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Front Row

Nick Payne on Wanderlust, YolanDa Brown, Battersea Arts Centre after the fire

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Wanderlust's creator Nick Payne, and BAC's Grand Hall re-opens after the fire in 2015.

Writer Nick Payne on his TV drama series Wanderlust, Battersea Arts Centre's Grand Hall re-opens three years after the fire, plus saxophonist YolanDa Brown.

Nick Payne, the writer of new BBC One series Wanderlust starring Toni Collette and Steven Mackintosh, discusses adapting his play on modern sexual relationships into a sexually upfront series for mainstream TV.

In 2015 the Grand Hall of Battersea Arts Centre in London was devastated by fire. It was rebuilt and last week reopened - with the show that was in the space when it was destroyed. The architect Steve Tompkins and artistic director David Jubb show Samira (who used to dance there in her youth) around, and explain how the fire was an opportunity as well as a disaster.

As she embarks on a national tour, saxophonist YolanDa Brown discusses her love of reggae, jazz and soul, and performs live.

Presenter Samira Ahmed

Producer Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Presenter
Samira Ahmed
Interviewed Guest
Nick Payne
Interviewed Guest
Steve Tompkins
Interviewed Guest
David Jubb
Interviewed Guest
YolanDa Brown
Performer
YolanDa Brown
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

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Front Row

Alison Brackenbury, Vaseem Khan and Testament reveal their finished artworks for the Inspire season

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Three artists unveil the work they've created for Front Row's Inspire season.

Poet Alison Brackenbury, novelist Vaseem Khan and rapper and beatboxer Testament reveal their finished artworks for Front Row's Inspire season.

As Front Row's Inspire season draws to a close, three artists unveil the artworks they were commissioned to create, and discuss the inspiration behind them.

Alison Brackenbury has written a poem based on her Great-Uncle; crime-writer Vaseem Khan, author of the Baby Ganesh Detective Agency novels, reads the first page of his new volume; and rapper and beatboxer Testament performs his new composition.

And for the Front Row presenters' challenge, Stig Abell has written his first sonnet, Samira Ahmed has been taught to draw a comic-book character, and John Wilson has painted his first watercolour. Tonight it's Kirsty Lang's turn at the potter's wheel.

Presenter Kirsty Lang

Producer Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Interviewed Guest
Alison Brackenbury
Interviewed Guest
Vaseem Khan
Interviewed Guest
Testament
Presenter
Kirsty Lang
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

Brand

Front Row

Front Row

Live from Edinburgh with drag act Denim, Maggie O'Farrell, Penelope Skinner and Terry O'Donovan

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Drag queen band Denim, Maggie O'Farrell, and dramatizing our online lives.

Author Maggie O'Farrell on her unconventional memoir, detailing her 17 brushes with death, performance from drag girl band Denim, and two plays that dramatize our online lives.

The drag girl band Denim was Cambridge University's first drag troupe when they formed in 2010. Now, they're back in Edinburgh and for Front Row perform a song from their Reunion Tour and discuss how their drag comes with a political and uplifting message.

Author Maggie O'Farrell talks about the art of writing life stories as her own memoir I Am, I Am, I Am tops the bestseller charts, structured around 17 moments in her life when death came terrifyingly close.

Two new plays, Angry Alan and User Not Found, focus on online identities - with Angry Alan already winning a Fringe First prize. Writer Penelope Skinner and creator Terry O'Donovan talk to Kirsty about dramatizing online experiences and legacies.

Presenter : Kirsty Lang

Producer : Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Presenter
Kirsty Lang
Interviewed Guest
Denim
Interviewed Guest
Maggie O'Farrell
Interviewed Guest
Penelope Skinner
Interviewed Guest
Terence O'Donovan
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

Brand

Front Row

Front Row

John Hurt's paintings, The Fool in King Lear, Summer reads for the UK

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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John Hurt as Artist, and the role of the Fool in King Lear.

Sir John Hurt's widow Anwen on the late actor's paintings and drawings; the role of the Fool in King Lear; and recommendations for summer reading for those holidaying in the UK.

John Hurt as Artist is a new exhibition in Norfolk which reveals a less well-known side of the actor who died last year. Sir John Hurt's widow Anwen discusses the mainly figurative paintings and drawings which mostly relate to the actor's off-screen life, but also include self-portraits of him in prosthetic make-up for his role as John Merrick in The Elephant Man from 1980.

