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Front Row

Conductor Marin Alsop, Philip French, Jean Seberg, returning TV series

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Mark Lawson interviews Marin Alsop, the first woman to conduct the Last Night of the Proms

Marin Alsop, the first woman to conduct the Last Night of the Proms, film critic Philip French on retiring after 50 years, the life of actress Jean Seberg, and returning TV series.

With Mark Lawson.

American conductor Marin Alsop discusses becoming the first woman to conduct the Last Night of the Proms. She also reflects on toying with the idea of conducting with one hand after injuring her wrist, and falling in love with Leonard Bernstein at the age of nine.

As Philip French puts away his pen after being The Observer's film critic for 50 years, coinciding with his 80th birthday today, he discusses the 2,500 films he has watched and the changes he has seen in cinema in that time.

As Bonjour Tristesse is re-released in cinemas, the tragic life of actress Jean Seberg is re-assessed by her biographer Garry McGee. The star of A Bout De Souffle and Saint Joan was a political activist and supporter of the Black Panther movement and became the subject of an investigation by the FBI. She committed suicide in 1979, after her film career had faded away amid bad press and conspiracy theories.

American drama series The Newsroom, created by Aaron Sorkin (The West Wing, The Social Network), returns to our TV screens this week for a second series, and Bad Education, a comedy written by and starring Jack Whitehall, also begins its second run. TV critic Chris Dunkley considers different ways to approach the potentially tricky second series.

Producer Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Presenter
Mark Lawson
Interviewed Guest
Marin Alsop
Interviewed Guest
Philip French
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

Brand

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Front Row

Lee Evans, White House Down, Man Booker shortlist

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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John Wilson with news of the shortlist for the Man Booker Prize for fiction.

Arts news with John Wilson, including comedian Lee Evans on his return to the theatre in Essex, new film White House Down, and the shortlist for the Man Booker Prize for fiction.

With John Wilson.

Comedian Lee Evans returns to stage in Barking in Essex, the last play written by screenwriter Clive Exton (Entertaining Mr Sloane, 10 Rillington Place, Jeeves and Wooster) before his death in 2007. The play centres on a dysfunctional criminal family from Essex and co-stars Sheila Hancock and Keeley Hawes. Lee Evans discusses swearing, Samuel Beckett, and the plumber providing inspiration for his forthcoming tour.

Roland Emmerich, director of disaster movies Independence Day and The Day After Tomorrow, is about to release his latest, White House Down, in which a heavily-armed group of paramilitary invaders target the President of the United States. Kate Muir reviews.

The shortlist for the Man Booker Prize for fiction was announced today. Contenders for the £50,000 prize are Jim Crace, Colm Toibin, Eleanor Catton, Jhumpa Lahiri, NoViolet Bulawayo and Ruth Ozeki. Chair of judges Robert Macfarlane and judge Natalie Haynes discuss their selection. The winner is announced on 15 October.

Producer Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Presenter
John Wilson
Interviewed Guest
Lee Evans
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

Brand

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Austenland, Stephen Poliakoff, Hannah Kent, Elmgreen and Dragset

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Kirsty Lang talks to Stephen Poliakoff, and Viv Groskop reviews romantic comedy Austenland

Kirsty Lang talks to writer Stephen Poliakoff, who looks back at his very first TV drama Hitting Town, and Viv Groskop reviews new romantic comedy Austenland.

With Kirsty Lang.

The romantic comedy Austenland, based on a novel of the same name, centres on a single 30-something American woman who travels to Britain to visit a resort where the Jane Austen era is recreated, hoping to find her very own Colin Firth version of Mr Darcy. Critic Viv Groskop - who was born a stone's throw away from Chawton, where Austen wrote Pride and Prejudice - reviews.

Stephen Poliakoff, writer of Caught On A Train and Shooting The Past, reflects on his controversial debut TV drama Hitting Town, which was made in 1975 and is released on DVD for the first time. Written when he was 23, the TV play made headlines when Mary Whitehouse campaigned for it to be banned, appalled by its storyline about a brother and sister who embark on an incestuous affair. Poliakoff reveals his own sister's reaction to Hitting Town and his other incest drama Close My Eyes.

