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Alistair McGowan as Jimmy Savile, Amitav Ghosh, Richard Dadd

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:

Alistair McGowan as Jimmy Savile, Amitav Ghosh, Richard Dadd and Bayreuth feud.

Presented by Kirsty Lang. Alistair McGowan discusses playing Jimmy Savile, Amitav Ghosh on his novel Flood of Fire, Richard Dadd's exhibition reviewed and trouble at Bayreuth.

Alistair McGowan plays the role of Jimmy Savile in a controversial new play by Jonathan Maitland which opened last night. McGowan and Maitland discuss their mixed feelings about the project and how and why they chose to portray the serial paedophile.

The novelist Amitav Ghosh talks about the final part of his Ibis Trilogy, Flood of Fire, which follows the Man Booker Prize-shortlisted Sea of Poppies and River of Smoke, set during the turbulent times of the Opium Wars.

A new exhibition by the Victorian artist Richard Dadd shows paintings from his early career, when he was seen as one of the most talented and promising artists of his generation, to paintings completed after he suffered a breakdown and was admitted to Bethlem psychiatric Hospital. Historian Kathryn Hughes reviews.

As Wagner's German opera house Bayreuth prepares for the 150th anniversary performance of Tristan and Isolde, music critic and writer Norman Lebrecht considers the almighty row that is taking place between Wagner's two great-grand-daughters who run the festival.

Presenter Kirsty Lang

Producer Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Presenter
Kirsty Lang
Interviewed Guest
Alistair McGowan
Interviewed Guest
Jonathan Maitland
Interviewed Guest
Amitav Ghosh
Interviewed Guest
Kathryn Hughes
Interviewed Guest
Norman Lebrecht
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

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Eddie Redmayne and Felicity Jones; Renee Fleming; Billie Whitelaw remembered

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Eddie Redmayne and Felicity Jones on The Theory of Everything.

Eddie Redmayne and Felicity Jones on The Theory of Everything, soprano Renee Fleming on her new album, Billie Whitelaw remembered, and the dark side of Christmas films.

Eddie Redmayne and Felicity Jones talk to John Wilson about their new film The Theory of Everything about the physicist Stephen Hawking; soprano Renée Fleming on her new album Christmas in New York; Billie Whitelaw remembered by former theatre critic Benedict Nightingale; and Adam Smith considers the dark side of Christmas films.

Producer Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Presenter
John Wilson
Interviewed Guest
Eddie Redmayne
Interviewed Guest
Felicity Jones
Interviewed Guest
Renee Fleming
Interviewed Guest
Adam Smith
Interviewed Guest
Benedict Nightingale
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

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Tom Hanks, Sir Simon Rattle, French heritage funding

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Tom Hanks on his new film, The Post, co-starring Meryl Streep.

Tom Hanks discusses his new film, The Post, directed by Steven Spielberg, French heritage lottery funding and Simon Rattle on conducting the rarely performed The Genesis Suite.

Tom Hanks discusses his new film The Post, co-starring Meryl Streep and directed by Steven Spielberg, which tells the story of the part The Washington Post played in publishing the top secret Pentagon Papers that changed American public opinion about the Vietnam War.

Sir Simon Rattle is conducting the European concert premiere of The Genesis Suite, a work with narration based on stories from the first book of the Bible, such as Adam and Eve, the Flood and the Tower of Babel. The conductor discusses the little-known piece from 1945 which was written by seven different European composers, émigrés to America, including Schoenberg, Stravinsky and Milhaud, who each composed a movement.

The French culture minister Françoise Nyssen has unveiled plans to launch a heritage lottery. The money will go towards restoring ancient monuments. It follows reports of a fall in lottery receipts in the UK. French journalist Agnes Poirier and cultural historian Robert Hewison discuss the proposal, and consider how far arts and heritage funding should be lottery-dependent.

Presenter Kirsty Lang

Producer Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Presenter
Kirsty Lang
Interviewed Guest
Tom Hanks
Interviewed Guest
Sir Simon Rattle
Interviewed Guest
Agnes Poirier
Interviewed Guest
Robert Hewison
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

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Johnny Depp and Paul Bettany, Imogen Cooper, Kate Saunders, Fortitude

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Arts news with Kirsty Lang, including Johnny Depp and Paul Bettany on new film Mortdecai.

