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Front Row

18/03/2010

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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John Wilson reports on the world's biggest art theft, still unsolved.

John Wilson reports on the largest unsolved art theft ever.

Twenty years ago to the day, two thieves entered the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston, USA, and seized art including a Vermeer, three Rembrandts and a Manet, with a total current value of about £350 million. John Wilson reports from the Museum on this audacious robbery, which remains the single greatest property theft ever. Empty frames on the gallery walls remain a sad and constant reminder of the crime.

John talks to investigators from the Museum and the FBI still on the trail of the missing art, and hears the many theories about the possible perpetrators. Novelist Tracy Chevalier, who saw the Vermeer in the Museum before it was stolen, reflects on the part this painting played in her novel Girl With A Pearl Earring, and crime writer David Hosp discusses his fictional account of the crime and its aftermath in his new novel Among Thieves.

And despite the two decades since these art works disappeared from public view, John discovers that a happy ending is not out of the question.

Credits

Presenter
John Wilson
Interviewed Guest
Tracy Chevalier
Interviewed Guest
David Hosp

Brand

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Front Row

We're the Millers; Terry Gilliam; Franz Ferdinand; Bob Dylan portraits

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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We're the Millers reviewed, Franz Ferdinand, Terry Gilliam and portraits by Bob Dylan.

With John Wilson. Including a review of Jennifer Aniston in We're the Millers, interviews with director Terry Gilliam and members of Franz Ferdinand, and portraits by Bob Dylan.

With John Wilson.

Film director and former Python Terry Gilliam discusses the re-mastering of his classic film Time Bandits, for a new DVD release, as his new film The Zero Theorem heads for the Venice Film Festival.

Jennifer Aniston stars as a stripper turned pretend suburban wife and mother in the film We're The Millers. She becomes involved in the plans of a small-time drug dealer, played by Jason Sudekis, who enlists a fake family to help him smuggle marijuana across the Mexican border. Mark Eccleston reviews.

The Scottish band Franz Ferdinand, who won the Mercury Music Prize in 2004, are back with a new album, Right Thoughts, Right Words, Right Action, their first release for four years. Alex Kapranos and Bob Hardy discuss creating a live sound on a studio album and how a line on a vintage postcard discovered in a London market led to the opening lyric of the title track.

As an exhibition of pastel portraits by Bob Dylan opens at the National Portrait Gallery in London, music journalist Kate Mossman discusses Dylan's art and the portraits in his lyrics.

Producer Ellie Bury.

Credits

Presenter
John Wilson
Interviewed Guest
Terry Gilliam
Interviewed Guest
Mark Eccleston
Interviewed Guest
Alex Kapranos
Interviewed Guest
Bob Hardy
Interviewed Guest
Kate Mossman
Producer
Ellie Bury
Editor
John Goudie

Brand

Front Row

Kaleidoscope

Nick Drake - Unsung

BBC Radio 4
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29 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:

John Wilson explores the life of singer-songwriter Nick Drake.

John Wilson explores the life and controversial death of singer-songwriter Nick Drake.

John Wilson explores the troubled life and the controversial death of singer-songwriter Nick Drake with the help of those closest to him, including his sister Gabrielle, producer Joe Boyd and his friend Robert Kirby.

Credits

Presenter
John Wilson
Interviewed Guest
Joe Boyd
Interviewed Guest
Stuart Maconie
Interviewed Guest
Robert Kirby
Interviewed Guest
Gabrielle Drake

Brand

Kaleidoscope

Front Row

Sir Paul McCartney

BBC Radio 4
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Sir Paul McCartney talks about the lyrics to some of the Beatles' most famous songs.

Sir Paul McCartney talks to John Wilson about the origins of the lyrics to some of the Beatles' most famous songs.

Sir Paul McCartney talks to John Wilson about the origins of the lyrics to some of the Beatles' most famous songs, the problems he faced when they split and how he rediscovered the terror of live performance with his group Wings.

Credits

Presenter
John Wilson
Interviewed Guest
Paul McCartney

Brand

Front Row

Front Row

Lee Evans, White House Down, Man Booker shortlist

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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John Wilson with news of the shortlist for the Man Booker Prize for fiction.

