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Andrew Marr's History of Modern Britain

Episode 1: Advance Britannia

Andrew Marr revisits Britain in 1945 and finds the country victorious but nearly bankrupt.

Andrew Marr revisits Britain in 1945 and finds the country victorious but nearly bankrupt, beginning a battle against the odds to retain its world power status.

Andrew Marr revisits Britain in 1945 and finds the country victorious, but badly beaten up and nearly bankrupt. With astonishing archive and telling anecdote, he tells the story of Britain's extraordinary struggle for national and cultural survival in the post-war world.

As the newly elected Labour government sets out to build 'New Jerusalem', Britain is forced to hold out the begging bowl in Washington. Back in Britain, Ealing Studios attempts to hold back the tide of Hollywood with a series of very British comedies.

There is a spirit of hope and optimism in the air, but the shortage of consumer goods and the British people's growing impatience with austerity threaten to take the country from bankruptcy to self-destruction.

A stirring story of Britain's battle against the odds to retain its world power status.

Credits

Presenter
Andrew Marr
Producer
Chris Granlund
Producer
Tom Giles
Director
Tom Giles

As the 1960s progress, Britain looks to modern technology and a fairer, liberated future.

Presented by Andrew Marr. As the 1960s progress, Harold Wilson takes centre stage in a rapidly changing Britain as the country looks to a fairer, liberated future.

Andrew Marr examines the age of Harold Wilson's classless society; a country excited by new technology, modern architecture and the scary futurism of Doctor Who. Wilson attempted to connect with the 60s spirit of progress by conjuring up the image of a future driven by science and the white heat of technology. But while the swinging sixties unleashed dreams of a fairer, liberated future, the Wilson governments presided over years of industrial conflict, stagnation and decline.

By the 1970s, as the sixties dream turned sour, industrial malaise, class and generational conflict, Vietnam, racial unrest, government paranoia and the shadow of the Soviet threat all added up to a sense of national crisis, and there were serious fears for the future of democracy in Britain. Under Edward Heath, British industry was reduced to working a three-day week, and homes were lit by candlelight during an enforced rationing of electricity. As Heath raised the question 'Who governs Britain?', the people's response came: 'Not you, mate!'.

Credits

Presenter
Andrew Marr
Producer
Chris Granlund
Producer
Francis Whately
Director
Francis Whately

Start the Week

Michael Gove on teaching history

Andrew Marr discusses the teaching of history with the Education Minister Michael Gove.

Andrew Marr talks to the education minister Michael Gove and historians Margaret MacMillan and Tom Holland.

Andrew Marr discusses the teaching of history with the Government's Education Secretary Michael Gove. The new history curriculum for schools has been hotly contested and the Minister explains his views on whether facts and dates trump historical analysis. He's joined by Margaret MacMillan who will present a real-time countdown to the outbreak of WWI in the coming year, the academic and tv historian Simon Schama, and Tom Holland who has recently translated Herodotus, considered to be 'the Father of History'.

Producer: Katy Hickman.

Credits

Presenter
Andrew Marr
Interviewed Guest
Michael Gove
Interviewed Guest
Margaret MacMillan
Interviewed Guest
Tom Holland
Producer
Katy Hickman

Start the Week

Clive James

Andrew Marr talks to writer and former television presenter Clive James.

In a special programme Andrew Marr looks back over the long career of Clive James. Even at the height of his fame as the star of weekend television, Clive James was always writing: poetry, essays and a series of memoirs. Now in his 70s and suffering from serious illness, he has been nominated for an award for his translation of Dante's The Divine Comedy. James explains how this last phase of his life has brought him a new seriousness; 'a late sublime'.

Producer: Katy Hickman.

Credits

Producer
Katy Hickman
Presenter
Andrew Marr

With Dominic Raab, Nicola Sturgeon, Rachel Reeves, Isabella Lovin and Brian Cox.

Andrew Marr is joined by Dominic Raab MP, Nicola Sturgeon MSP, Rachel Reeves MP, Isabella Lovin, Andreas Michaelis, Professor Christophe Fraser and Professor Brian Cox.

Andrew Marr is joined by Dominic Raab MP, first secretary of state, Nicola Sturgeon MSP, first minister of Scotland, Rachel Reeves MP, shadow chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster, Isabella Lovin, Swedish deputy prime ministe, Andreas Michaelis, German Foreign Office secretary, Professor Christophe Fraser, Oxford University, advising on the NHSX app and Professor Brian Cox, physicist.

News review with Camilla Tominey, associate editor, The Telegraph and Hugh Pym, BBC health editor.