Johnny Depp and Paul Bettany on new film Mortdecai; pianist Imogen Cooper; Kate Saunders discusses her Costa Children's Book award-winner; Fortitude starring Sofie Gråbøl reviewed.

Johnny Depp and Paul Bettany discuss their new film Mortdecai, a slapstick art heist caper set amongst the British aristocracy.

Sofie Gråbøl, star of The Killing, returns to the small screen in Fortitude. Gråbøl's first British drama series focuses on a small community in the Arctic Circle where a murder has been committed. Novelist Tom Harper reviews.

Pianist Imogen Cooper discusses her new album on which she performs works by the husband-and-wife team of Robert and Clara Shumann, based on the letters they exchanged during their courtship.

Costa Children's Book Award winner Kate Saunders discusses Five Children on the Western Front, her update of E Nesbit's Five Children and It stories, which transports the children to 1914 and imagines their fortunes at war.

Presenter Kirsty Lang

Producer Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Presenter
Kirsty Lang
Interviewed Guest
Johnny Depp
Interviewed Guest
Paul Bettany
Interviewed Guest
Tom Harper
Interviewed Guest
Imogen Cooper
Interviewed Guest
Kate Saunders
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

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Lee Evans, White House Down, Man Booker shortlist

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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John Wilson with news of the shortlist for the Man Booker Prize for fiction.

Arts news with John Wilson, including comedian Lee Evans on his return to the theatre in Essex, new film White House Down, and the shortlist for the Man Booker Prize for fiction.

With John Wilson.

Comedian Lee Evans returns to stage in Barking in Essex, the last play written by screenwriter Clive Exton (Entertaining Mr Sloane, 10 Rillington Place, Jeeves and Wooster) before his death in 2007. The play centres on a dysfunctional criminal family from Essex and co-stars Sheila Hancock and Keeley Hawes. Lee Evans discusses swearing, Samuel Beckett, and the plumber providing inspiration for his forthcoming tour.

Roland Emmerich, director of disaster movies Independence Day and The Day After Tomorrow, is about to release his latest, White House Down, in which a heavily-armed group of paramilitary invaders target the President of the United States. Kate Muir reviews.

The shortlist for the Man Booker Prize for fiction was announced today. Contenders for the £50,000 prize are Jim Crace, Colm Toibin, Eleanor Catton, Jhumpa Lahiri, NoViolet Bulawayo and Ruth Ozeki. Chair of judges Robert Macfarlane and judge Natalie Haynes discuss their selection. The winner is announced on 15 October.

Producer Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Presenter
John Wilson
Interviewed Guest
Lee Evans
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

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John Hurt's paintings, The Fool in King Lear, Summer reads for the UK

BBC Radio 4
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John Hurt as Artist, and the role of the Fool in King Lear.

Sir John Hurt's widow Anwen on the late actor's paintings and drawings; the role of the Fool in King Lear; and recommendations for summer reading for those holidaying in the UK.

John Hurt as Artist is a new exhibition in Norfolk which reveals a less well-known side of the actor who died last year. Sir John Hurt's widow Anwen discusses the mainly figurative paintings and drawings which mostly relate to the actor's off-screen life, but also include self-portraits of him in prosthetic make-up for his role as John Merrick in The Elephant Man from 1980.

Ian McKellen is playing King Lear in the West End and recently Anthony Hopkins played him on television. Accompanying Lear on his bleak and tragic journey is his Fool. Karl Johnson, Fool to Anthony Hopkins' Lear, and Lloyd Hutchinson, McKellen's Fool, discuss the way they approach this enigmatic figure.

Recently we've been offering inspiration on holiday reading to help you choose which books to cram into your suitcase. Today New Statesman book critic Sarah Ditum concludes the series with a set of recommendations for people holidaying closer to home, in the UK and Ireland.

Presenter Kirsty Lang

Producer Jerome Weatherald.