Australian author Hannah Kent's debut novel Burial Rites tells the story of the last woman executed in Iceland. Set in the winter of 1829 and including real court documents, the book combines Nordic noir with cold case fiction. Kent describes how she first heard about the story when visiting Iceland as a teenager and what drew her to write about the case a decade later.

Artists Elmgreen and Dragset have turned five former textile galleries at the Victoria and Albert Museum into an apartment belonging to a fictional retired architect, using objects from the museum's collection alongside items from antique markets. Kirsty and architecture critic Hugh Pearman visited the apartment to see if they could decode its secrets.

Producer Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Presenter
Kirsty Lang
Interviewed Guest
Stephen Poliakoff
Interviewed Guest
Viv Groskop
Interviewed Guest
Hannah Kent
Interviewed Guest
Hugh Pearman
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

Brand

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John Eliot Gardiner, Le Week-End, Breathless

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Le Week-End and Breathless reviewed, and John Eliot Gardiner on his new book about Bach.

Arts news. Le Week-End reviewed, John Eliot Gardiner discusses his new book on Bach, and neurosurgeon Henry Marsh reviews Breathless, ITV's new hospital drama set in the '60s.

With Mark Lawson

Breathless is a new prime-time period drama from ITV set in a London hospital during the early sixties. The programme follows the lives of a group of doctors and nurses and, like Mad Men and The Hour, combines period glamour with historical social commentary. Neurosurgeon Henry Marsh reviews.

Le Week-End stars Jim Broadbent and Lindsay Duncan as a middle aged couple who embark on a trip to Paris to celebrate their 30th wedding anniversary, with less than romantic results. The comedy is the latest collaboration from writer Hanif Kureishi and director Roger Michell. Jenny McCartney reviews.

The conductor John Eliot Gardiner discusses the life and music of JS Bach, who he regards as the greatest composer. Gardiner's book, which he has spent the last decade writing, presents an "unsanitised" version of Bach, revealing his brutalising schooling, his brushes with the law, and the difficult conditions in which he wrote such masterpieces as The St Matthew Passion and the B Minor Mass.

Producer Stephen Hughes.

Credits

Presenter
Mark Lawson
Interviewed Guest
John Eliot Gardiner
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

Brand

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Judi Dench, Julian Barnes on Daumier, Ambassadors, Ibsen's Ghosts

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Arts news. Dame Judi Dench discusses her role in the film Philomena with Mark Lawson.

Dame Judi Dench discusses her role in the film Philomena, Julian Barnes reviews a new Honoré Daumier exhibition, the verdict on TV series Ambassadors, and Ibsen's Ghosts on stage.

With Mark Lawson.

Dame Judi Dench discusses her role in the new film Philomena, in which she plays a 70-year-old Irish woman who is looking to trace her son, taken away from her when she was a teenager. She discusses portraying and meeting the real Philomena Lee, and working with Steve Coogan, who co-scripted and co-stars in the film as Martin Sixsmith, the man who helped Philomena find her child.

Honoré Daumier was a French printmaker, sculptor and painter whose work offered a social commentary on 19th Century French life. A new exhibition, Visions of Paris, explores his legacy. Booker Prize-winning novelist Julian Barnes reviews the show.

Henrik Ibsen's play Ghosts is enjoying two very different new productions at the moment. In English Touring Theatre's staging, the sets take inspiration from designs originally made for the play by Edvard Munch in 1906. In Richard Eyre's new version, at the Almeida Theatre, London, the transparent walls of the set provide a stark contrast to the secrets hidden by the characters. Tim Hatley who designed the Almeida's production and Sue Prideaux, Munch's biographer, discuss the different approaches to representing the text.

Peep Show stars David Mitchell and Robert Webb reunite in Ambassadors, a TV comedy-drama series about the inner-workings of an embassy in the fictional country of Tazbekistan. Briony Hanson of the British Council delivers her verdict.

Producer Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Presenter
Mark Lawson
Interviewed Guest
Judi Dench
Interviewed Guest
Tim Hatley
Interviewed Guest
Sue Prideaux
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

Brand

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JJ Abrams; Hermione Lee on Penelope Fitzgerald; Time in TV

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Mark Lawson talks to Hermione Lee about her biography of novelist Penelope Fitzgerald.

Hermione Lee discusses her new biography of the late writer Penelope Fitzgerald, JJ Abrams describes his unorthodox new creation 'S', and John Yorke on chronology in TV series.

