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Front Row

Paul Smith; The Counsellor; Johnny Cash

John Wilson interviews designer Paul Smith, on the eve of a retrospective exhibition.

Arts news with John Wilson, including an interview with designer Paul Smith, on the eve of a major exhibition of his work and influences at the Design Museum, London.

John Wilson talks to the fashion designer Paul Smith, on the eve of a major exhibition of his work and influences at the Design Museum, London.

Natalie Haynes reviews The Counsellor, a film about drug dealers on the US / Mexico border, starring Cameron Diaz, Michael Fassbender, Brad Pitt and Penelope Cruz, with an original screenplay by Cormac McCarthy.

As the Royal Shakespeare Company's production of Richard II, starring David Tennant, is streamed live to cinemas across the UK tonight, Lorne Campbell, artistic director of Northern Stage in Newcastle and Tom Morris from Bristol Old Vic debate the effect that live screening has on regional theatre.

Johnny Cash biographer Robert Hilburn was the only journalist to witness the Folsom Prison Concert in 1968. He talks to John Wilson about Cash's troubled life and career.

Producer Timothy Prosser.

Credits

Presenter
John Wilson
Interviewed Guest
Paul Smith
Interviewed Guest
Natalie Haynes
Interviewed Guest
Lorne Campbell
Interviewed Guest
Tom Morris
Interviewed Guest
Robert Hilburn
Producer
Timothy Prosser

Brand

Front Row

Front Row

Adil Ray, Helen Lederer, Jackie Clune and Mark Billingham compete in the Front Row Quiz

Mark Lawson turns quizmaster as two teams compete in the Front Row Quiz of the Year.

Mark Lawson hosts the Front Row Quiz of the Year. Team captains Natalie Haynes and Mark Billingham are joined by Adil Ray, Helen Lederer, Jackie Clune and Mark Ravenhill.

Mark Lawson turns Quizmaster to test the cultural knowledge of two teams in the Front Row Quiz of the Year.

Singer and performer Jackie Clune and playwright Mark Ravenhill are led by writer and Booker judge Natalie Haynes. They are competing against actress and writer Helen Lederer and Citizen Khan creator and star Adil Ray, under the captaincy of crime writer Mark Billingham.

Questions cover a wide range of the year's events, including Doctor Who's 50th birthday; best-selling autobiographies, with extracts disguised by actor in residence Ewan Bailey; and a mathematical puzzle based around the compositions of Wagner, Britten and Verdi.

Producer Claire Bartleet.

Credits

Presenter
Mark Lawson
Panellist
Natalie Haynes
Panellist
Mark Billingham
Panellist
Adil Ray
Panellist
Helen Lederer
Panellist
Jackie Clune
Panellist
Mark Ravenhill
Producer
Claire Bartleet

Brand

Front Row

Saturday Review

The Revenant, Annie Leibovitz, Nicholas Searle, The Rack Pack, Give Me Your Love

Including a look at Oscar contender The Revenant and the Annie Leibovitz exhibition.

The week's cultural highlights, including Oscar contender The Revenant, the Annie Leibovitz exhibition, Nicholas Searle's The Good Liar and Snooker comedy film The Rack Pack.

Leonardo DiCaprio stars as American pioneers-man Hugh Glass, in Oscar-contender The Revenant. It's graphic, visceral, epic in scope and could sweep the boards at the awards

Photographer Annie Leibovitz has an exhibition of portraits under the title "Women", which will tour the globe. How does she tackle such an enormous subject?

The debut novel by former civil servant Nicholas Searle "the Good Liar" is gaining a lot of attention but do our critics think it's a good book?

BBC iPlayer's first online-only drama is a snooker comedy film 'The Rack Pack' - which tells the story of the rise of the sport in the early 80's from a parlour game to a world-conquering TV fixture.

Give Me Your Love is a play at The Battersea Arts Centre about the treatment of former combatants who have PTSD with MDMA (ecstasy). Is this a wise move?

Tom Sutcliffe's guests are Paul Morley, Natalie Haynes and Jacqueline Springer. The producer is Oliver Jones.