Main image: Sir John Hurt printmaking. Credit: Andi Sapey

Credits

Presenter
Kirsty Lang
Interviewed Guest
Anwen Hurt
Interviewed Guest
Karl Johnson
Interviewed Guest
Lloyd Hutchinson
Interviewed Guest
Sarah Ditum
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

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Sacha Baron Cohen's Who Is America?, Glasgow School of Art Rebuild, Anita Corbin, China's Most Expensive Film Flops

BBC Radio 4
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The verdict on Sacha Baron Cohen's new TV series and rebuilding the Glasgow School of Art.

Who Is America? - Sacha Baron Cohen's new TV series reviewed. The latest update on rebuilding the Glasgow School of Art. And photographer Anita Corbin on her First Women project.

Sacha Baron Cohen's return to TV is Who Is America?, a new series in which he dupes figures such as Sarah Palin and Bernie Sanders into giving interviews to him, heavily disguised with prosthetics. TV critic Boyd Hilton reviews.

As the decision is taken to rebuild the Glasgow School of Art after its second devastating fire, Sally Stewart, Head of Architecture at the school, discusses the latest plans for the celebrated Charles Rennie Mackintosh masterpiece.

Photographer Anita Corbin discusses her latest project, First Women, a series of portraits of 100 women who have broken barriers in areas including sport, law, and the military, to become the first of their gender to achieve their positions.

After he was stopped from photographing a work by Rembrandt this afternoon at Scotland's National Galleries - a painting on loan from a museum that allows the public to take photographs of the painting freely - art historian Bendor Grosvenor discusses the ethics of taking photographs in art exhibitions.

The Chinese fantasy epic, Asura, with special effects made in Hollywood and starring China's most popular stars, cost 112 million dollars to make and was eagerly anticipated. But after its opening last weekend China's most expensive film ever has been pulled from cinemas. The BBC's Hong Kong Bureau Chief, Vivian Wu, tells John where it all went wrong.

Presenter John Wilson

Producer Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Presenter
John Wilson
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

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Matthew Bourne on The Red Shoes, Satirising Trump, Marius de Vries

BBC Radio 4
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Matthew Bourne discusses his stage version of the classic British film The Red Shoes.

Matthew Bourne on his stage version of The Red Shoes, musician and producer Marius de Vries discusses working on La La Land, the challenge of satirising Donald Trump.

Dance choreographer and director Matthew Bourne's adaptation of The Red Shoes, inspired by the 1948 Powell and Pressburger film and the fairy-tale by Hans Christian Andersen, opened at Sadler's Wells last night before embarking on a national tour. John Wilson talks to Sir Matthew Bourne about bringing his adaptation to the stage, and the forthcoming year-long programme celebrating the 30th anniversary of Bourne's company, New Adventures.

Bafta-winning music producer and composer Marius de Vries, who has worked extensively in film and contemporary music, talks to John Wilson about his latest role on the hit musical film La La Land, and his involvement in some of the most high-profile artists of the past two decades, including Madonna, Bowie, and U2.

Donald Trump provided plenty of material for comedians when he was running for president, but what effect will the notoriously litigious businessman have on satirists when he is in office? Political comedian Andy Zaltzman, photographer Alison Jackson, and comedy journalist Elise Czajkowski join us to discuss.

Presenter John Wilson

Producer Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Interviewed Guest
Matthew Bourne
Interviewed Guest
Andy Zaltzman
Interviewed Guest
Alison Jackson
Interviewed Guest
Elise Czajkowski
Presenter
John Wilson
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

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Denise Gough, Fairport Convention, Leonardo da Vinci

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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Denise Gough on her TV role in Paula, and 50 years of Fairport Convention.

Denise Gough on the TV role of Paula, 50 years of the British band Fairport Convention, and Martin Kemp on the mystery of Leonardo da Vinci's mother.

Olivier Award-winning actress Denise Gough talks about taking on the title role in the TV drama Paula, and how she wants to help change the types of stories being told about women on the small screen.

On Saturday Fairport Convention will give a concert 50 years to the minute since their very first. Founding member Simon Nicol, and newcomer Dave Pegg - he joined in 1969 - talk about the early days of the band that launched the careers of Sandy Denny, Richard Thompson and Ashley Hutchings, and discuss their latest album 50:50@50.