With Mark Lawson, including an interview with critic and writer Hermione Lee about her new biography of Penelope Fitzgerald, who published her first novel at the age of 60, and won the Booker Prize with her book Offshore at the age of 63.

With the news of a massive find of Nazi looted art in a Munich flat this weekend, Mark speaks to art critic Bill Feaver and Head of Collections at the Berlin Jewish Museum Inka Bertz about the connection to the 1937 "Entartete Kunst" - the Degenerate art exhibition in Berlin which included work by Picasso, Paul Klee, Kandinsky and Nolde.

J J Abrams, the creator of TV series Lost, discusses his latest work - S - a novel where the writing is not just between the lines but in the margins and in scraps of paper embedded between the pages. S tells the story of a book written by a mysterious author and two of its readers who correspond to each other via its yellowing pages. Abrams talks of its conception and why he handed the project to novelist Doug Dorst, while he worked on Star Trek and the new Star Wars movies.

Fresh Meat returns to our screens tonight, joining the students at the beginning of their second year at university. John Yorke, former head of EastEnders and author of Into the Woods: A Five Act Journey into Story, joins Mark to reflect on how TV has used the passage of time to bolster plots and storylines.

Producer Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Presenter
Mark Lawson
Interviewed Guest
Hermione Lee
Interviewed Guest
J.J. Abrams
Interviewed Guest
John Yorke
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

Brand

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Zadie Smith; Actors and audio books; nut; Lady Gaga

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Arts news, including Zadie Smith on her new story The Embassy of Cambodia.

Arts news, including Zadie Smith on her new story The Embassy of Cambodia, actors and audiobooks, a review of nut by debbie tucker green, and new albums by Lady Gaga and Lorde.

With Mark Lawson.

Zadie Smith discusses her new story The Embassy of Cambodia which is 69 pages long, and focuses on Fatou, a young African immigrant in Willesden, north-west London, who flees hardship in her own country only to face a different set of challenges in her new life.

Lady Gaga's third album Artpop is released in the UK next week. Gaga's recent performance on The X Factor to promote the album attracted hundreds of complaints about its explicit nature. Meanwhile Lorde, a 16-year-old from New Zealand, has topped the charts on both sides of the Atlantic singing about the glamorous world of pop that at once attracts and alienates teens. Kitty Empire discusses both singers' albums.

nut is the new play by Olivier award-winning playwright debbie tucker green, whose previous plays include born bad and random. It follows a character called Elayne and those closest to her over one day in contemporary London. Shahidha Bari reviews.

And with news that the actor David Morrissey will voice the audiobook of the singer Morrissey's Autobiography, Front Row reports on an expanding market and wonders why certain actors are cast for certain books, and what part consumer preference plays.

Producer Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Presenter
Mark Lawson
Producer
Jerome Weatherald
Interviewed Guest
Zadie Smith
Interviewed Guest
Kitty Empire
Interviewed Guest
Shahidha Bari

Brand

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Sebastião Salgado, Sarah Brightman, The Gatekeepers

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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John Wilson talks to photographer Sebastião Salgado and singer Sarah Brightman.

John Wilson talks to photographer Sebastiao Salgado, and singer and future astronaut Sarah Brightman. Plus, Israeli spy documentary The Gatekeepers is reviewed by Gordon Corera.

With John Wilson.

Sarah Brightman became a household name when her group Hot Gossip had a number 1 hit with I Lost My Heart to a Starship Trooper. She went on to perform in the Andrew Lloyd Webber musicals Cats and The Phantom of the Opera, eventually marrying Lloyd Webber. Aptly enough her latest project is a trip into space, and she discusses her plans for the journey and the album it has inspired.

The Brazilian photographer Sebastiao Salgado has just opened his new exhibition, Genesis, at the Natural History Museum in London. Like his two ambitious earlier projects - Workers and Migrations - Genesis is a long-term exploration of global issues, in a series of large-scale monochrome prints which on this occasion celebrate nature and examine the balance of human relationships with the planet. In a rare interview Sebastiao Salgado discusses the challenge, which was eight years in the making, and which took him to 32 countries and some of the remotest and most inhospitable locations in the world.