Arts news with John Wilson, including comedian Lee Evans on his return to the theatre in Essex, new film White House Down, and the shortlist for the Man Booker Prize for fiction.

With John Wilson.

Comedian Lee Evans returns to stage in Barking in Essex, the last play written by screenwriter Clive Exton (Entertaining Mr Sloane, 10 Rillington Place, Jeeves and Wooster) before his death in 2007. The play centres on a dysfunctional criminal family from Essex and co-stars Sheila Hancock and Keeley Hawes. Lee Evans discusses swearing, Samuel Beckett, and the plumber providing inspiration for his forthcoming tour.

Roland Emmerich, director of disaster movies Independence Day and The Day After Tomorrow, is about to release his latest, White House Down, in which a heavily-armed group of paramilitary invaders target the President of the United States. Kate Muir reviews.

The shortlist for the Man Booker Prize for fiction was announced today. Contenders for the £50,000 prize are Jim Crace, Colm Toibin, Eleanor Catton, Jhumpa Lahiri, NoViolet Bulawayo and Ruth Ozeki. Chair of judges Robert Macfarlane and judge Natalie Haynes discuss their selection. The winner is announced on 15 October.

Producer Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Presenter
John Wilson
Interviewed Guest
Lee Evans
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

Brand

Front Row

Front Row

Francis Bacon meets Henry Moore; Manic Street Preachers; Jason Byrne; In a World

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Arts news with John Wilson. Francis Bacon and Henry Moore paired in a new exhibition.

Francis Bacon and Henry Moore paired in a new exhibition, Nicky Wire from Manic Street Preachers, the film In a World reviewed, and comedian Jason Byrne on his new sitcom.

With John Wilson.

As a new exhibition bringing together works by Henry Moore and Francis Bacon opens at the Ashmolean in Oxford, art critic Rachel Campbell-Johnston reviews the show and discusses artistic pairings.

Manic Street Preachers' 11th studio album is out next week. Bassist and lyricist Nicky Wire reveals how Rewind the Film is a new departure for the band, as they acknowledge the passing of the years and reflect on the longevity of their musical career.

Viv Groskup reviews In a World, a quirky rom-com set in the cut-throat world of movie trailers, where a handful of voice-over artists compete to say those immortal lines - In a world.... Lake Bell wrote, directed and stars in the film, which won the Best Screenplay award at Sundance.

The comedian Jason Byrne discusses his BBC One show Father Figure, a new sitcom involving an Irish grandmother, slapstick and a studio audience, and is adapted from Byrne's series on Radio 2.

Producer Ella-mai Robey.

Credits

Presenter
John Wilson
Interviewed Guest
Nicky Wire
Interviewed Guest
Jason Byrne
Producer
Ella-mai Robey

Brand

Front Row

Front Row

Sting; Australian art at the Royal Academy

BBC Radio 4
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John Wilson reports on a major exhibition of Australian art, on show at the Royal Academy.

Sting on his new album The Last Ship and on writing a Broadway musical, the Royal Academy's show of Australian art, and the winner of Gramophone magazine's Recording of the Year.

With John Wilson.

Sting discusses The Last Ship, his latest album and the first original material he has released for nearly a decade. Based on Sting's experiences growing up in a shipbuilding community on Tyneside, The Last Ship is a narrative about the demise of the industry seen through the eyes of a range of characters. Sting talks about the autobiographical element of the songs, and how he is writing a Broadway musical about the same subject, which is due to open next year.

Australia, at the Royal Academy in London, is the first major survey of Australian art in the UK for over 50 years, and includes work by early 19th century settlers, aboriginal artists, impressionists, and 20th century painters such as Sidney Nolan. Charlotte Mullins reviews.

Front Row announces the winner of Gramophone magazine's Recording Of The Year 2013, and John talks to the winning artist.

Producer Rebecca Nicholson.

Credits

Presenter
John Wilson
Interviewed Guest
Sting undefined
Producer
Rebecca Nicholson

Brand

Front Row

Front Row

BBC Short Story Award; Jack Vettriano retrospective; poet John Cooper Clarke

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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The BBC National Short Story Award 2013 shortlist; Jack Vettriano retrospective review.

John Wilson reveals the shortlist for the BBC National Short Story Award 2013, reviews a major Jack Vettriano exhibition in Glasgow, and interviews punk poet John Cooper Clarke.