The identity of Leonardo da Vinci's mother has remained a mystery - long after the identity of his most famous painting, the Mona Lisa, was finally discovered - until now. Previously there have been several theories and a possible first name of Caterina, but nearly six centuries on, Martin Kemp - one of the leading authorities on da Vinci - says he can now reveal who Leonardo's mother was, and argues that it is time to finally cut through the myths that still surround the Mona Lisa and Da Vinci himself.

Presenter John Wilson

Producer Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Presenter
John Wilson
Producer
Jerome Weatherald
Interviewed Guest
Denise Gough
Interviewed Guest
Simon Nicol
Interviewed Guest
Dave Pegg
Interviewed Guest
Martin Kemp

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Rupert Everett, Abir Mukherjee, Sex and the City 20 years on

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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Rupert Everett on writing, directing and playing Oscar Wilde in The Happy Prince.

Rupert Everett disusses playing Oscar Wilde in The Happy Prince; novelist Abir Mukherjee on his latest, Smoke and Ashes; Sex and the City, 20 years on; and the late Mary Wilson.

Rupert Everett discusses his life-long passion for Oscar Wilde as he directs, writes and stars in his film The Happy Prince. Framed around Wilde's short story of the same name, the bio-pic focuses on Wilde at the end of his life, from his release from prison to his death in poverty in Paris three years later.

Abir Mukherjee's creation of detective Sam Wyndham, a British officer who finds himself in Calcutta in the 1920s, and his sidekick 'Surrender-Not' Bannerjee, won him a £10,000 publishing deal. He discusses the third book in the series, Smoke and Ashes, set against the backdrop of non-violent protest and increasing demands for Indian independence.

Twenty years ago this week Sex and the City launched in America on the HBO channel. To mark the anniversary, TV critic Emma Bullimore pours herself a Cosmopolitan and looks back at her favourite show...

Mary Wilson, who died yesterday at the age of 102, was in the public eye as the wife of the former Prime Minister Harold Wilson. She was lampooned in Mrs Wilson's Diary in Private Eye as a suburban down-to-earth middle class housewife. She was, though, something much rarer - a very popular poet. From the archive we hear her talking about her writing, the public response, and one of her poems.

Presenter Samira Ahmed

Producer Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Presenter
Samira Ahmed
Interviewed Guest
Rupert Everett
Interviewed Guest
Abir Mukherjee
Interviewed Guest
Emma Bullimore
Interviewed Guest
Mary Wilson
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

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Frida Kahlo, Fly by Night, Queer Eye, Cats in literature

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:

The new Frida Kahlo exhibition Making Her Self Up at the V&A and Queer Eye on TV.

Mexican artist Frida Kahlo in a major new exhibition. Plus the presence of cats in literature, from Keats to TS Eliot, 1500 pigeons create a work of art and Queer Eye on TV.

The V&A's latest exhibition includes 13 artworks by the Mexican painter Frida Kahlo, but far more of her colourful skirts, blouses and pieces of jewellery because Frida Kahlo: Making Her Self Up concentrates on Kahlo's greatest creation - the artist herself. Design critic Corinne Julius considers what it reveals about the famous modern Latin American artist and our attitude to her.

When we think of John Keats, we mostly think of Odes, Grecian Urns, Nightingales, and Autumn - we certainly don't think of cats. 200 years after Keats wrote his little-known comic gem To Mrs Reynolds's Cat, we consider the place of cats in literature - from Hemingway to Colette, and Stephen King to Tove Janssen. Cat-lover and writer Lynne Truss and literary historian John Bowen consider the relationship between writers and their feline 'mewses' and asks what makes a 'purr-fect' piece of cat prose?

1500 pigeons with small LED lights attached to their legs representing the messages they would once have carried over the battlefields of the First World War are the latest work by the American artist Duke Riley, who brings his performance piece Fly by Night to the UK for the first time. The work's co-ordinator Kitty Joe describes the event.

As the second series of Queer Eye launches on Netflix, writer Louis Wise assesses the show's popularity.