Ian McKellen is playing King Lear in the West End and recently Anthony Hopkins played him on television. Accompanying Lear on his bleak and tragic journey is his Fool. Karl Johnson, Fool to Anthony Hopkins' Lear, and Lloyd Hutchinson, McKellen's Fool, discuss the way they approach this enigmatic figure.

Recently we've been offering inspiration on holiday reading to help you choose which books to cram into your suitcase. Today New Statesman book critic Sarah Ditum concludes the series with a set of recommendations for people holidaying closer to home, in the UK and Ireland.

Presenter Kirsty Lang

Producer Jerome Weatherald.

Main image: Sir John Hurt printmaking. Credit: Andi Sapey

Credits

Presenter
Kirsty Lang
Interviewed Guest
Anwen Hurt
Interviewed Guest
Karl Johnson
Interviewed Guest
Lloyd Hutchinson
Interviewed Guest
Sarah Ditum
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

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Front Row

Rob Brydon on Swimming With Men, Laura Wade, Ferens Art Gallery

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Rob Brydon on the set of film Swimming With Men, playwright Laura Wade, Claude Lanzmann.

On the set of Swimming With Men with Rob Brydon and Daniel Mays, Laura Wade, writer of Home, I'm Darling, final report on Art Fund Museum of the Year from Ferens Art Gallery, Hull.

Rob Brydon, Daniel Mays and Adeel Akhtar were among the actors spending long hours in swimming pools last summer rehearsing for, and shooting, the new British film Swimming With Men, based on a true story about a group of male synchronised swimmers competing in the world championships. Stig Abell reports from the set at Basildon swimming pool, which was masquerading as Milan, the venue for the finals.

Laura Wade, the playwright behind Posh and the stage adaption of Tipping the Velvet, discusses Home, I'm Darling, her new a play about a modern couple trying emulate the happy domesticity of the 1950s.

With the announcement of the winner of the £100,000 Art Fund Museum of the Year 2018 later this evening, we have our final report from the five finalists. So far we've heard from Brooklands Museum in Weybridge, Glasgow Women's Library, The Postal Museum in London, and Tate St Ives. Tonight we visit Ferens Art Gallery in Hull, which was at the heart of Hull UK City of Culture last year.

Filmmaker and writer Claude Lanzmann, famous for Shoah - his 1985 epic exploration of the Holocaust, has died. He's remembered by the writer and cultural critic Agnes Poirier.

Presenter Stig Abell

Producer Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Presenter
Stig Abell
Interviewed Guest
Rob Brydon
Interviewed Guest
Daniel Mays
Interviewed Guest
Adeel Akhtar
Interviewed Guest
Laura Wade
Interviewed Guest
Agnes Poirier
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

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Front Row

Bartlett Sher and The King and I, Olivia Laing, Museum of the Year report

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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The King and I director Bartlett Sher, and Olivia Laing on her debut novel Crudo.

Bartlett Sher on directing The King and I on stage, Olivia Laing on her debut novel Crudo, and an Art Fund Museum of the Year shortlistee The Postal Museum in London.

Bartlett Sher's adaption of The King and I won four Tony Awards during its run on Broadway and is transferring to London this month. The American director was highly praised for his updating of the Rodgers and Hammerstein musical, which is set in 19th century Siam but has been criticised for sexism and orientalism. Bartlett Sher discusses taking on this classic musical for a modern-day audience.

Writer and critic Olivia Laing, known for her non-fiction writing about art, sexuality and cities, discusses her debut novel. Crudo is a highly personal 'real time' account of the political and social upheavals taking place across the world during the summer of 2017, told from the dual perspectives of the writer herself and American experimental novelist Kathy Acker.

Ahead of the announcement next week of the winner of the £100,000 Art Fund Museum of the Year 2018, we'll be reporting from each of the five shortlisted museums, starting today with The Postal Museum in London, and its famous subterranean Mail Rail, which opened to the public last year.

Credits

Presenter
Samira Ahmed
Producer
Jerome Weatherald
Interviewed Guest
Bartlett Sher
Interviewed Guest
Olivia Laing

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Lee Miller and Surrealism in Britain, GLOW star Kate Nash, Pop-up arts

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Singer and GLOW star Kate Nash, and model-turned-photographer Lee Miller and Surrealism.

Lee Miller and Surrealism in Britain at the Hepworth Wakefield, English singer Kate Nash on her role in the wrestling TV drama GLOW, and pop-up arts in the UK.