With John Wilson,

Front Row announces the shortlist for the BBC National Short Story Awards 2013. Chair of the judges Mariella Frostrup talks about the five authors nominated for the prize, the process of judging the competition and how the exceptional stories stood out. John Wilson also speaks to the first of the nominated authors about their magical and uncanny short story. Front Row will be hearing from the rest of the shortlisted authors and the five stories are broadcast next week on Radio 4.

Punk poet John Cooper Clarke tells John what he thinks of the Arctic Monkeys' version of his poem I Wanna Be Yours, which features on their number one album AM, and why he was partly responsible for the band's name.

Jack Vettriano is one of the UK's most popular artists, his paintings are well known and widely reproduced as greeting cards and posters. But, despite his commercial success, Vettriano's work has often met with a less than enthusiastic response from critics. Kelvingrove Gallery in Glasgow is holding a major retrospective of his work, which includes some of his best loved works which are normally in private collections. Art Critic Moira Jeffrey reviews.

American artist Richard Serra is renowned for his monumental steel sculptures, harking back to his childhood (his father worked in a shipyard) and to the steel mills he worked in as a young man. Drawing is also important to him: he sees it as a way of exploring new ideas and materials. He's now approaching his seventy-fifth birthday and as a new exhibition of his work opens Richard Serra discusses his career, and how art has affected his personal life, as he gives John a personal tour of the twelve drawings which were specially created for this display.

Producer Claire Bartleet.

Credits

Presenter
John Wilson
Interviewed Guest
John Cooper Clarke
Interviewed Guest
Richard Serra
Interviewed Guest
Mariella Frostrup
Producer
Claire Bartleet

Brand

Front Row

Front Row

James McAvoy in Filth; Dizzee Rascal; director Lucy Walker; young Poets Laureate

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Arts news with John Wilson, including the verdict on James McAvoy in Filth.

Arts news. John Wilson reviews the film adaptation of Irvine Welsh's novel Filth; Oscar-nominated documentary director Lucy Walker; rapper Dizzee Rascal; young Poets Laureate.

With John Wilson.

It's 17 years since Irving Welsh's novel Trainspotting became a highly-successful film, and now another of his books, Filth, makes it to the big screen. It stars James McAvoy as foul-mouthed detective sergeant Bruce Robertson, who's supposed to be investigating a murder, but combines this with large quantities of alcohol and drugs, and interfering with his colleagues' personal lives. Jason Solomons reviews.

British director Lucy Walker has been Oscar-nominated twice, for her documentaries Waste Land, and The Tsunami and the Cherry Blossom. Her new film is The Crash Reel, which tells the story of professional snowboarder Kevin Pearce, who was severely brain injured after a crash and became determined to return to the sport despite his doctor's wishes. Walker explains how she became involved in the story.

Dizzee Rascal is the British rapper whose Mercury prize-winning debut album, Boy in da Corner, propelled him to stardom in 2003. He reflects on his performance in the London Olympics opening ceremony, his move to America and collaborating with Jessie J, will.i.am and Tinie Tempah on his latest album, The Fifth.

As part of the National Poetry Day celebrations, two new Young Poets Laureate are being announced today: the 2013/2014 Young Poet Laureate for Birmingham, and the first-ever Young Poet Laureate for London. Both winners discuss their poetry, and their feelings about taking on this public role.

Producer Claire Bartleet.

Credits

Presenter
John Wilson
Interviewed Guest
Lucy Walker
Interviewed Guest
Dizzee Rascal
Producer
Claire Bartleet

Brand

Front Row

Front Row

Anoushka Shankar; TV drama Truckers; Frank Auerbach

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Anoushka Shankar on her new album, TV's Truckers reviewed and Frank Auerbach painting.

John Wilson meets sitar-player Anoushka Shankar and learns how the death of her father Ravi affected her music. Plus a rare interview with artist Frank Auerbach.

With John Wilson.

Sitar player Anoushka Shankar discusses her latest album, Traces Of You, which features vocals from her half-sister, the singer Norah Jones. The album was influenced by the death of her father, the legendary sitar player Ravi Shankar, and explores the cycle of life. Anoushka Shankar explains how the worldwide outcry following the death of a young woman who was gang raped in India, led her to reveal that she too was sexually abused as a young girl.