Presenter Stig Abell

Producer Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Presenter
Stig Abel
Interviewed Guest
Corinne Julius
Interviewed Guest
Lynne Truss
Interviewed Guest
John Bowen
Interviewed Guest
Kitty Joe
Interviewed Guest
Louis Wise
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

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Lee Miller and Surrealism in Britain, GLOW star Kate Nash, Pop-up arts

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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Singer and GLOW star Kate Nash, and model-turned-photographer Lee Miller and Surrealism.

Lee Miller and Surrealism in Britain at the Hepworth Wakefield, English singer Kate Nash on her role in the wrestling TV drama GLOW, and pop-up arts in the UK.

The American photographer and former model Lee Miller had a leading role in championing Surrealism in Britain in the 1930s, which is the focus of a new exhibition at the Hepworth Wakefield. The show's curator Lauren Barnes, and Lee Miller's son Antony Penrose, consider her fascination for Surrealism and the artists involved, including Man Ray, Max Ernst and Salvador Dalí.

Singer Kate Nash discusses dealing with fame after the success of her debut album Made of Bricks and the mega hit single Foundations. She explains how learning to wrestle for her role in Netflix comedy GLOW rebuilt her confidence and how her new album, Yesterday Was Forever, was inspired by her teenage diary.

Pop-up restaurants, which appear in empty shops and car parks, have enlivened our food culture, and even had a rejuvenating impact on neighbourhoods. There are also pop-up galleries, music performance spaces and even, in York, a whole pop-up Shakespeare theatre and village. Cat Gardiner who has run pop-up galleries in Cardiff, the musician Sam Lee who is taking concerts out of buildings and putting them around campfires, and James Cundall, the man behind Shakespeare's Rose Theatre in York, discuss the impact of arts pop-ups.

Credits

Presenter
Stig Abell
Producer
Jerome Weatherald
Interviewed Guest
Kate Nash
Interviewed Guest
Cat Gardiner
Interviewed Guest
Sam Lee
Interviewed Guest
James Cundall
Interviewed Guest
Lauren Barnes
Interviewed Guest
Antony Penrose

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Conductor Marin Alsop, Philip French, Jean Seberg, returning TV series

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Mark Lawson interviews Marin Alsop, the first woman to conduct the Last Night of the Proms

Marin Alsop, the first woman to conduct the Last Night of the Proms, film critic Philip French on retiring after 50 years, the life of actress Jean Seberg, and returning TV series.

With Mark Lawson.

American conductor Marin Alsop discusses becoming the first woman to conduct the Last Night of the Proms. She also reflects on toying with the idea of conducting with one hand after injuring her wrist, and falling in love with Leonard Bernstein at the age of nine.

As Philip French puts away his pen after being The Observer's film critic for 50 years, coinciding with his 80th birthday today, he discusses the 2,500 films he has watched and the changes he has seen in cinema in that time.

As Bonjour Tristesse is re-released in cinemas, the tragic life of actress Jean Seberg is re-assessed by her biographer Garry McGee. The star of A Bout De Souffle and Saint Joan was a political activist and supporter of the Black Panther movement and became the subject of an investigation by the FBI. She committed suicide in 1979, after her film career had faded away amid bad press and conspiracy theories.

American drama series The Newsroom, created by Aaron Sorkin (The West Wing, The Social Network), returns to our TV screens this week for a second series, and Bad Education, a comedy written by and starring Jack Whitehall, also begins its second run. TV critic Chris Dunkley considers different ways to approach the potentially tricky second series.

Producer Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Presenter
Mark Lawson
Interviewed Guest
Marin Alsop
Interviewed Guest
Philip French
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

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Rob Brydon on Swimming With Men, Laura Wade, Ferens Art Gallery

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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Rob Brydon on the set of film Swimming With Men, playwright Laura Wade, Claude Lanzmann.

On the set of Swimming With Men with Rob Brydon and Daniel Mays, Laura Wade, writer of Home, I'm Darling, final report on Art Fund Museum of the Year from Ferens Art Gallery, Hull.

Rob Brydon, Daniel Mays and Adeel Akhtar were among the actors spending long hours in swimming pools last summer rehearsing for, and shooting, the new British film Swimming With Men, based on a true story about a group of male synchronised swimmers competing in the world championships. Stig Abell reports from the set at Basildon swimming pool, which was masquerading as Milan, the venue for the finals.