Credits

Presenter
Tom Sutcliffe
Interviewed Guest
Paul Morley
Interviewed Guest
Natalie Haynes
Interviewed Guest
Jacqueline Springer
Producer
Oliver Jones

Saturday Review

Wiener-Dog, Our Ladies of Perpetual Succour, The Summer That Melted Everything, The Hunterian Collection, Ingrid Bergman

Wiener-Dog, Our Ladies of Perpetual Succour, Tiffany McDaniel, Hunterian Collection.

Todd Solondz's Wiener-Dog, National Theatre of Scotland's Our Ladies of Perpetual Succour, The Summer That Melted Everything, The Hunterian Collection at RCS, Ingrid Bergman.

Todd Solondz's latest film Wiener Dog has been described as uniquely misanthropic; will our panellists agree?

The National Theatre of Scotland's production: Our Ladies of Perpetual Succour , written by Lee "Billy Elliot" Hall, arrives in London after a national tour and before it heads to Australia. There's plenty of profanity but is there any profundity?

Tiffany McDaniel's The Summer That Melted Everything is a first novel about the time The Devil came to visit a small southern US town.

The Hunterian Collection at London's Royal College of Surgeons is an unrivalled collections of human and non-human anatomical and pathological specimens, models, instruments, painting and sculptures that reveal the art and science of surgery from the 17th century to the present day.

Ingrid Bergman: In Her Own Words is a new look at the actress whose life scandalised old Hollywood. What does it tell us about fame today.

Sarah Crompton's guests are Natalie Haynes, Amanda Craig and Jake Arnott. The producer is Oliver Jones.

(Main image: Our Ladies of Perpetual Succour. L-R Caroline Deyga (Chell), Kirsty MacLaren (Manda), Melissa Allan (Orla), Frances Mayli McCann (Kylah), Dawn Sievewright (Fionnula), Karen Fishwick (Kay). Photo by Manuel Harlan).

Credits

Presenter
Sarah Crompton
Interviewed Guest
Natalie Haynes
Interviewed Guest
Amanda Craig
Interviewed Guest
Jake Arnott

Saturday Review

Hieronymus Bosch, OJ Simpson, North Water, A Bigger Splash, Battlefield

A look at the biggest Hieronymus Bosch exhibition ever and OJ Simpson's trial as a drama.

The week's cultural highlights, including the biggest Hieronymus Bosch exhibition ever, OJ Simpson's trial as a TV drama and Ian McGuire's North Water.

The biggest Hieronymus Bosch exhibition ever has just opened in Holland. 500 years after his death, Noordbrabants Museum has gathered together the largest collection of his bizarre, extraordinary work

OJ Simpson's 1994 trial has been turned into a US TV drama. Does it have something new to show or say?

Ian McGuire's North Water has garnered positive reviews from the likes of Hilary Mantel and Martin Amis. It's a whodunnit set on board an 18th century whaling ship. "A version of Captain Ahab (if you squint a little) meets a version of Sherlock Holmes"

Ralph Fiennes stars in A Bigger Splash, a tale of louche life set around a swimming pool in a baking hot Italian villa. Also starring Tilda Swinton, Matthius Schoenaerts and Dakota Johnson

Battlefield at The Young Vic is Peter Brook's distillation of his magnum opus Mahabarata. A few short tales which deal with life an immense canvas in miniature

Tom Sutcliffe is joined by Amanda Vickery, Natalie Haynes and Jim White. The producer is Oliver Jones.

Credits

Presenter
Tom Sutcliffe
Interviewed Guest
Amanda Vickery
Interviewed Guest
Natalie Haynes
Interviewed Guest
Jim White
Producer
Oliver Jones

Saturday Review

Alone In Berlin, Ink, Christopher Wilson, White Cube, Earl Slick and Lied

Alone in Berlin, Ink at Almeida, Christopher Wilson - Zoo, White Cube, Earl Slick and Lied

Emma Thompson in Alone in Berlin, Ink at The Almeida, Christopher Wilson's novel Zoo, Women and Surrealism at White Cube, TV music documentaries about Earl Slick and Lied.