The Gatekeepers is a documentary telling the story of Shin Bet, Israel's internal security service. Directed by Dror Moreh, the film includes interviews with six former heads of the service, none of whom had ever spoken on camera before. The BBC's security correspondent Gordon Corera reviews the film which was nominated for an Oscar.

Producer Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Presenter
John Wilson
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

Brand

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Royal Court's Dominic Cooke; Rachel Whiteread and Elisabeth Frink

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Royal Court's Dominic Cooke, plus new exhibitions of Rachel Whiteread and Elisabeth Frink.

Dominic Cooke on leaving the Royal Court Theatre, new exhibitions by Rachel Whiteread and Elisabeth Frink, and Michael Dobbs and Haydn Gwynne on portraying Margaret Thatcher.

With Mark Lawson.

Dominic Cooke is leaving London's Royal Court Theatre after seven years as Artistic Director. He looks back at his often controversial tenancy and discusses his final production, The Low Road by Bruce Norris.

And in the week that Nicholas Hytner announced the date for his departure as Artistic Director of the National Theatre, Kenneth Branagh, Marianne Elliott, Sam Mendes and Kwame Kwei-Armah reveal where they stand as potential contenders for the top job.

Michael Dobbs, who was Conservative Chief of Staff under Margaret Thatcher, and Haydn Gwynne who is currently portraying Thatcher on stage in The Audience, reflect on the ways that the former Prime Minister has been represented in culture.

And two exhibitions by leading women artists open in London this week. In her new show Detached, Rachel Whiteread continues her exploration of casting the inside of objects including sheds, doors and windows. And sculptor Elisabeth Frink, who died twenty years ago, has an anniversary retrospective which celebrates the four decades of the artist's life in sculptures, drawings and paintings. Rachel Cooke reviews.

Producer Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Presenter
Mark Lawson
Producer
Jerome Weatherald
Interviewed Guest
Lord Michael Dobbs
Interviewed Guest
Haydn Gwynne

Brand

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Artist Richard Wilson; playwright Mike Bartlett; Generation War; Exhibition

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Arts news, including artist Richard Wilson on his vast new Heathrow sculpture Slipstream.

Artist Richard Wilson on his vast new Heathrow sculpture Slipstream; playwright Mike Bartlett on King Charles III; German TV drama Generation War; Joanna Hogg's film Exhibition.

Artist Richard Wilson unveils his vast 77-tonne new silver sculpture, Slipstream, in Heathrow's new Terminal 2 building. Playwright Mike Bartlett, who is currently enjoying a major critical success with King Charles III, discusses his play about the potential future monarch as well as An Intervention which premieres in Watford this week. Booker-winning novelist Rachel Seiffert discusses the new German TV drama series Generation War which follows the lives of five friends in Berlin on different paths through Nazi Germany and World War II. British director Joanna Hogg returns with her third film Exhibition starring Viv Albertine of punk band The Slits. Shahidha Bari reviews.

Producer Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Presenter
John Wilson
Interviewed Guest
Richard Wilson
Interviewed Guest
Mike Bartlett
Interviewed Guest
Rachel Seiffert
Interviewed Guest
Shahidha Bari
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

Brand

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Front Row

Yinka Shonibare, Water Babies, Akhil Sharma, women film directors

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Yinka Shonibare, Water Babies, Akhil Sharma, women film directors.

With Kirsty Lang. Artist Yinka Shonibare at the Brighton Festival, Water Babies in Leicester, novelist Akhil Sharma on his novel Family Life, and a report on women film directors.

The artist Yinka Shonibare MBE talks to Kirsty Lang about his latest work The British Library, a study of immigration in Britain, currently showing at the Brighton Festival. US Novelist Akhil Sharma's new novel Family Life is based on his own family history and the tragedy of his brother's death, so why a novel rather than a memoir? A new report released this morning highlights a significant lack of female film directors on the big and small screen. Drama director Beryl Richards reflects on the findings. And as a new musical version of The Water Babies opens this week at Curve Theatre in Leicester, which features a waterfall, video projections of the performers singing under water and a hologram of Richard E Grant, the director, video designer and one of the actors discuss the mixture of musical theatre and special effects.

Producer Jerome Weatherald

Image: The British Library by Yinka Shonibare MBE.