Truckers is the new TV drama by Made In Dagenham writer, William Ivory. Set in Nottingham, each episode tells the story of one character: starting with Stephen Tompkinson as a driver dealing with the breakdown of his marriage. The series also stars Ashley Walters (Top Boy) and Sian Breckin (Tyrannosaur). Matt Thorne reviews.

In a rare interview, artist Frank Auerbach talks in detail about his approach to his work, explaining that he goes to his studio every single day, without ever taking a day off, because he enjoys it so much. He also points out that, although he is seen as an abstract artist, he actually paints exactly what he sees in front of him...

Producer Rebecca Nicholson.

Credits

Presenter
John Wilson
Presenter
Matt Thorne
Interviewed Guest
Anoushka Shankar
Interviewed Guest
Frank Auerbach
Producer
Rebecca Nicholson

Brand

Front Row

Front Row

Paul McCartney; El Dorado; Sebastian Junger on Tim Hetherington

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Arts news. John Wilson meets Paul McCartney, who talks about his latest album, New.

Arts news with John Wilson, including an interview with Paul McCartney on his latest album, New.

With John Wilson.

Sir Paul McCartney talks about his latest album (called New), he sets the record straight regarding his relationship with John Lennon, and admits that he finds it difficult to say "I love you".

The legend of a lost city of gold in South America captivated Europeans for centuries. A new exhibition at the British Museum unravels the myth of El Dorado - it was a man, not a city, and "The Golden One" was covered in powdered gold as part of a ritual. Rachel Campbell-Johnston reviews.

War photojournalist Tim Hetherington was killed covering the Libyan conflict in 2011. He'd been Oscar-nominated earlier that year along with his co-director and friend Sebastian Junger. Now Sebastian has made a moving documentary-portrait of his colleague. He talks to John about Tim's courage, his distinctive approach to photography and the effect Tim's death has had on his work.

Producer Timothy Prosser.

Credits

Presenter
John Wilson
Interviewed Guest
Paul McCartney
Interviewed Guest
Sebastian Junger
Producer
Timothy Prosser

Brand

Front Row

Front Row

Morrissey autobiography; Clio Barnard; Glee's Cory Monteith tribute

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Arts news and reviews with John Wilson, including Philip Hoare on Morrissey's Autobiograph

Philip Hoare on Morrissey's Autobiography; film director Clio Barnard on The Selfish Giant; Glee's tribute to Cory Monteith; Nelson, Navy, Nation at the National Maritime Museum.

With John Wilson.

Following in the footsteps of Homer's Odyssey, Morrissey's Autobiography has been published as a Penguin Classic. The singer takes readers through his childhood in Manchester, The Smiths' success and subsequent court battles, insights into personal relationships - and unexpected stories, including an invitation to appear in Friends. Philip Hoare, a winner of The Samuel Johnson Prize for non-fiction, reviews.

Director Clio Barnard, who won acclaim for The Arbor, her portrait of the Bradford writer Andrea Dunbar, talks to John about her new film The Selfish Giant, loosely based on a story by Oscar Wilde, which now focuses on two boys lured into the world of scrap metal.

Nelson, Navy, Nation is a new permanent gallery at the National Maritime Museum. Opening on Trafalgar Day (21 October) it looks at how the Royal Navy shaped individual lives and the course of British history in the 18th century - a period when sea-faring heroes were national celebrities. Naval historian Dr Sam Willis reviews.

Tonight's edition of Glee is a tribute to actor Cory Monteith, who died earlier this year and who played the central role of Finn Hudson in the series. Boyd Hilton, TV editor of Heat magazine, discusses how programme-makers deal with unexpected tragedies or cast-absences in long running series.

Producer Rebecca Nicholson.

Credits

Presenter
John Wilson
Interviewed Guest
Clio Barnard
Interviewed Guest
Boyd Hilton
Interviewed Guest
Philip Hoare
Interviewed Guest
Sam Willis
Producer
Rebecca Nicholson

Brand

Front Row

Front Row

BBC National Short Story Award; Mark Lewisohn on The Beatles; The Fifth Estate

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

John Wilson reports live from the BBC National Short Story Award ceremony.