The American photographer and former model Lee Miller had a leading role in championing Surrealism in Britain in the 1930s, which is the focus of a new exhibition at the Hepworth Wakefield. The show's curator Lauren Barnes, and Lee Miller's son Antony Penrose, consider her fascination for Surrealism and the artists involved, including Man Ray, Max Ernst and Salvador Dalí.

Singer Kate Nash discusses dealing with fame after the success of her debut album Made of Bricks and the mega hit single Foundations. She explains how learning to wrestle for her role in Netflix comedy GLOW rebuilt her confidence and how her new album, Yesterday Was Forever, was inspired by her teenage diary.

Pop-up restaurants, which appear in empty shops and car parks, have enlivened our food culture, and even had a rejuvenating impact on neighbourhoods. There are also pop-up galleries, music performance spaces and even, in York, a whole pop-up Shakespeare theatre and village. Cat Gardiner who has run pop-up galleries in Cardiff, the musician Sam Lee who is taking concerts out of buildings and putting them around campfires, and James Cundall, the man behind Shakespeare's Rose Theatre in York, discuss the impact of arts pop-ups.

Credits

Presenter
Stig Abell
Producer
Jerome Weatherald
Interviewed Guest
Kate Nash
Interviewed Guest
Cat Gardiner
Interviewed Guest
Sam Lee
Interviewed Guest
James Cundall
Interviewed Guest
Lauren Barnes
Interviewed Guest
Antony Penrose

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Front Row

Rupert Everett, Abir Mukherjee, Sex and the City 20 years on

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Rupert Everett on writing, directing and playing Oscar Wilde in The Happy Prince.

Rupert Everett disusses playing Oscar Wilde in The Happy Prince; novelist Abir Mukherjee on his latest, Smoke and Ashes; Sex and the City, 20 years on; and the late Mary Wilson.

Rupert Everett discusses his life-long passion for Oscar Wilde as he directs, writes and stars in his film The Happy Prince. Framed around Wilde's short story of the same name, the bio-pic focuses on Wilde at the end of his life, from his release from prison to his death in poverty in Paris three years later.

Abir Mukherjee's creation of detective Sam Wyndham, a British officer who finds himself in Calcutta in the 1920s, and his sidekick 'Surrender-Not' Bannerjee, won him a £10,000 publishing deal. He discusses the third book in the series, Smoke and Ashes, set against the backdrop of non-violent protest and increasing demands for Indian independence.

Twenty years ago this week Sex and the City launched in America on the HBO channel. To mark the anniversary, TV critic Emma Bullimore pours herself a Cosmopolitan and looks back at her favourite show...

Mary Wilson, who died yesterday at the age of 102, was in the public eye as the wife of the former Prime Minister Harold Wilson. She was lampooned in Mrs Wilson's Diary in Private Eye as a suburban down-to-earth middle class housewife. She was, though, something much rarer - a very popular poet. From the archive we hear her talking about her writing, the public response, and one of her poems.

Presenter Samira Ahmed

Producer Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Presenter
Samira Ahmed
Interviewed Guest
Rupert Everett
Interviewed Guest
Abir Mukherjee
Interviewed Guest
Emma Bullimore
Interviewed Guest
Mary Wilson
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

Brand

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Front Row

Westminster Abbey, The culture of the countryside, Gillian Allnutt

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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A visit to the Queen's Diamond Jubilee Galleries at Westminster Abbey.

Tom Dyckhoff assesses the £23m Weston Tower and the Queen's Diamond Jubilee Galleries at Westminster Abbey. Plus the appeal of the countryside to writers and poet Gillian Allnutt.

The £23m Weston Tower and the Queen's Diamond Jubilee Galleries at Westminster Abbey will be opening to the public next month. Architecture critic and historian Tom Dyckhoff gives his response to these two new additions to the abbey church, the site of all royal coronations since William the Conqueror in 1066.

Why are so many British writers setting their stories in the countryside at the moment? From the second series of the BBC comedy drama This Country, to plays including Barney Norris's Nightfall, Joe White's Mayfly and Simon Longman's Gundog, and novels such as Jon McGregor's Reservoir 13 and Ali Smith's Autumn, writers are turning to a new vision of 'the pastoral' for inspiration. Writer Barney Norris joins novelist Sarah Hall - who was born and raised in the Lake District - to consider whether writing about the countryside has become part of the zeitgeist again and why.