Credits

Presenter
Kirsty Lang
Interviewed Guest
Yinka Shonibare
Interviewed Guest
Akhil Sharma
Interviewed Guest
Beryl Richards
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

Brand

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Front Row

Margaret Atwood on her first opera, Neel Mukherjee and Quirke

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Margaret Atwood on her first opera, the Glasgow fire, Neel Mukherjee and TV drama Quirke.

Novelist Margaret Atwood on the premiere on her first opera, the Glasgow fire, Neel Mukherjee discusses his novel The Lives of Others, and the director of new film Heli.

Canadian novelist Margaret Atwood discusses the world premiere of her first opera Pauline, live from Vancouver; Ranald McInnes on the Glasgow Art School fire; Neel Mukherjee on his new novel The Lives of Others, set during the political unrest in India in the 1960s; Amat Escalante, director of new film Heli, reveals the background to his drama about drugs, violence and corruption in a remote community in rural Mexico; and Jake Arnott reviews new British TV drama Quirke starring Gabriel Byrne and written by Andrew Davies and Conor McPherson, an adaptation of the novels by Benjamin Black (John Banville).

Producer Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Presenter
Kirsty Lang
Interviewed Guest
Margaret Atwood
Interviewed Guest
Ranald McInnes
Interviewed Guest
Neel Mukherjee
Interviewed Guest
Amat Escalante
Interviewed Guest
Jake Arnott
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

Brand

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Front Row

Placido Domingo, JK Rowling's new novel, Jersey Boys, Ten Pieces

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Placido Domingo, JK Rowling's new novel, Jersey Boys, Ten Pieces.

Placido Domingo on conducting Puccini's Tosca, reviews of JK Rowling's new novel and Clint Eastwood's film Jersey Boys, and Laura Mvula and Julian Lloyd Webber on Ten Pieces.

The tenor, baritone and conductor Plácido Domingo discusses his return to the Royal Opera House to conduct Jonathan Kent's production of Puccini's Tosca. Alex Clark reviews Robert Galbraith's (aka JK Rowling) new novel The Silkworm. Jason Solomons reviews Clint Eastwood's film Jersey Boys, about Frankie Valli and The Four Seasons. And Laura Mvula and Julian Lloyd Webber discuss the new BBC Music initiative Ten Pieces, announced today.

Producer Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Presenter
John Wilson
Interviewed Guest
Placido Domingo
Interviewed Guest
Alex Clark
Interviewed Guest
Jason Solomons
Interviewed Guest
Laura Mvula
Interviewed Guest
Julian Lloyd Webber
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

Brand

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Front Row

Pet Shop Boys, Ian Hislop on Great Britain, Romesh Gunesekera, ENO cuts

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Pet Shop Boys, Ian Hislop on Great Britain, Romesh Gunesekera, ENO cuts.

Pet Shop Boys discuss their Alan Turing BBC Prom, Ian Hislop on Great Britain, Romesh Gunesekera on his new fiction Noontide Toll, ENO's Artistic Director John Berry.

Pet Shop Boys Neil Tennant and Chris Lowe discuss their BBC late-night Prom which includes the world premiere of A Man From the Future, about Enigma codebreaker Alan Turing; Private Eye editor Ian Hislop reviews last night's opening of the Richard Bean play Great Britain starring Billie Piper, which deals with Leveson and the phone-hacking affair; English National Opera's Artistic Director John Berry on today's announcement of Arts Council cuts in funding; and Romesh Gunesekera on Noontide Toll, his new collection of related stories which deal with the effects of Sri Lanka's civil war.

Credits

Presenter
John Wilson
Interviewed Guest
Neil Tennant
Interviewed Guest
Chris Lowe
Interviewed Guest
Ian Hislop
Interviewed Guest
John Berry
Interviewed Guest
Romesh Gunesekera
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

Brand

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Anjelica Huston; City of Culture 2017; Strangers on a Train; Turner

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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As the City of Culture for 2017 is revealed, Mark Lawson talks to the successful bid team.

Arts news with Mark Lawson. Actress Anjelica Huston on her memoir, UK City of Culture 2017, Strangers on a Train, and Turner & the Sea at the National Maritime Museum.

With Mark Lawson.

As the first part of her autobiography is published, actress Anjelica Huston discusses her unconventional childhood with her father, film director John Huston, and why he encouraged her to roll cigars and drink sherry as a child, and what a Samurai warrior was doing in her kitchen.