Emma Thompson and Brendan Gleeson in a film adaptation of Hans Fallada's novel Alone In Berlin - based on a true story of small scale wartime heroism.

Ink - a play about Rupert Murdoch's acquisition of The Sun in 1969 and the grubby world of redtop journalism.Opening at London's Almeida Theatre.

Christopher Wilson's novel; Zoo, a comedy set in Stalin's dying days, about a boy who inadvertently becomes the food taster for The Man of Iron

Dreamers Awake is a new exhibition at White Cube Gallery looking at women in the Surrealist movement and its lasting influence on female artists

2 TV music documentaries about famous rock sideman including Earl Slick (who played guitar with David Bowie, John Lennon and many more) and Becoming a Lied Singer in which Baritone Thomas Quasthoff gives his personal guide to Lieder - poems of nature, love and death for solo voice and piano.

Tom Sutcliffe's guests will be Stephen Hough, Georgie Hopton and Natalie Haynes. The producer is Oliver Jones.

Credits

Presenter
Tom Sutcliffe
Interviewed Guest
Stephen Hough
Interviewed Guest
Georgie Hopton
Interviewed Guest
Natalie Haynes
Producer
Oliver Jones

Saturday Review

Gillian Anderson Streetcar, Mood Indigo film, Secret Cinema, Philip Hensher, Gomorrah on TV

Gillian Anderson Streetcar, Mood Indigo, Secret Cinema, Philip Hensher, Gomorrah on TV.

Gillian Anderson in Tennessee Williams's Streetcar Named Desire, Michel Gondry's film Mood Indigo, Secret Cinema: Back to the Future, Philip Hensher's Emperor Waltz, Gomorrah on TV.

Gillian Anderson returns to London's West End theatre, playing Blanche Dubois in Tennessee Williams' 1948 play A Streetcar Named Desire.

Michel Gondry's Mood Indigo is one of his typically fantastical films, starring Audrey Tatou as a young woman who discovers a flower is growing inside her lungs. Packed full of extraordinary images, is it a collection of moments or a good film?

Secret Cinema is the new immersive form of cinema, staged in unconventional settings, encouraging the audience to dress up in clothing appropriate to the movie, their latest production is the 1985 classic Back To The Future. It can be expensive to stage and attend, but is it worth it?

Philip Hensher's new novel The Emperor Waltz threads together several stories from different times and locations, dealing with how an idea gains a hold in wider society.

A new Italian TV drama series - Gomorrah - looks at the mafia. It's been an enormous hit in Italy but has this once-toxic subject matter become less controversial nowadays or does it still shock viewers?

Tom Sutcliffe is joined by Natalie Haynes, Susannah Clapp and Patrick Gale. the producer is Oliver Jones.

Credits

Presenter
Tom Sutcliffe
Interviewed Guest
Natalie Haynes
Interviewed Guest
Susannah Clapp
Interviewed Guest
Patrick Gale
Producer
Oliver Jones

Saturday Review

Grayson Perry, Brad Pitt in Fury, Dance Umbrella: Harlem Dream, Per Petterson I Refuse, The Missing

Tom Sutcliffe and guests discuss Grayson Perry at the NPG and Brad Pitt's new film Fury.

Tom Sutcliffe and guests discuss Grayson Perry at the NPG, Brad Pitt and Fury, Dance Umbrella: Harlem Dream, Per Petterson's novel I Refuse, and child abduction in The Missing.

Grayson Perry's new exhibition at London's National Portrait Gallery is called "Who Are You". Through pots and paintings, a hijab and tapestry it explores the nature of identity.

Brad Pitt's latest film Fury follows a tank crew towards the end of WW2, when a rooky soldier joins the grizzled old conflict-hardened team in the hell of war.

London's Young Vic Theatre plays host to Dance Umbrella 2014. We'll be reviewing Harlem Dream - a work by young British choreographer Ivan Blackstock in which The Harlem Renaissance collides with hip hop.