Credits

Presenter
Andrew Marr
Interviewed Guest
Dominic Raab
Interviewed Guest
Nicola Sturgeon
Interviewed Guest
Rachel Reeves
Interviewed Guest
Isabella Lovin
Interviewed Guest
Andreas Michaelis
Interviewed Guest
Christophe Fraser
Interviewed Guest
Brian Cox
Panellist
Camilla Tominey
Panellist
Hugh Pym

Andrew is joined by Anneliese Dodds MP, Arlene Foster MLA and professor Peter Openshaw.

Andrew Marr is joined by Anneliese Dodds MP, shadow chancellor; Arlene Foster MLA, first minister of Northern Ireland and government scientific adviser professor Peter Openshaw of Imperial College.

Andrew Marr is joined by Anneliese Dodds MP, shadow chancellor; Arlene Foster MLA, first minister of Northern Ireland and government scientific adviser professor Peter Openshaw of Imperial College.

The newpapers are reviewed by Telegraph associate editor Camilla Tominey and BBC health editor Hugh Pym.

Credits

Presenter
Andrew Marr
Interviewed Guest
Anneliese Dodds
Interviewed Guest
Arlene Foster
Interviewed Guest
Peter Openshaw
Participant
Camilla Tominey
Participant
Hugh Pym

Andrew Marr is joined by Ed Miliband MP, Ben Carson, Sir Jeremy Farrar and Joanna Lumley.

Andrew Marr is joined by Ed Miliband MP, United States housing secretary Ben Carson, professor Sir Jeremy Farrar and actor Joanna Lumley.

Andrew Marr is joined by Ed Miliband MP, shadow business secretary; Ben Carson, United States housing secretary and former presidential candidate; professor Sir Jeremy Farrar, director of the Wellcome Trust; and actor Joanna Lumley.

The newspapers are reviewed by deputy political editor of the Sunday Times Caroline Wheeler and BBC health editor Hugh Pym.

Credits

Presenter
Andrew Marr
Interviewed Guest
Ed Miliband
Interviewed Guest
Ben Carson
Interviewed Guest
Jeremy Farrar
Interviewed Guest
Joanna Lumley
Participant
Caroline Wheeler
Participant
Hugh Pym

On Easter Sunday, Andrew is joined by the archbishop of Canterbury.

On Easter Sunday, Andrew is joined by the archbishop of Canterbury, Alok Sharma MP, Lisa Nandy MP and Jeremy Farrar of the Wellcome Trust.

On Easter Sunday, Andrew Marr is joined by the archbishop of Canterbury, and interviews Business Secretary Alok Sharma MP, Shadow Foreign Secretary Lisa Nandy MP and Jeremy Farrar, director of the Wellcome Trust. BBC chief political correspondent Vicki Young and Jane Moore of The Sun review the newspapers.

Credits

Presenter
Andrew Marr
Interviewed Guest
Justin Welby
Interviewed Guest
Alok Sharma
Interviewed Guest
Lisa Nandy
Interviewed Guest
Jeremy Farrar

Labour leader Sir Keir Starmer and health secretary Matt Hancock discuss the coronavirus.

Labour leader Sir Keir Starmer, health secretary Matt Hancock and professor Neil Ferguson from Imperial College London discuss the coronavirus crisis with Andrew Marr.

Sir Keir Starmer, the newly-elected leader of Labour, and the health secretary Matt Hancock join Andrew Marr to discuss the latest developments in the coronavirus crisis.

Also on the programme, Neil Ferguson, a professor at Imperial College London, whose warnings led to the current lockdown, and Alex van Trotsenburg, managing director of operations for the World Bank.

Gary Lineker discusses the future of football and the frustration of life indoors for sports people of all kinds.

And reviewing the newspapers, the editor of the Daily Mirror, Alison Phillips, and the BBC's health editor, Hugh Pym.

Credits

Presenter
Andrew Marr
Interviewed Guest
Keir Starmer
Interviewed Guest
Matt Hancock

Andrew Marr is joined by Matt Hancock, Lisa Nandy, Rick Scott and David Olusoga.

Andrew Marr is joined by Matt Hancock, Lisa Nandy, Rick Scott, David Olusoga and Sam Mendes. The newspapers are reviewed by Anushka Asthana and Clive Myrie.

Andrew Marr is joined by health secretary Matt Hancock, shadow foreign secretary Lisa Nandy, US senator Rick Scott, historian and broadcaster David Olusoga and film director Sam Mendes. The newspapers are reviewed by Anushka Asthana and Clive Myrie.