Laura Wade, the playwright behind Posh and the stage adaption of Tipping the Velvet, discusses Home, I'm Darling, her new a play about a modern couple trying emulate the happy domesticity of the 1950s.

With the announcement of the winner of the £100,000 Art Fund Museum of the Year 2018 later this evening, we have our final report from the five finalists. So far we've heard from Brooklands Museum in Weybridge, Glasgow Women's Library, The Postal Museum in London, and Tate St Ives. Tonight we visit Ferens Art Gallery in Hull, which was at the heart of Hull UK City of Culture last year.

Filmmaker and writer Claude Lanzmann, famous for Shoah - his 1985 epic exploration of the Holocaust, has died. He's remembered by the writer and cultural critic Agnes Poirier.

Presenter Stig Abell

Producer Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Presenter
Stig Abell
Interviewed Guest
Rob Brydon
Interviewed Guest
Daniel Mays
Interviewed Guest
Adeel Akhtar
Interviewed Guest
Laura Wade
Interviewed Guest
Agnes Poirier
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

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Westminster Abbey, The culture of the countryside, Gillian Allnutt

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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A visit to the Queen's Diamond Jubilee Galleries at Westminster Abbey.

Tom Dyckhoff assesses the £23m Weston Tower and the Queen's Diamond Jubilee Galleries at Westminster Abbey. Plus the appeal of the countryside to writers and poet Gillian Allnutt.

The £23m Weston Tower and the Queen's Diamond Jubilee Galleries at Westminster Abbey will be opening to the public next month. Architecture critic and historian Tom Dyckhoff gives his response to these two new additions to the abbey church, the site of all royal coronations since William the Conqueror in 1066.

Why are so many British writers setting their stories in the countryside at the moment? From the second series of the BBC comedy drama This Country, to plays including Barney Norris's Nightfall, Joe White's Mayfly and Simon Longman's Gundog, and novels such as Jon McGregor's Reservoir 13 and Ali Smith's Autumn, writers are turning to a new vision of 'the pastoral' for inspiration. Writer Barney Norris joins novelist Sarah Hall - who was born and raised in the Lake District - to consider whether writing about the countryside has become part of the zeitgeist again and why.

Gillian Allnutt's career as a poet stretches over four decades. In 2016 she was awarded the Queen's Gold Medal for Poetry. The poet discusses and reads from her new collection, Wake.

Presenter Samira Ahmed

Producer Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Presenter
Samira Ahmed
Interviewed Guest
Tom Dyckhoff
Interviewed Guest
Barney Norris
Interviewed Guest
Sarah Hall
Interviewed Guest
Gillian Allnutt
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

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Mark Rylance on Dunkirk, Game of Thrones, best summer reads

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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Mark Rylance discusses his role in Christopher Nolan's new film Dunkirk.

Mark Rylance on his role in the new film Dunkirk; Alex Clark and Rosie Goldsmith give us their pick of the summer reads; Sarah Hughes on the latest Game of Thrones series.

Mark Rylance discusses his role in Christopher Nolan's new film Dunkirk, in which he plays the civilian captain of a small vessel commandeered for the rescue of some of the hundreds of thousands of British and Allied troops stranded on the French beach in 1940 as the enemy closes in.

Critic Alex Clark and broadcaster and literary programmer Rosie Goldsmith give their recommended reads for this summer, including a selection of best books in translation from France, Italy and Russia.

The seventh season of Game of Thrones began this week, and the television series has now overtaken the George RR Martin book series the show is based on. We ask TV critic Sarah Hughes, who has written The Guardian's Game of Thrones Blog since the first season, how she thinks the show will fare without the influence of the books.

Presenter Kirsty Lang

Producer Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Interviewed Guest
Mark Rylance
Interviewed Guest
Alex Clark
Interviewed Guest
Rosie Goldsmith
Interviewed Guest
Sarah Hughes
Presenter
Kirsty Lang
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

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Jack O'Connell; Emma Donoghue's Queer Icon; Diana, Our Mother; Jules Buckley

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Actor Jack O'Connell on playing Brick in Cat on a Hot Tin Roof on the West End stage.