Norwegian writer Per Petterson's 2003 novel Out Stealing Horses won critical acclaim. His newest 'I Refuse' has been hailed as a masterpiece in Norway - what will our panel make of the newly published English translation?

And every parent's nightmare - a child disappears on a family holiday - is the plot of BBC1's new drama The Missing, which stars James Nesbitt.

Tom Sutcliffe's guests are Blake Morrison, Natalie Haynes and Judith Mackrell. The producer is Oliver Jones.

Credits

Presenter
Tom Sutcliffe
Interviewed Guest
Blake Morrison
Interviewed Guest
Natalie Haynes
Interviewed Guest
Judith Mackrell
Producer
Oliver Jones

Front Row

Raised by Wolves, The Staves, Compton Verney, 1990 Boston art heist

Arts news with John Wilson, including a review of Caitlin Moran's series Raised by Wolves.

Caitlin Moran's TV series Raised by Wolves reviewed, plus The Staves on their new album If I Was, country mansion Compton Verney reopens, and the 1990 Boston art heist revisited.

Raised by Wolves is a new sitcom written by author Caitlin Moran and her sister Catherine. Based in Wolverhampton and set in a large, home-schooled family led by matriarch Stella, the series is loosely based on Moran's own upbringing. Natalie Haynes reviews

As The Staves prepare to release their second album If I Was, the singing Stavely-Taylor sisters - Jessica, Emily and Camilla - discuss recording in Wisconsin with Bon Iver, and how they create their three-part harmonies.

Compton Verney re-opens to the public this weekend. John Wilson visits the country mansion and art gallery and previews two new exhibitions: Canaletto: Celebrating Britain, and The Non-Conformists: Photographs by Martin Parr.

Boston journalist Stephen Kurkjian, and Antony Amore, head of security at the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston, look back at the world's largest private property theft there 25 years ago when artworks by Rembrandt and Vermeer were stolen and never seen again.

Presenter John Wilson

Producer Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Presenter
John Wilson
Interviewed Guest
Natalie Haynes
Interviewed Guest
Jessica Staveley-Taylor
Interviewed Guest
Emily Staveley-Taylor
Interviewed Guest
Camilla Staveley-Taylor
Interviewed Guest
Stephen Kurkjian
Interviewed Guest
Anthony Amore
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

Brand

Front Row

Free Thinking

Australian novelist Peter Carey

Peter Carey talks to Rana Mitter about race and racing, on the subject of his latest novel

A car race around Australia is fictionalised in Peter Carey's latest novel. Josephine Quinn asks did the Phoenicians exist? & TS Eliot Prize winner Ocean Vuong - with Rana Mitter.

A car race around Australia is fictionalised in Peter Carey's latest novel. He talks to Rana Mitter about depicting race and racing. Josephine Quinn questions whether the Phoenicians existed as she looks at the way ancient texts and artworks helped construct an identity for the ancient civilization on the coast of the Mediterranean Sea, stretching through what is now Syria, Lebanon and northern Israel. Classicist and novelist Natalie Haynes discusses Ovid's tales and Rana Mitter speaks to this year's TS Eliot Prize winner Ocean Vuong.

Peter Carey's latest novel is called A Long Way Home.

Josephine Quinn has published In Search of the Phoenicians.

Natalie Haynes most recent novel is called The Children of Jocasta. Radio 3's The Essay this week consists of five retellings of Ovid.

Ocean Vuong's Night Sky with Exit Wounds is out now.

Producer: Debbie Kilbride.

Credits

Presenter
Rana Mitter
Interviewed Guest
Peter Carey
Interviewed Guest
Josephine Quinn
Interviewed Guest
Natalie Haynes
Producer
Debbie Kilbride

Front Row

Christopher Ricks on TS Eliot, Arthur Miller play premier, Top picks for non-fiction books of 2015

Literary critic Christopher Ricks discusses TS Eliot's annotated poems. With John Wilson.

Arts news with John Wilson, including literary critic Christopher Ricks on TS Eliot's annotated poems and a review of the Arthur Miller play No Villain.