Credits

Presenter
Andrew Marr
Interviewed Guest
Matt Hancock
Interviewed Guest
Lisa Nandy
Interviewed Guest
Rick Scott
Interviewed Guest
David Olusoga
Interviewed Guest
Sam Mendes
Panellist
Anushka Asthana
Panellist
Clive Myrie

Start the Week

Art and Civilisations

Andrew Marr with Mary Beard, Simon Schama, David Olusoga and Tacita Dean.

Andrew Marr on art and civilisation with Mary Beard, Simon Schama, Tacita Dean and David Olusoga.

What is art - and why do we need it?

Fifty years ago the landmark BBC Two series Civilisation set out to answer this question. Now historians Mary Beard, Simon Schama and David Olusoga take on this challenge of defining human civilisation through art, in a bold update renamed Civilisations. Mary Beard tells Andrew Marr how humans have chosen to depict themselves, from enormous pre-historic heads in Mexico to lustful paintings meant for male eyes. She unpicks the bloody battle between religion and art, and declares that "one man's art is another's barbarity".

But should art make us recoil? Simon Schama explores our urge to destroy the images we dislike, and finds that hatred and destruction have followed art through the centuries.

This clash of religions and cultures has enriched art, argues David Olusoga. He sees culture on the frontline as empires expanded and a battle took place to define what art could be.

This spring the artist Tacita Dean offers her own account of art's value and meaning as she unveils three exhibitions at once: exploring landscapes at the Royal Academy, portraits at the National Portrait Gallery and still life at the National Gallery. Moving between film and painted images, she challenges our idea of what art looks like.

Producer: Hannah Sander.

Credits

Presenter
Andrew Marr
Interviewed Guest
Mary Beard
Interviewed Guest
Simon Schama
Interviewed Guest
Tacita Dean
Interviewed Guest
David Olusoga
Producer
Hannah Sander

Start the Week

Fascism and the Enlightenment with Steven Pinker

Steven Pinker, Rob Riemen and Tali Sharot discuss fascism and humanism with Andrew Marr.

Humanity is flourishing and the Enlightenment has worked, declares Steven Pinker. The Harvard psychologist has looked across health, prosperity, safety, peace and happiness, and sees signs that all are improving. He tells Andrew Marr how Enlightenment attitudes to reason and science have made this the best age in which to live. But Enlightenment values are under attack and Pinker calls for their vigorous defence.

Dutch philosopher Rob Riemen also sees humanism under threat from fascism, with its politics of resentment and hatred of the life of the mind. But can reason, beauty and justice combat this threat?

The neuroscientist Tali Sharot thinks reason and fear are not enough to make us change our minds. Only by understanding how the brain functions can we perfect the art of persuasion.

Producer: Hannah Sander.

Credits

Presenter
Andrew Marr
Interviewed Guest
Steven Pinker
Interviewed Guest
Rob Riemen
Interviewed Guest
Tali Sharot
Producer
Hannah Sander

Start the Week

Les Misérables: novel of the century?

Andrew Marr with David Bellos, Dinah Birch, Simon Callow and Barbara Hannigan.

Cultural discussion programme. Andrew Marr discusses the 19th-century novel with David Bellos, Dinah Birch, Simon Callow and Barbara Hannigan.

On Start the Week Andrew Marr talks to David Bellos about Victor Hugo's Les Misérables. Bellos argues that this 19th century masterpiece is the novel of the century, which demonstrates the drive to improve human life both morally and materially. Dinah Birch compares what was happening in literature on the other side of the channel, reflecting the breadth of society in Britain. Simon Callow makes the case for the composer of the century, Richard Wagner, while the singer Barbara Hannigan explains how a 12th century legend has been given a contemporary twist in the opera Written On Skin.

Producer: Katy Hickman.

Credits

Presenter
Andrew Marr
Interviewed Guest
David Bellos
Interviewed Guest
Dinah Birch
Interviewed Guest
Simon Callow
Interviewed Guest
Barbara Hannigan
Producer
Katy Hickman

Start the Week

The Power of Art

Andrew Marr with Andrew Graham-Dixon, Leanda de Lisle, Kelly Chorpening and Don Thompson.

Cultural discussion programme. Andrew Marr explores the power of art with Andrew Graham-Dixon, Leanda de Lisle, Kelly Chorpening and Don Thompson.

Art was power for Britain's kings and queens. In a new BBC TV series, Andrew Graham-Dixon visits the paintings amassed by King Charles I, the first great royal collector in British history. He tells Andrew Marr why after Charles was executed his royal artworks were flogged across Europe. The lost royal collection will finally be reunited this year in an exhibition at the Royal Academy of Arts. Historian Leanda de Lisle brings the Stuart monarch back to life in her biography White King. But was the art-loving king a traitor, a murderer or a martyr? And it is not only kings who use art to impress. Don Thompson meets hedge fund managers and foreign oligarchs in his study of the contemporary art scene, while artist Kelly Chorpening describes the role of Camberwell College of Art in shaping the art scene.