Hull has been named as UK City of Culture 2017, beating competition from Swansea Bay, Leicester and Dundee. John Godber, playwright and former Artistic Director of Hull Truck Theatre Company, and writer and journalist David Mark discuss Hull's historic and contemporary cultural significance.

Lawrence Fox and Imogen Stubbs star in a new stage version of Strangers on a Train by Craig Warner, based on the novel by Patricia Highsmith, and famously filmed by Hitchcock. Critic Peter Kemp was at the opening night.

Turner & the Sea at the National Maritime Museum claims to be the first full-scale examination of J.M.W. Turner's lifelong fascination with the sea. The exhibition features 120 works by Turner and his contemporaries, including The Fighting Temeraire. Art critic Charlotte Mullins gives her response to this latest Turner show.

Producer: Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Presenter
Mark Lawson
Interviewed Guest
Anjelica Huston
Interviewed Guest
John Godber
Interviewed Guest
David Mark
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

Brand

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Hilary Mantel; Spike Lee's Oldboy; Liberty and Bergdorf's

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Mark Lawson talks to author Hilary Mantel about two new RSC stage productions of her work.

Hilary Mantel on the new RSC stage adaptations of Wolf Hall and Bring Up the Bodies. Plus a review of Spike Lee's new film Oldboy, and two new department store documentaries.

With Mark Lawson.

The RSC's stage adaptations of Hilary Mantel's bestselling novels Wolf Hall and Bring Up the Bodies are currently in rehearsal before their sell-out run in Stratford-upon-Avon. Hilary Mantel and Mike Poulton, who has adapted the novels, discuss the challenges of transposing such vast and densely populated books to the stage.

Critics Catherine Bray and Adam Smith review Oldboy, Spike Lee's re-make of the Korean revenge drama, and discuss how it compares with other Hollywood versions of foreign-language dramas.

The historic department stores Liberty of London and Bergdorf's in New York come under the spotlight this week. A three-part Channel 4 documentary series goes behind the scenes at Liberty's, while a new film Scatter My Ashes at Bergdorf's hears from leading figures in the fashion world about the profile of the family-run store. Finance writer Lucy Kellaway reviews both.

Producer: Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Presenter
Mark Lawson
Interviewed Guest
Hilary Mantel
Interviewed Guest
Mike Poulton
Participant
Catherine Bray
Participant
Adam Smith
Participant
Lucy Kellaway
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

Brand

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Front Row

Kill Your Darlings, John Newman, Emil and the Detectives, Autobiographies

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Arts news, including a review of Daniel Radcliffe in beat poets film Kill Your Darlings.

Daniel Radcliffe in beat poets film Kill Your Darlings reviewed, singer John Newman, Emil and the Detectives on stage, and bestselling autobiographies put to the test.

With John Wilson.

Daniel Radcliffe's latest project is playing the young Allen Ginsberg in Kill Your Darlings. Based on a true story, the film follows a 17-year-old Ginsberg as he starts at Columbia University in 1944. A murder draws him together with Jack Kerouac and William Burroughs and leads to the birth of the Beat Generation. Writer and critic Michael Carlson gives his verdict.

Writers Alex Clark and Danny Kelly discuss which of this year's best-selling autobiographies have the X-factor, judging the works of Morrissey, Sir Alex Ferguson and Jennifer Saunders by artistic impression, revelations, scores settled and sexual content.

Singer John Newman first attracted attention for his vocal on Rudimental's hit single Feel the Love last year. He followed that success this year when both his debut single Love me Again and debut album Tribute topped the UK charts. He reveals where the raw emotion on his album comes from and discusses the challenge of writing a follow-up.

This year's National Theatre Christmas show is an adaptation of Erich KÃstner's classic children's novel Emil and the Detectives. Detective novelist and critic Stephanie Merritt was at the first night and gives her response.

Producer: Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Presenter
John Wilson
Interviewed Guest
Alex Clark
Interviewed Guest
Danny Kelly
Interviewed Guest
John Newman
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

Brand

Front Row

Front Row

Lenny Henry on Nelson Mandela; Lesley Manville; Beauty and the Beast

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Arts news and reviews with Kirsty Lang, including Lenny Henry's tribute to Nelson Mandela.