John Wilson talks to the great literary critic Christopher Ricks about the monumental annotated poems of T. S. Eliot that he has co-edited. It runs to 2,000 pages, but only one in eight is verse, the others notes, commentary and context.

Arthur Miller's plays are performed on major stages throughout the world. But his very first drama No Villain is getting its world premier this week in a tiny theatre, above a London pub. Front Row reveals how this came about and Christopher Bigsby, Miller's biographer, reviews the production. No Villain runs at the Old Red Lion Theatre until 9 January.

Journalist and author Max Hastings and writer and comedian Natalie Haynes give a helping hand with this year's Christmas present shopping by picking their favourite non-fiction books of 2015.

Credits

Presenter
John Wilson
Interviewed Guest
Christopher Ricks
Interviewed Guest
Christopher Bigsby
Interviewed Guest
Max Hastings
Interviewed Guest
Natalie Haynes
Producer
Elaine Lester

Brand

Front Row

Front Row

Margaret Atwood, Emily Blunt, You, Me and the Apocalypse, Reading Europe

Margaret Atwood discusses her new novel The Heart Goes Last. Kirsty Lang presents.

Arts news with Kirsty Lang, including Margaret Atwood on her new novel, Emily Blunt on playing an FBI agent, TV satire You, Me and the Apocalypse, and German author Sascha Arango.

Margaret Atwood discusses her new novel The Heart Goes Last. Set in the near future, the plot follows a couple who sign up for a new utopian community to escape the world of toxic debt, homelessness and violence. But all is not quite what it seems in the picture perfect town of Consilience where the townsfolk take turns playing prisoners and civilians.

Actress Emily Blunt talks to Kirsty about her latest role as FBI agent Kate Macer in drug cartel film Sicario. She discusses training with FBI agents to research the role and the position of women in Hollywood action blockbusters.

Sky's new comedy drama, You, Me and the Apocalypse, imagines the world on the brink of disaster as a meteorite hurtles towards earth, threatening to wipe out the human race. The British and American cast includes Rob Lowe as a foul mouthed Priest and Pauline Quirke. Natalie Haynes reviews.

Radio 4's Reading Europe season continues with contemporary literature from Germany. Award-winning German screenwriter Sascha Arango discusses his first novel, The Truth and Other Lies, a dark thriller which has become a best-seller in Germany and has been published in twenty five countries.

Claudia Rankine has won the Forward Prize for poetry for her latest collection, she reads one of the poems from Citizen: An American Lyric.

Presenter: Kirsty Lang

Producer: Olivia Skinner.

Credits

Presenter
Kirsty Lang
Interviewed Guest
Margaret Atwood
Interviewed Guest
Emily Blunt
Interviewed Guest
Natalie Haynes
Interviewed Guest
Sascha Arango
Reader
Claudia Rankine
Producer
Olivia Skinner

Brand

Front Row

Front Row

Ewan McGregor, Upstart Crow, Katie Paterson, Frankenstein ballet

Kirsty Lang talks to Ewan McGregor, and Ben Elton writes a TV a comedy about Shakespeare.

Arts news, interviews and reviews. Kirsty Lang talks to Ewan McGregor about Our Kind of Traitor, and Ben Elton returns to TV with a comedy starring David Mitchell as Shakespeare.

Ewan McGregor stars in Our Kind of Traitor, based on a John Le Carré novel. The plot follows a couple on holiday in Marrakech who strike up a friendship with a Russian man who turns out to be a mafia kingpin. Ewan McGregor describes how the author visited the set and gave his blessing to play his character as a Scot.

Upstart Crow sees the comedic quill of Blackadder writer Ben Elton return to the Elizabethan era. Starring David Mitchell this new BBC comedy follows William Shakespeare as he tries in vain to write some of his most famous works. Natalie Haynes reviews.

Artist Katie Paterson is busy right now with work showing at The Lowry and Somerset House, and a new public artwork called Hollow, made from 10,000 tree samples from across the world, about to be unveiled at the University of Bristol. She discusses her fascination with capturing time, distance, and space.