Arts news. John Wilson is at the BBC National Short Story Award ceremony to announce the winner; Mark Lewisohn on his epic biography of The Beatles; The Fifth Estate reviewed.

With John Wilson.

Front Row is live from the BBC National Short Story Award ceremony, where the chair of the judges, Mariella Frostrup, announces the winner of the £15,000 first prize, and we hear from the winning writer.

The Beatles biographer and historian Mark Lewisohn discusses the first in his trilogy of books about the band, Tune In , which ends in 1962 as they're about to release their first single Love Me Do. The work is a weighty tome, running to 960 pages, and examines their lives week by week in the run-up to global fame, with the help of letters written by the group to their fans, which have been unearthed for the first time.

The Fifth Estate is cinema's take on the story of Wikileaks, played out through the friendship and subsequent rivalry of website activists Julian Assange (Benedict Cumberbatch) and Daniel Domscheit-Berg (Daniel Bruhl). Rosie Boycott reviews.

Producer Olivia Skinner.

Credits

Presenter
John Wilson
Interviewed Guest
Mark Lewisohn
Producer
Olivia Skinner

Brand

Front Row

Front Row

David Beckham; Graham Nash; Dracula

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Arts news with John Wilson, including David Beckham on life in front of the camera.

David Beckham on being a photographic muse; singer-songwriter Graham Nash on his memoirs; Queen's Brian May on a Victorian 3D craze; a review of Jonathan Rhys Meyers' TV Dracula.

With John Wilson.

David Beckham talks about being a photographic muse - and of what's it's been like, living his life in front of a camera-lens.

Singer-songwriter Graham Nash found fame with The Hollies and then with Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young. He's just published his memoirs and reflects on his upbringing in Salford and how his childhood was affected by his father's prison sentence. He also describes the unique harmonies created through his friendship with David Crosby and Stephen Stills - and his thorny relationship with Neil Young.

Guitarist Brian May, founder member of Queen, also has a life-long passion for Diableries, 19th century French cards with 3D views of the underworld printed on them. He and fellow-enthusiast Denis Pellerin explain how these gothic images became hugely popular, and how Brian developed a modern day stereoscope in order to view them.

A new dramatisation of Dracula arrives on TV for Halloween, starring Jonathan Rhys Meyers. This version sees the count posing as an American industrialist who arrives in England claiming he wants to bring modern science to Victorian society. In reality, he hopes to wreak revenge on the people who ruined his life, centuries earlier. Antonia Quirke reviews.

Producer Rebecca Nicholson.

Credits

Presenter
John Wilson
Interviewed Guest
David Beckham
Interviewed Guest
Graham Nash
Interviewed Guest
Brian May
Interviewed Guest
Denis Pellerin
Producer
Rebecca Nicholson

Brand

Front Row

Front Row

Gary Barlow; Anita Lasker-Wallfisch; Georgians at the British Library

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Arts news and reviews. John Wilson talks singer-songwriter and X Factor judge Gary Barlow.

John Wilson talks singer-songwriter and X Factor judge Gary Barlow, to cellist and Auschwitz survivor Anita Lasker-Wallfisch, and reviews a new exhibition about the Georgians.

With John Wilson.

Anita Lasker-Wallfisch survived Auschwitz by playing the cello in the Auschwitz Women's Orchestra. After the war she joined the English Chamber Orchestra and her son is the renowned cellist Raphael Wallfisch. On Sunday they both take part in a concert in Vienna marking the 75th anniversary of Kristallnacht. Anita Lasker-Wallfisch's reflects on her time in the prison camp, described in her memoir Inherit the Truth, which is republished this week.

Gary Barlow discusses why it has taken him 14 years to produce a new solo record, how it felt to be dropped from his record label after Take That split, and what he thinks of criticism of The X Factor.

A new British Library exhibition, Georgians Revealed: Life, Style and the Making of Modern Britain makes the case that the Georgians were the architects of modern Britain, introducing many of the interests and pursuits that endure today. Historian Amanda Vickery reviews.

Producer Ellie Bury.