Gillian Allnutt's career as a poet stretches over four decades. In 2016 she was awarded the Queen's Gold Medal for Poetry. The poet discusses and reads from her new collection, Wake.

Presenter Samira Ahmed

Producer Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Presenter
Samira Ahmed
Interviewed Guest
Tom Dyckhoff
Interviewed Guest
Barney Norris
Interviewed Guest
Sarah Hall
Interviewed Guest
Gillian Allnutt
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

Brand

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Front Row

Orla Kiely, British Asian theatre, Belinda Bauer

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Designer Orla Kiely on her famous Stem graphics.

Designer Orla Kiely on her new exhibition, crime novelist Belinda Bauer discusses her new novel Snap, Sudha Bhuchar and Prav MJ consider British South Asian theatre.

Designer Orla Kiely is famous for her distinct Stem-patterned bags and a global brand that includes fashion, accessories and homeware. Now the first exhibition dedicated to her opens at the Fashion and Textile Museum in London. She discusses the origins of her work at a kitchen table in Ireland and why she thinks that pattern can make you happy without even noticing.

Crime novelist Belinda Bauer talks about her new novel Snap. Based loosely on the real-life murder of Marie Wilks in 1988, it begins with three children left at the side of the road in a broken-down car as their mother goes to find an emergency telephone. Twice winner of the Crime Novelist of the Year, Belinda considers the importance of childhood memory, landscape and the ordinary fears that haunt us in her writing.

What is the identity of British South Asian theatre today? As the Royal Court Theatre holds a series of evenings celebrating the canon of British South Asian theatre going back 50 years, theatre directors Sudha Bhuchar and Prav MJ consider the importance of that legacy, how you preserve and honour the past while looking at the future, and how the preoccupations of South Asian theatre makers has changed in the last 50 years.

Credits

Presenter
Shahidha Bari
Producer
Jerome Weatherald
Interviewed Guest
Orla Kiely
Interviewed Guest
Belinda Bauer
Interviewed Guest
Sudha Bhuchar
Interviewed Guest
Prav MJ

Brand

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Front Row

Joel Meyerowitz, The Girl on the Train on stage, the Famous Women Dinner Service

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Photographer Joel Meyerowitz, and a review of The Girl on the Train on stage.

Veteran photographer Joel Meyerowitz, The Girl on the Train at the West Yorkshire Playhouse, Vanessa Bell and Duncan Grant's Famous Women Dinner Service, and Hugh Grant's career.

As he celebrates his 80th birthday, photographer Joel Meyerowitz looks back at his career which is the focus of his new book of photos, Where I Find Myself. It features his early work as a street photographer in New York in the '60s, his images of Ground Zero immediately after the 9/11 attacks, and his most recent still lifes in Tuscany.

In a unique commission to open the 2018 Charleston Festival, novelist Ali Smith will be performing a piece of creative prose inspired by the Famous Women Dinner Service, a work of 50 ceramic plates featuring the portraits of historical female figures, produced by Vanessa Bell and Duncan Grant in 1932. Kirsty discusses the significance and the artistry of the dinner service with Ali Smith, Darren Clarke, curator at Charleston, and art dealer Robert Travers.

The Girl on the Train, the psychological thriller by Paula Hawkins, became an overnight bestseller and was later adapted into a film starring Emily Blunt as the troubled Rachel who wakes up with a hangover and an uneasy feeling she's seen something she shouldn't have seen. Now it has been adapted for the stage and opens at the West Yorkshire Playhouse in Leeds with Jill Halfpenny as Rachel. Theatre Critic Nick Ahad has been to see it.

As Hugh Grant stars as the disgraced MP Jeremy Thorpe in the BBC drama A Very English Scandal, TV critic Emma Bullimore charts the evolution of Hugh Grant's career, from romcoms to recent darker roles.

Presenter Kirsty Lang

Producer Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Presenter
Kirsty Lang
Interviewed Guest
Joel Meyerowitz
Interviewed Guest
Ali Smith
Interviewed Guest
Darren Clarke
Interviewed Guest
Robert Travers
Interviewed Guest
Nick Ahad
Interviewed Guest
Emma Bullimore
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

Brand

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Front Row

On Chesil Beach with Ian McEwan, Older people and the arts, Drew McOnie

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Ian McEwan on bringing his novel On Chesil Beach to the big screen.