Producer: Hannah Sander

Picture credit:

Anthony van Dyck (1599-1641), Charles I in Three Positions, 1635-36

Royal Collection Trust / (c) Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2018, www.royalcollection.org.uk.

Credits

Presenter
Andrew Marr
Interviewed Guest
Andrew Graham-Dixon
Interviewed Guest
Leanda de Lisle
Interviewed Guest
Kelly Chorpening
Interviewed Guest
Don Thompson
Producer
Hannah Sander

Woman's Hour

Nightclub racism, Andrew Marr on poetry, Lee Miller WWII photos, Children and sexuality

Andrew Marr, Helen Mort and Ruth Padel discuss women's poetry.

Andrew Marr, Helen Mort and Ruth Padel discuss women's poetry. Are nightclub door policies racist? World War Two photos by Lee Miller. And talking to children about sexuality.

Racism and Nightclub Door Policies - Clubber Zalika Miller who claims that she and her friends were turned away from a London club because of their skin colour and weight and Reni Eddo-Lodge, a journalist who specialises in gender and race relations discuss nightclub entrance practices.

On National Poetry Day, Andrew Marr examines the work of women poets Edna St Vincent Millay, Claudia Rankine and Margaret Cavendish with British poets Helen Mort and Ruth Padel.

To discuss when children become aware of their own sexuality and how we should talk to them about it, Jenni is joined by Mel Gadd, Projects Co-ordinator at the Family Planning Association, and Polly Shute, Fundraising Director for London LGBT Pride.

As never-before-seen photos by Lee Miller are displayed in a new exhibition at The Imperial War Museum, curator Hilary Roberts and Miller's son Tony Penrose talk about the World War 2 photographer's vision of gender.

Presenter: Jenni Murray

Producer: Rebecca Myatt.

Credits

Presenter
Jenni Murray
Producer
Alice Feinstein
Producer
Rebecca Myatt
Interviewed Guest
Zalika Miller
Interviewed Guest
Reni Eddo-Lodge
Interviewed Guest
Andrew Marr
Interviewed Guest
Helen Mort
Interviewed Guest
Ruth Padel
Interviewed Guest
Hilary Roberts
Interviewed Guest
Antony Penrose
Interviewed Guest
Polly Shute
Interviewed Guest
Melanie Gadd

Genre

Brand

Woman's Hour

Start the Week

France Special

Andrew Marr with Agnes Desarthe, Karim Miske, Anne-Elisabeth Moutet and Robert Gildea.

Andrew Marr discusses France with novelists Agnes Desarthe and Karim Miske, commentator Anne-Elisabeth Moutet and historian Robert Gildea, talking hours before the Paris attacks.

Andrew Marr was in Paris on Friday to record a special edition of Start the Week about France. Hours later the Paris attacks happened. This programme is not about these attacks or Islamic State or the French role in the war in Syria, but it is a conversation about the political, cultural and religious fault lines in France from the 19th century to today.

As BBC Radio 4 plans to broadcast a retelling of Emile Zola's 20 novel cycle, Les Rougon-Macquart, the journalist Anne-Elisabeth Moutet explores whether Zola is a 19th century gateway into understanding modern France. The novelist Agnès Desarthe has set her latest novel at the beginning of the 20th century and mixes the intimate with the great events of French history. The French Resistance is one of France's heroic myths and is central to the country's identity, but the historian Robert Gildea says the reality is far more complex. And contemporary France in all its complexity is represented in Karim Miské's thriller set among the radical Islamic preachers, Christian fundamentalists and corrupt police officers in one of the poorest suburbs of Paris.

Producer: Katy Hickman.

Credits

Presenter
Andrew Marr
Interviewed Guest
Agnes Desarthe
Interviewed Guest
Karim Miske
Interviewed Guest
Anne-Elisabeth Moutet
Interviewed Guest
Robert Gildea
Producer
Katy Hickman

Start the Week

Mysteries of the Universe

Carlo Rovelli, Carole Mundell, Helen Scales and Laura Walker with Andrew Marr.

Andrew Marr explores space, time and the ocean with Carlo Rovelli, Carole Mundell, Helen Scales and Laura Walker.

The Italian physicist Carlo Rovelli delves into the meaning of time. He tells Andrew Marr how we live in a timeless world but have evolved to perceive time's flow.