Liam Scarlett is Artist in Residence at The Royal Ballet, and his latest work is a brand new ballet based on Mary Shelley's Frankenstein. He discusses what drew him to the gothic novel, and reveals how he choreographed such a complex emotional story to a brand new score by Lowell Liebermann.

Presenter: Kirsty Lang

Producer: Angie Nehring.

Credits

Interviewed Guest
Ewan McGregor
Interviewed Guest
Natalie Haynes
Interviewed Guest
Katie Paterson
Interviewed Guest
Liam Scarlett
Presenter
Kirsty Lang
Producer
Angie Nehring

Brand

Front Row

Saturday Review

Sweet Country, High Society at Rijksmuseum, Macbeth at National, Wendy Cope, David Byrne

Sweet Country, High Society at Rijksmuseum, Macbeth at National, Wendy Cope, David Byrne.

Australian film Sweet Country, High Society in Amsterdam, Rory Kinnear and Anne Marie Duff in Macbeth, Wendy Cope's Anecdotal Evidence and David Byrne's latest release.

Australian film Sweet Country is an Australian Western set in the 1920s - can there be justice when an aboriginal man kills a white farmer in self defence.

High Society is a new exhibition at The Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam - a series of life-size portraits from the masters of art history from Rembrandt to Manet and Velasquez.

The National Theatre's latest production stars Rory Kinnear and Anne Marie Duff in Macbeth.

Wendy Cope's first collection of poetry in 7 years is Anecdotal Evidence

David Byrne has been one of the most consistently inventive and exciting musicians and performers for more than 4 decades. His latest release American Utopia is his first solo album for nearly a decade-and-a-half and looks at the state of the US right now. What does his eye alight upon and what does he make of it...?

Tom Sutcliffe's guests are Sir Richard Eyre, Tracy Chevalier and Natalie Haynes. The producer is Oliver Jones.

Credits

Presenter
Tom Sutcliffe
Interviewed Guest
Richard Eyre
Interviewed Guest
Tracy Chevalier
Interviewed Guest
Natalie Haynes
Producer
Oliver Jones

Front Row

Viggo Mortensen, Susanne Bier, Jay McInerney and the comic Misty

Viggo Mortensen on Captain Fantastic and Jay McInerney on his new novel set in Manhattan.

Viggo Mortensen on Captain Fantastic, Susanne Bier on female directors in film, Jay McInerney on his latest novel set in Manhattan, and a return of the 70s comic for girls, Misty.

The new film Captain Fantastic tells the story of a family whose left-wing patriarch has decided to raise his six children deep in the woods of the Pacific northwest of America. Viggo Mortensen talks about playing the idealistic but often dictatorial father in what's been called his best performance yet.

The author Jay McInerney became an instant literary celebrity at the age of 24 with his 1984 novel Bright Lights, Big City set in New York's yuppie party scene. He talks about his latest book, Bright, Precious Days, the third volume in his trilogy following an Ivy League-educated Manhattan couple, and how the class of 1980 has fared in the 21st century.

Academy Award-winning writer and Danish director Susanne Bier usually works on feature films but made her TV debut with The Night Manager, which aired earlier this year. The experience of working in television has led her to criticise the film industry for its treatment of women directors; restricting them to making movies that are categorised as 'women's films' or as arthouse and niche. She's now being talked about as the director of the next Bond movie - so has she changed her mind?

In its 70s heyday, the horror comic for girls, Misty, sold over 160,000 copies per week. As two original stories are reissued, Misty's co-creator Pat Mills and critic Natalie Haynes discuss the comic's appeal and influence.

Presenter: Samira Ahmed

Producer: Rachel Simpson.

Credits

Interviewed Guest
Viggo Mortensen
Interviewed Guest
Jay McInerney
Interviewed Guest
Susanne Bier
Interviewed Guest
Pat Mills
Interviewed Guest
Natalie Haynes
Presenter
Samira Ahmed
Producer
Rachel Simpson

Brand

Front Row

Front Row

Angels in America, Mindhorn, Storytelling in Greek myths

Mindhorn, Tony Kushner on Angels in America, Natalie Haynes and Madeline Miller.

