Victoria Northwood and Psychiatrist Dr David O'Flynn on the re-opening of the Museum of the Mind at the Royal Bethlem Hospital. The museum explores the history of the hospital, which was known in the past as 'Bedlam' and was featured in Hogarth's Rake's Progress, and the relationship between art and mental health.

Maidan, a documentary filmed in Kiev during the anti-government protests in Ukraine, chronicles the unfolding events, filming the crowd as the situation deteriorates. Writer and former Eastern Europe correspondent Matt Potter reviews.

Ahead of next Monday's Front Row Debate 'Does the State owe the artist a living?', up and coming singer-songwriter Kwabs explains how an inspiring teacher at school led to his interest in music.

Presenter: Samira Ahmed

Producer: Olivia Skinner.

Credits

Presenter
Samira Ahmed
Interviewed Guest
John Madden
Interviewed Guest
Victoria Northwood
Interviewed Guest
David O'Flynn
Interviewed Guest
Matt Potter
Interviewed Guest
undefined Kwabs
Producer
Olivia Skinner

Brand

Front Row

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