The astrophysicist Carole Mundell is interested in the extragalactic. Her studies of the universe beyond our Milky Way help expand knowledge of cosmic black holes and explain powerful explosions in space.

Space travel is the new frontier, but exactly 250 years ago the Endeavour set sail from Plymouth seeking to test the limits of scientific understanding. An exhibition at the British Library, curated by Laura Walker, tells the story of Captain Cook's world-changing voyages and their studies into the skies, seas and lands beyond our shores.

And the marine biologist Helen Scales is more interested in exploring the world beneath the oceans. Her latest book marvels at the wonders of fish, from centuries-old giants to tiny restless travellers moving in shoals across our globe.

Producer: Katy Hickman.

Credits

Presenter
Andrew Marr
Interviewed Guest
Carlo Rovelli
Interviewed Guest
Carole Mundell
Interviewed Guest
Helen Scales
Interviewed Guest
Laura Walker
Producer
Katy Hickman

Start the Week

Love and Loss

Andrew Marr with Sue Black, Kit de Waal, Mark-Anthony Turnage and Jack Hartnell.

Sue Black spends much of her time with dead bodies. As one of the world's leading forensic anthropologists she has encountered death in many forms, leading British expeditions to Kosovo and to Thailand following the Boxing Day Tsunami. She tells Andrew Marr what ancient cadavers and recent corpses can teach us about mortality.

Medieval depictions of death and injury don't shy away from the grotesque, says art historian Jack Hartnell. The mutilated bodies of saints and martyrs were often on display in medieval buildings, but these blood-spattered images were meant to inspire hope and faith.

A devastating loss divides a couple in award-winning novelist Kit de Waal's new book, The Trick to Time. As an expert in fostering and adoption, she has also helped both adults and children cope with the lifelong impact of tragedy.

A courageous child sits at the heart of composer Mark-Anthony Turnage's latest opera, Coraline, a dark fantasy based on Neil Gaiman's tale. The heroic Coraline finds a magical world in her attic and steps inside. But this world's Other Mother is not to be trusted and Coraline must fight to restore her real family.

Producer: Hannah Sander.

Credits

Presenter
Andrew Marr
Interviewed Guest
Sue Black
Interviewed Guest
Kit de Waal
Interviewed Guest
Mark-Anthony Turnage
Interviewed Guest
Jack Hartnell
Producer
Hannah Sander

Start the Week

World on the Move

Andrew Marr talks to Frank Dikotter, Sir Hew Strachan, Patience Agbabi and Tahmima Anam.

Andrew Marr explores the mass movement of people with Frank Dikotter, Sir Hew Strachan, Patience Agbabi and Tahmima Anam.

World on the Move: on Start the Week Andrew Marr explores how the mass movement of people has changed societies, in a special edition broadcast in front of an audience as part of a day of programmes on BBC Radio 4. The historian Sir Hew Strachan looks back at the largest single influx of people into Britain when 250,000 Belgians arrived during the Great War, while Frank Dikötter explores the biggest forced internal migration as tens of millions of young Chinese were sent to work in the countryside during the Cultural Revolution. The poet Patience Agbabi humanises the mass movement of people with her tale of one refugee's story. And what of those who return? The Bangladeshi author Tahmima Anam looks at what happens when you try to go back home.

Producer: Katy Hickman.

Credits

Presenter
Andrew Marr
Interviewed Guest
Frank Dikotter
Interviewed Guest
Hew Strachan
Interviewed Guest
Tahmima Anam
Producer
Katy Hickman

Start the Week

Loneliness and Inner Voices

Andrew Marr with Charles Fernyhough, Olivia Laing, Alistair McDowall and Frances Wilson.

Andrew Marr discusses the inner voice with Charles Fernyhough, Olivia Laing, Alistair McDowall and Frances Wilson.

On Start the Week Andrew Marr talks to the psychologist Charles Fernyhough about the inner speech in our heads. But what if it's a lone voice? The writer Olivia Laing explores what it's like to be lonely in a bustling city, while the playwright Alistair McDowall explores what happens when you're abandoned on a distant planet with no sense of time. The biographer Frances Wilson writes a tale of hero-worship, betrayal and revenge through the life of Thomas De Quincey, a man who modelled his opium-habit on Coleridge and his voice and writing on Wordsworth.

Producer: Katy Hickman.

Credits

Presenter
Andrew Marr
Interviewed Guest
Charles Fernyhough
Interviewed Guest
Olivia Laing
Interviewed Guest
Alistair McDowall
Interviewed Guest
Frances Wilson
Producer
Katy Hickman
Results 1 to 20 of 113

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