Credits

Presenter
John Wilson
Interviewed Guest
Raphael Wallfisch
Interviewed Guest
Anita Lasker-Wallfisch
Interviewed Guest
Gary Barlow
Producer
Ellie Bury

Brand

Front Row

Front Row

Rijksmuseum reopens; Spring Breakers

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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John Wilson reports on the reopening of the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam after 10 years.

John Wilson reports on the reopening of the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam following a 10-year transformation, plus a review of the film Spring Breakers.

With John Wilson.

John travels to Amsterdam to visit the Rijksmuseum, re-opening after a decade of renovations. The 19th century building - home to Rembrandt's masterpiece The Nightwatch - not only has a new Asian Pavilion and restored galleries, but also the display of its collection has been transformed: visitors can now see the 8,000 exhibits chronologically, following the story of 800 years of Dutch art and history.

Vanessa Hudgens (High School Musical) and Selena Gomez (Wizards Of Waverley Place) are set to shed their clean-cut tween appeal as they star in the film Spring Breakers, alongside James Franco. Four college girls experience the darker side of hedonism after robbing a bank to fund their vacation. Critic Leslie Felperin reviews.

The lead singer of Wire, Colin Newman, discusses the influence of his post-punk band on groups like Blur, Franz Ferdinand and REM, and why they are resurrecting old ideas for their new album Change Becomes Us

Producer Rebecca Nicholson.

Credits

Presenter
John Wilson
Producer
Rebecca Nicholson

Brand

Front Row

Front Row

Tamara Rojo; James Blake; The Place Beyond the Pines

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Dancer Tamara Rojo; musician James Blake; The Place Beyond the Pines starring Ryan Gosling

Tamara Rojo on her plans for the English National Ballet, the verdict on Ryan Gosling and Eva Mendes in the film The Place Beyond The Pines, musician James Blake on his new album.

With John Wilson.

Tamara Rojo is the artistic director of the English National Ballet. This is her first season in charge of a company, after years as principal ballerina at the Royal Ballet, where she danced all the major roles. She talks to John about her vision for the ENB.

The film The Place Beyond The Pines, an epic story of fathers and sons, crime and punishment, stars Ryan Gosling as a motorcycle rider and bank robber whose sins are visited upon his only child. Antonia Quirke delivers her verdict.

James Blake was nominated for the Mercury Prize in 2011 for his self-titled debut album of melancholy electronica, largely made in his bedroom while still at university. His second album Overgrown is released today. He explains how the success of his first release has informed the new record.

On the first day of the MIP TV programmes sales conference at Cannes, TV buyers from around the world are out in force looking for the next drama, format or documentary most likely to prove a global hit. Peter White from Broadcast magazine reports live on the trends coming through so far.

Producer Ellie Bury.

Credits

Presenter
John Wilson
Producer
Ellie Bury
Interviewed Guest
Antonia Quirke
Interviewed Guest
Tamara Rojo
Interviewed Guest
James Blake

Brand

Front Row

Front Row

Sebastião Salgado, Sarah Brightman, The Gatekeepers

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

John Wilson talks to photographer Sebastião Salgado and singer Sarah Brightman.

John Wilson talks to photographer Sebastiao Salgado, and singer and future astronaut Sarah Brightman. Plus, Israeli spy documentary The Gatekeepers is reviewed by Gordon Corera.

With John Wilson.

Sarah Brightman became a household name when her group Hot Gossip had a number 1 hit with I Lost My Heart to a Starship Trooper. She went on to perform in the Andrew Lloyd Webber musicals Cats and The Phantom of the Opera, eventually marrying Lloyd Webber. Aptly enough her latest project is a trip into space, and she discusses her plans for the journey and the album it has inspired.

The Brazilian photographer Sebastiao Salgado has just opened his new exhibition, Genesis, at the Natural History Museum in London. Like his two ambitious earlier projects - Workers and Migrations - Genesis is a long-term exploration of global issues, in a series of large-scale monochrome prints which on this occasion celebrate nature and examine the balance of human relationships with the planet. In a rare interview Sebastiao Salgado discusses the challenge, which was eight years in the making, and which took him to 32 countries and some of the remotest and most inhospitable locations in the world.

The Gatekeepers is a documentary telling the story of Shin Bet, Israel's internal security service. Directed by Dror Moreh, the film includes interviews with six former heads of the service, none of whom had ever spoken on camera before. The BBC's security correspondent Gordon Corera reviews the film which was nominated for an Oscar.