Mindhorn film, Tony Kushner on Angels in America, Natalie Haynes and Madeline Miller discuss the enduring appeal of Greek myths.

Mindhorn is the new film about a faded TV star who reprises his role as an Isle of Man sleuth who has a robotic eye, and can see the truth. Julian Barratt (Mighy Boosh) and Simon Farnaby (Horrible Histories) co-wrote and co-star and talk to Kirsty about poking fun at actorly behaviour, and how the film parodies Bergerac and the Sixty Million Dollar Man.

Tony Kushner on his epic play Angels in America, which he wrote and set during the Aids crisis in America in the 1980s, and which is being revived in a new production at the National Theatre, starring Andrew Garfield, Russell Tovey, Denise Gough and Nathan Lane.

Madeline Miller, the Orange Prize winning author of The Song of Achilles, and the writer and broadcaster Natalie Haynes, whose new book The Children of Jocasta retells with the story of Antigone, discuss turning the tales of the Greek myths into novels and why the ancient legends still have a contemporary and universal appeal.

Presenter Kirsty Lang

Producer Dymphna Flynn.

Credits

Presenter
Kirsty Lang
Interviewed Guest
Tony Kushner
Interviewed Guest
Julian Barratt
Interviewed Guest
Simon Farnaby
Interviewed Guest
Madeline Miller
Interviewed Guest
Natalie Haynes
Producer
Dymphna Flynn

Brand

Front Row

Saturday Review

David Tennant as Richard II; The Goldfinch; Enough Said

Tom Sutcliffe and guests discuss David Tennant's starring role in Richard II at the RSC.

Tom Sutcliffe discusses David Tennant's starring role in Richard II, in Gregory Doran's first production as Artistic Director at the Royal Shakespeare Theatre in Stratford.

Tom Sutcliffe and guests Sarfraz Manzoor, Natalie Haynes and Peter Kemp discuss David Tennant's starring role in Richard II, in Gregory Doran's first production as Artistic Director at the Royal Shakespeare Theatre in Stratford, following on from David Tennant's successful performance as Hamlet in 2008. Richard II is the first in a cycle of Shakespeare's history plays which will be performed over subsequent seasons.

Donna Tartt's long awaited third novel is The Goldfinch, published 11 years after The Little Friend and 21 years after her memorable debut The Secret History. The entire book revolves around a stolen painting, Dutch artist Carel Fabritius's The Goldfinch, which in reality hangs in The Hague's Royal Picture Gallery. Starting like her previous two novels with a gripping account of a death, will it live up to the hype?

The Ey Exhibition Paul Klee - Making Visible opens at Tate Modern Bankside, and focuses on the decade Klee spent teaching and working at the Bauhaus, the hotbed of modernist design. The abstract canvases Klee produced there, such as the rhythmical composition Fire in the Evening 1929, took his reputation to new international heights.

James Gandolfini and Julia Louis-Dreyfus star in Nicole Holofcener's new film, a rom com Enough Said. Gandolfini starred in the hit television series The Sopranos and died suddenly of a heart attack earlier this year.

And in a new BBC Two comedy drama, David Mitchell and Robert Webb star as the British ambassador and his Mission deputy who are busy in Tazbekistan, trying to secure a 2 billion pound helicopter deal for the British government.

Producer: Sarah Johnson.

Credits

Presenter
Tom Sutcliffe
Panellist
Sarfraz Manzoor
Panellist
Natalie Haynes
Panellist
Peter Kemp
Producer
Sarah Johnson

Woman's Hour

Ballet dancers and pregnancy

Two professional ballet dancers on combining pregnancy and pas de deux.

The challenges and pleasures of combining pregnancy and dance, and how 'returnships' are helping women rejoin the workforce. Presented by Jenni Murray.