Novelist Ian McEwan on adapting On Chesil Beach for the cinema, older people and the arts and Strictly Ballroom's director and choreographer, Drew McOnie.

Ian McEwan discusses the process of adapting his novel On Chesil Beach for the big screen. Set in 1962, it tells the story of two young newlyweds spending their honeymoon preoccupied with - and terrified by - the forthcoming consummation of their marriage.

Drew McOnie talks about directing and choreographing the first UK staging of Strictly Ballroom: The Musical, based on the much-loved 1992 Baz Luhrmann film that led to a resurgence of ballroom dancing in popular culture.

A recent DCMS survey shows that over-65s are increasingly engaged in the arts. Two members of the Elders Theatre Company at the Royal Exchange in Manchester talk about how they not only go to more events since retiring but are actively participating in the arts. And David Cutler of the funding organisation the Baring Foundation and David Slater of arts company Entelechy discuss the benefits of an interest in the arts for older people.

Presenter Stig Abell

Producer Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Presenter
Stig Abell
Interviewed Guest
Ian McEwan
Interviewed Guest
Drew McOnie
Interviewed Guest
David Cutler
Interviewed Guest
David Slater
Producer
Jerome Weatherald
Interviewed Guest
Gordon Emerson
Interviewed Guest
Christine Connor

Brand

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Front Row

David Shrigley, Madeline Miller, the Power of Netflix

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Artist David Shrigley on his Brighton Festival, Novelist Madeline Miller.

Artist David Shrigley on being guest director of this year's Brighton Festival, the power of Netflix and novelist Madeline Miller.

Graphic artist David Shrigley discusses his role as Guest Director of the Brighton Festival 2018, and his new book Fully Coherent Plan for a New and Better Society.

Madeline Miller won the Orange Prize for Fiction with her debut The Song of Achilles, which told the story of a love affair between Achilles and Patroclus. Her latest novel continues the Greek theme with the story of the first witch in Western literature, Circe, daughter of Helios, who is scorned and rejected by her kin. She discusses what inspired her to take up her story.

The Cannes film festival starts next week, but it's being boycotted by Netflix, one of the world's most powerful entertainment companies. Netflix has been accused of cultural imperialism and Cannes of living in the past. Boyd Hilton and Simon Usborne consider the significance of this turn of events.

Presenter Kirsty Lang

Producer Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Presenter
Kirsty Lang
Interviewed Guest
David Shrigley
Interviewed Guest
Madeline Miller
Interviewed Guest
Boyd Hilton
Interviewed Guest
Simon Usborne
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

Brand

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Front Row

The Marvel Universe, Libraries today, Kizzy Crawford and Gwilym Simcock

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Avengers: Infinity War - the latest offering from Marvel - and the role of libraries today

Superheroes assemble in Marvel's latest, Avengers: Infinity War, the role of libraries with Salley Vickers and Mik Scarlet, plus musicians Kizzy Crawford and Gwilym Simcock.

Avengers: Infinity War is released in cinemas today. Fans have been counting the days until the film's release, but what does this ambitious high-budget offering reveal about the state of the hugely successful Marvel Cinematic Universe? Mik Scarlet and Larushka Ivan-Zadeh consider the bigger picture.

At a time when many libraries across the UK are facing an uncertain future, Salley Vickers has gone back to the 1950s for her new novel The Librarian. Salley, and Peter Gaw who runs Nottinghamshire's libraries, consider how the role of the library has changed and adapted to a modern world, and the challenge they face today.

Two Welsh musicians - singer Kizzy Crawford and pianist and composer Gwilym Simcock - perform from their new album Cân Yr Adar, or Birdsong. They talk about their collaboration, which also involves Sinfonia Cymru, and how they were inspired by the landscape and wildlife of Carngafallt, the nature reserve in mid-Wales, known as the Celtic rainforest.

Presenter Stig Abell

Producer Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Presenter
Stig Abell
Interviewed Guest
Mik Scarlet
Interviewed Guest
Larushka Ivan-Zadeh
Interviewed Guest
Salley Vickers
Interviewed Guest
Peter Gaw
Interviewed Guest
Kizzy Crawford
Interviewed Guest
Gwilym Simcock
Performer
Kizzy Crawford
Performer
Gwilym Simcock
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

Brand

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Front Row

The royals on TV, Luke Evans, Stabat Mater at the Sistine Chapel

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Director Jane Treays discusses her TV documentary The Queen's Green Planet.