Arts news with Kirsty Lang. Lenny Henry pays tribute to Nelson Mandela; Lesley Manville on Mike Leigh; Mat Fraser discusses Beauty and the Beast; Fill the Void reviewed.

With Kirsty Lang.

Lenny Henry pays tribute to Nelson Mandela and discusses the role that musicians and comedians played in the movement to free him.

Mat Fraser and Julie Atlas Muz talk about their retelling of Beauty and the Beast. Fraser is one of the UK's best-known disabled performers and Muz is one of New York's most famous burlesque artists. They met whilst performing at a Freak show on Coney Island and their love story entwines with that of Beauty and the Beast.

Lesley Manville discusses her acting career and her two new productions, Ghosts on stage and The Christmas Candle on film.

Jason Solomons reviews Fill The Void, a new Israeli film about an arranged marriage.

Producer: Stephen Hughes.

Credits

Presenter
Kirsty Lang
Interviewed Guest
Lenny Henry
Interviewed Guest
Mat Fraser
Interviewed Guest
Julie Muz
Interviewed Guest
Lesley Manville
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

Brand

Front Row

Front Row

Christos Tsiolkas, Tim's Vermeer, Maxim Vengerov, new US TV cop dramas

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Christos Tsiolkas, author of The Slap, discusses his new novel Barracuda with Mark Lawson.

Christos Tsiolkas, author of the Man Booker-longlisted The Slap, discusses his new novel Barracuda; new film Tim's Vermeer; violinist Maxim Vengerov; and two new US TV cop shows.

With Mark Lawson.

Australian writer Christos Tsiolkas, who came to worldwide recognition with his controversial novel The Slap, discusses his follow up, Barracuda, the story of a young man with the potential to become an Olympic swimming champion and his struggle with self-acceptance.

Violinist Maxim Vengerov, who is performing a series of concerts at London's Barbican this year, discusses the challenges of the more demanding elements of the repertoire, how he responds to different audiences, and how he alters his playing technique to suit the acoustics of a venue.

Tracy Chevalier, author of Girl With a Pearl Earring, reviews a new documentary film Tim's Vermeer, in which inventor Tim Jenison attempts to understand and recreate the painting techniques used by Dutch Master Johannes Vermeer.

Two American cop shows begin on TV this week. Mob City, created by Oscar-nominated writer Frank Darabont, is a neo-noir drama looking at the LAPD in the 1940s. Brooklyn Nine-Nine won two Golden Globes at this weekend's ceremony and takes a comic look at the exploits of a contemporary Brooklyn police department. Crime fiction expert Jeff Park delivers his verdict on the two shows.

Producer: Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Presenter
Mark Lawson
Interviewed Guest
Christos Tsiolkas
Interviewed Guest
Maxim Vengerov
Interviewed Guest
Tracy Chevalier
Interviewed Guest
Jeff Park
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

Brand

Front Row

Front Row

Ralph Fiennes, EL Doctorow, The Last Leg

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Arts news with Mark Lawson, including Ralph Fiennes on directing The Invisible Woman.

Ralph Fiennes on directing and acting in The Invisible Woman; US author EL Doctorow discusses his new novel Andrew's Brain; and Adam Hills and Josh Widdicombe on The Last Leg.

With Mark Lawson.

Ralph Fiennes discusses his latest film The Invisible Woman, about the relationship between Charles Dickens and his mistress, which Fiennes stars in and directs.

In his latest novel, the American author E L Doctorow takes us on a journey into the mind of a man who, more than once in his life, has been the cause of disaster, albeit inadvertently. In Andrew's Brain he thinks and talks about the various events of his life that have lead him to this point in time. E L Doctorow describes how he came up with this particular character, and the novel-writing process.

This week sees the return of Channel 4's topical comedy series The Last Leg. The show became a hit when it was first broadcast during the 2012 Paralympics and this new series will provide an offbeat take on the forthcoming Sochi Winter Olympics and Paralympics. Presenters Adam Hills and Josh Widdicombe discuss the surprise popularity of the format and the appetite for representations of disability on television.

Producer Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Presenter
Mark Lawson
Interviewed Guest
Ralph Fiennes
Interviewed Guest
E. L. Doctorow
Interviewed Guest
Adam Hills
Interviewed Guest
Josh Widdicombe
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

Brand

Front Row

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