For a ballet dancer, controlling your body and maintaining the perfect physique must be a constant preoccupation. So what happens when you decide you'd like to have a baby and how do you cope with the way pregnancy changes your body and affects your ability to dance?

Why are rock-hard abs and perfectly toned triceps seen as the perfect body shape? In a news series for BBC-4 writer and classicist Natalie Haynes explores the British Museum's exhibition on the Greek preoccupation with the human form and explores how these sculptures capture and enforce the Ancient Greeks ideals of body shape.

Official statistics show a drop in life expectancy for female pensioners - we look at the reasons why.

Plus returnships are a way of getting qualified individuals back to work after a long career break. They are like internships, but for the older, more qualified individual. But do businesses want to hire someone who has been out of work for more than six months?

Presenter Jenni Murray

Producer Beverley Purcell.

Credits

Presenter
Jenni Murray
Interviewed Guest
Sarah Jarvis
Interviewed Guest
Natalie Haynes
Interviewed Guest
Julianne Miles
Interviewed Guest
Julie Thornton
Interviewed Guest
Carmen Nuzzo
Interviewed Guest
Laura McCulloch
Interviewed Guest
Elizabeth Harrod
Producer
Beverley Purcell

Genre

Brand

Woman's Hour

Front Row

Melissa McCarthy, Giorgio Moroder

John Wilson talks to Melissa McCarthy, star of Bridesmaids and new film Spy.

Arts news, interviews and reviews. John Wilson talks to Melissa McCarthy, star of Bridesmaids and new film Spy. Plus the legendary disco producer Giorgio Moroder.

John Wilson talks to Melissa McCarthy, star of Bridesmaids, the upcoming Ghostbusters, and new film Spy, about a backroom CIA analyst who goes undercover.

Giorgio Moroder, who pioneered disco music with hits including Donna Summer's Love to Love you Baby and I Feel Love, discusses his first album in 30 years, Deja Vu.

Natalie Haynes reviews Birthday, Sky's new drama by Joe Penhall, in which Stephen Mangan plays a pregnant man.

Credits

Presenter
John Wilson
Interviewed Guest
Melissa McCarthy
Interviewed Guest
Giorgio Moroder
Interviewed Guest
Natalie Haynes

Brand

Front Row

Saturday Review

On Body And Soul, Our Town, Jennifer Egan, Basquiat, The Deuce

On Body and Soul, Our Town, Jennifer Egan, Basquiat, The Deuce.

On Body and Soul, Berlin's Golden Bear winner for 2017, Our Town at Manchester's Royal Exchange, Jennifer Egan's Manhattan Beach, Basquiat at The Barbican, and HBO TV's The Deuce.

This year's Golden Bear winning film On Body And Soul is a peculiar love story between two social misfits who work at a Hungarian abattoir

A revival of Thornton Wilder's most-performed play Our Town at Manchester's Royal Exchange resets it to reflect the local audience

Jennifer Egan's follow up to her multi prize-winning A Visit From The Goon Squad is Manhattan Beach. Set in the docks of New York during wartime, Egan has described it as "a fairly straightforward, noirish thriller". Will our panel be more effulgent?

A major new exhibition of the work of the late street artist Jean-Michel Basquiat has opened at London's Barbican Centre; was he warmly or suffocatingly embraced by New York's hungry art scene in the 1980s?

HBO TV's new series The Deuce begins on Sky Atlantic

And - if you listen to the podcast version of this programme, you can find out what the reviewers have been enjoying when they're not absorbing stuff for the Saturday Review

Tom Sutclidffe's guests are Natalie Haynes, Arifa Akbar and Peter Kemp. The producer is Oliver Jones.

Credits

Presenter
Tom Sutcliffe
Interviewed Guest
Natalie Haynes
Interviewed Guest
Arifa Akbar
Interviewed Guest
Peter Kemp
Producer
Oliver Jones
Results 1 to 20 of 38

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Alternatively, search using only Search Filter options with an empty search box.

A completely empty search will find all currently available programmes.

Once you have searched, you can add or exclude further terms from the results page and search again.

Find our more about the Programme Explorer.