The royals on TV, Luke Evans on The Alienist, and James MacMillan and Harry Christophers discuss their live stream of Stabat Mater from the Sistine Chapel.

Following last night's broadcast of The Queen's Green Planet on ITV, which features the Queen in intimate conversation with Sir David Attenborough, we talk to the documentary's director Jane Treays about working with the Queen and look back over the history of royal TV projects with critic Chris Dunkley.

Luke Evans has featured in many Hollywood films including The Girl on the Train, Fast & Furious, the Hobbit franchise and last year as Gaston in Disney's live-action remake of Beauty and the Beast. The Welsh actor discusses his new Netflix series The Alienist, in which he plays a newspaper illustrator who teams up with a criminal psychologist to catch a serial killer in 1890s New York.

Composer Sir James MacMillan's choral work Stabat Mater will make history on 22 April, when it becomes the first work to be video-streamed live from the Sistine Chapel in the Vatican. It will be performed by The Sixteen and Britten Sinfonia under conductor Harry Christophers. MacMillan and Christophers discuss the challenges of performing in this revered venue.

Presenter Kirsty Lang

Producer Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Presenter
Kirsty Lang
Interviewed Guest
Jane Treays
Interviewed Guest
Luke Evans
Interviewed Guest
James MacMillan
Interviewed Guest
Harry Christophers
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

Brand

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Nottingham: Rebel City

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Sandeep Mahal explores the art and culture of Nottingham, the 'rebel city'.

With the decline of manufacturing and the rise of the city as a cultural and creative centre, Sandeep Mahal explores the art and culture of Nottingham today.

Ever since the legendary heroic outlaw Robin Hood first stole from the rich to give to the poor, Nottingham has had a tradition of political defiance, addressing social injustice and encouraging free expression. Sandeep Mahal, Director of Nottingham UNESCO City of Literature, assesses to what extent that still holds today in the city's rich cultural landscape, and talks to writers, poets, singers and actors about the challenges Nottingham has faced over the years.

Samantha Morton discusses her time as a teenager at the city's celebrated Television Workshop, where Jack O'Connell and Vicky McClure also started their acting careers, as well as a number of young, promising hopefuls often seen in the Nottingham films of director Shane Meadows.

Presenter: Sandeep Mahal

Producer: Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Presenter
Sandeep Mahal
Interviewed Guest
Samantha Morton
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

Brand

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Front Row

Anna Chancellor, Harshdeep Kaur, Hilton Als

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Anna Chancellor on her new TV drama, Ordeal by Innocence, and singer Harshdeep Kaur.

Arts news, interviews and reviews. Anna Chancellor on Agatha Christie, singer Harshdeep Kaur and US Pulitzer Prize-winning theatre critic Hilton Als on his new memoir White Girls.

Anna Chancellor stars in the new TV adaptation of Agatha Christie's murder mystery Ordeal By Innocence this weekend, in which she plays Rachel Argyll, heiress, philanthropist and mother of five adopted children found murdered on Christmas Eve. Samira talks to the actress, who is well-known for her roles in Four Weddings and a Funeral, The Hour, Spooks and Mapp & Lucia.

Harshdeep Kaur, the popular Indian playback singer known for her Bollywood Hindi, Punjabi and Sufi songs, performs live. Popularly known as the 'Queen of Sufi', she'll be performing her soulful Sufi renditions alongside a range of more modern Bollywood classics at the Barbican in London this week.

American theatre critic Hilton Als won the Pulitzer Prize last year for his theatre reviews which the judges said puts drama 'within a real-world cultural context, particularly the shifting landscape of gender, sexuality and race.' He talks about White Girls, his new collection of essays, which blurs the line between criticism and memoir, fiction and nonfiction.

Presenter Samira Ahmed

Producer Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Presenter
Samira Ahmed
Interviewed Guest
Anna Chancellor
Interviewed Guest
Hilton Als
Performer
Harshdeep Kaur
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

Brand

Front Row

Front Row

Tom Jones and Jennifer Hudson on The Voice, Art galleries on screen

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Tom Jones and Jennifer Hudson discuss their role as judges on the TV talent show The Voice

Tom Jones and Jennifer Hudson on The Voice, modern art galleries in film and words from TV and film that are now commonly used in everyday language.