Producer Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Presenter
John Wilson
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

Brand

Front Row

Front Row

Matt Damon's Promised Land, Kacey Musgraves, BBC Proms 2013

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Matt Damon's Promised Land; BBC Proms 2013; singer-songwriter Kacey Musgraves.

John Wilson meets singer-songwriter Kacey Musgraves; Gus Van Sant's film Promised Land, starring Matt Damon; the launch of BBC Proms 2013; photographers using found images.

With John Wilson.

Matt Damon's new film, Promised Land, based on a story by Dave Eggers, focuses on fracking - extracting gas by fracturing rock layers. Damon plays Steve Butler, an executive sent to a rural town to gain drilling rights, who comes into conflict with an environmental campaigner. The film reunites Damon with Good Will Hunting director Gus Van Sant. Natalie Haynes reviews.

Radio 3 and Proms Controller Roger Wright reveals highlights of this summer's BBC Proms season - including Marin Alsop, the first woman to conduct The Last Night Of The Proms.

Singer-songwriter Kacey Musgraves has taken US country and western music by storm, topping the country charts with her songs inspired by the darker side of life in small-town America. Guitar in hand, Kacey Musgraves reflects on her inspirations, and how she hopes to confound the expectations of the music industry.

The contenders for this year's Deutsche Börse Prize for photography include two projects in which the photographers have curated images they have found online, rather than photos they have taken themselves. Mishka Henner, who has gathered images from Google Streetview, and duo Adam Broomberg and Oliver Chanarin, who borrow images from the war on terror, discuss changing ideas about how photographers can capture the world.

Producer Rebecca Nicholson.

Credits

Presenter
John Wilson
Producer
Rebecca Nicholson

Brand

Front Row

Front Row

The Job Lot and The Wright Way; Deep Purple

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

New sitcoms The Job Lot and The Wright Way, and Deep Purple's Ian Gillan and Ian Paice.

A review of two new sitcoms The Job Lot and The Wright Way, an interview with Ian Gillan and Ian Paice from Deep Purple, and one-man show Doktor Glas. With John Wilson.

With John Wilson,

A job centre and a local government Health and Safety department are the settings for two new sitcoms. ITVs The Job Lot stars Russell Tovey (Him & Her) and Sarah Hadland (Miranda). Ben Elton has written the BBC's The Wright Way, which stars David Haig. Viv Groskop reviews.

Ian Gillan and Ian Paice, long-standing members of the band Deep Purple, discuss their forthcoming album Now What?! The heavy metal pioneers also talk about their Smoke on the Water 70s heyday, multiple lineups, and how the band has evolved over the decades.

Krister Henriksson, best-known in Britain as the star of the Swedish TV series Wallander, is making his debut on stage in the UK, in a one-man play, Doktor Glas. Adapted from a classic Swedish novel by Hjalmar Söderberg, it's the tale of a 19th century physician who falls madly in love with the wife of a corrupt clergyman. Will it attract the same enthusiastic audiences who adore Swedish dramas on British television? Author and Wallander fan Kate Saunders gives the critical verdict.

The designer Storm Thorgerson, best known for creating the cover of Pink Floyd's The Dark Side of the Moon, has died. Peter Saville, who designed many memorable record sleeves from the Factory Records era, discusses his influence and music journalist Laura Lee Davies discusses whether there have been any classic albums with disappointing sleeve artwork or music that didn't live up to the promise of its cover.

Producer Claire Bartleet.

Credits

Presenter
John Wilson
Interviewed Guest
Ian Gillan
Interviewed Guest
Ian Paice
Producer
Nicki Paxman

Brand

Front Row

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Using Search Filters.

Media Type filter:
Limit your search to either TV or radio using the radio buttons. Results will show both by default.
Genre Accessibility and Availability filters:
Add or exclude search terms using the add and exclude filter icons.

When you've chosen your filters, hit enter or use the 'Apply Filters' button.

Once a search is returned, add or exclude further terms from the results page and search again. Search results can be reordered by:

  • first or last brodcast dates,
  • availability ending soon,
  • relevance.

Find out more about BBC Programme Explorer