Sir Tom Jones and Jennifer Hudson discuss mentoring the competitors in the TV talent show The Voice, how they coach their protégés and where the value of knockout singing competitions lies. Kirsty visits rehearsals at the studios of the television show and talks to the two judges.

As The Square, a satire on modern art galleries hits cinemas, we consider the portrayal of the art gallery in film with Briony Hanson, Head of Film at British Council, and art critic Jacky Klein who also works at Tate.

As 'embiggen', a word coined by The Simpsons, makes its way into the dictionary, lexicographer Susie Dent traces the way words hop from the screen into people's conversations and their impact on our language.

Presenter Kirsty Lang

Producer Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Presenter
Kirsty Lang
Interviewed Guest
Tom Jones
Interviewed Guest
Jennifer Hudson
Interviewed Guest
Briony Hanson
Interviewed Guest
Jacky Klein
Interviewed Guest
Susie Dent
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

Brand

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Front Row

Mary Magdalene, Icelandic fiction, Joseph Morpurgo, Stephen Hawking in culture

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

A review of film Mary Magdalene, and the rich world of Icelandic fiction.

A review of film Mary Magdalene, a discussion on the state of Icelandic fiction, Joseph Morpurgo on his new one-man show, Hammerhead, and Stephen Hawking in popular culture.

Mary Magdalene was Jesus Christ's most loyal friend, who stayed with him through the ordeal of his crucifixion, and was the first witness to his resurrection. But she was also denigrated by the church as a prostitute. Now her story is told in a new film with Rooney Mara as Mary and Joaquin Phoenix as Christ. Michèle Roberts, who wrote the novel The Secret Gospel of Mary Magdalene, reviews.

With its population of 300,000, Iceland has more books published, and more writers per head, than anywhere else in the world. As it becomes a leader in Nordic Noir, crime writer Ragnar Jónasson and professor of Icelandic, Helga Lúthersdóttir, discuss the rich world of Icelandic fiction from the sagas which date back to the 13th century to the present day.

Joseph Morpurgo's show Hammerhead strangely begins after his show has ended. It is the question-and-answer session after an - imagined - 9-hour, one-man performance of Frankenstein. He talks to Stig Abell about this conceit and where it leads him.

And with news of the death of the theoretical physicist Stephen Hawking, we consider his presence in popular culture, and in particular playing himself on TV.

Credits

Presenter
Stig Abell
Producer
Jerome Weatherald
Interviewed Guest
Michele Roberts
Interviewed Guest
Ragnar Jonasson
Interviewed Guest
Helga Luthersdottir
Interviewed Guest
Joseph Morpurgo

Brand

Front Row

Front Row

I, Tonya; Robin Cousins on the art of ice skating; Jess Kidd

BBC Radio 4
BBC Radio 4 logo
30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

I, Tonya reviewed, plus Robin Cousins considers the art and the sport of ice skating.

A review of the biopic I, Tonya, Robin Cousins in discussion on how much ice skating is an art or a sport, novelist Jess Kidd on The Hoarder and two new BBC African services.

I, Tonya is a new biopic about figure skater Tonya Harding, who was known as the bad girl of the ice rink. The film stars Margot Robbie and Allison Janney who've won a Golden Globe and a BAFTA respectively for their performances. Briony Hanson reviews.

With the Winter Olympics in full swing we ask 'is figure skating a sport or an art'? Robin Cousins, former Olympic champion and current commentator at the figure skating at the Games in Pyeongchang, and Debra Craine, dance critic of The Times, discuss how ice dancing relates to more classical forms of dance on terra firma.

Jess Kidd won the Costa Short Story Award in 2016 and that year published her debut novel Himself to critical acclaim. She discusses her new novel The Hoarder about a care worker and her relationship with the belligerent Cathal Flood and the junk-filled house he inhabits.

Yesterday the BBC launched two new African language services, bringing the news, and telling stories in Yoruba and Igbo. Wole Soyinka, the first African to win the Nobel Prize in Literature, is Yoruba; Chinua Achebe, author of arguably the most famous African novel, Things Fall Apart, was Igbo. The editors of the new services discuss the importance of Yoruba and Igbo art and culture today.

Presenter Samira Ahmed

Producer Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Presenter
Samira Ahmed
Interviewed Guest
Briony Hanson
Interviewed Guest
Robin Cousins
Interviewed Guest
Debra Craine
Interviewed Guest
Jess Kidd
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

Brand

Front Row

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