Jack O'Connell on his role in Tennessee Williams's play Cat on a Hot Tin Roof; novelist Emma Donoghue chooses her Queer Icon; conductor Jules Buckley looks ahead to his two Proms.

Jack O'Connell, who starred in the TV series Skins, and on the big screen in Starred Up, '71 and Unbroken, discusses his latest role as Brick in Tennessee Williams's classic play Cat on a Hot Tin Roof.

Tomorrow the conductor Jules Buckley will perform the first of his two BBC Proms 2017. Buckley - who founded The Heritage Orchestra and in 2015 performed The Ibiza Prom in conjunction with Radio 1's Pete Tong - discusses this year's works which will be taking their inspiration from Scott Walker and Charles Mingus.

For our Queer Icons series, best-selling novelist Emma Donoghue champions Patricia Rozema's film, I've Heard the Mermaids Singing.

Plus, Ashley Gething is the producer/director of the much talked about television film Diana, Our Mother: Her Life and Legacy, in which Princes William and Harry give a rare interview about their mother Diana Princess of Wales who died 20 years ago. Ashley explains how the programme came about, and the insight it gives into how the Princes coped with her death.

Presenter: John Wilson

Producer: Jerome Weatherald

(Main Image: Jack O'Connell as Brick in Cat on a Hot Tin Roof. Photographer credit: Johan Persson).

Credits

Interviewed Guest
Jack O'Connell
Interviewed Guest
Jules Buckley
Interviewed Guest
Emma Donoghue
Interviewed Guest
Ashley Gething
Presenter
John Wilson
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

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Vanessa Redgrave, Imperium, French African artefacts, Sally Rooney

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Vanessa Redgrave looks back over her long and varied career, and Imperium at the RSC.

Vanessa Redgrave on receiving the Richard Harris Award; Robert Harris's Cicero trilogy brought to the stage; the repatriation of French African artefacts; Sally Rooney.

Vanessa Redgrave has just been awarded the Richard Harris Award which is given to an actor for their outstanding contribution to British film. She talks to Stig about her long career in cinema and theatre.

Imperium is the Royal Shakespeare Company's new six-hour production which looks at power politics in ancient Rome, which is based on Robert Harris's bestselling Cicero trilogy. The writer and classical historian Natalie Haynes has seen the production and gives her verdict.

French president Emmanuel Macron has called for African artefacts currently held in French museums to be returned to their countries of origin. Cultural historian Andrew Hussey discusses the reaction in France, the practicalities of such a pledge, and what pressure it might put on museums in Britain.

The Irish writer Sally Rooney has just been awarded The 2017 Sunday Times/Peters Fraser + Dunlop Young Writer of the Year Award for Conversations With Friends. The 26-year-old's debut novel has become a critical and word-of-mouth hit this year, acclaimed as fresh and clever. She talks to Stig about the book and what the win means to her.

Presenter Stig Abell

Producer Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Interviewed Guest
Vanessa Redgrave
Interviewed Guest
Natalie Haynes
Interviewed Guest
Andrew Hussey
Interviewed Guest
Sally Rooney
Presenter
Stig Abell
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

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Ute Lemper, Steelworks play We're Still Here, Vasily Petrenko

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Singer Ute Lemper, Welsh play We're Still Here, Russian conductor Vasily Petrenko.

Singer Ute Lemper performs live; a report on the National Theatre of Wales's play We're Still Here; Vasily Petrenko offers his top tips for conducting.

The German cabaret singer Ute Lemper joins Kirsty in the studio to perform from her Last Tango in Berlin series of songs, which features the music of Brecht, Weill, Piaf and Marlene Dietrich.

Kirsty visits Port Talbot where the National Theatre of Wales is staging a new play, We're Still Here, inspired by the threatened closure of the town's steelworks in 2015 and the hundreds of people who lost their jobs. Kirsty talks to the creators Rhiannon White and Evie Manning, and Sam Coombes, the steelworker who has taken a sabbatical to star in the production.

If you've ever wondered what it take to be a great conductor, Vasily Petrenko, winner of the Gramophone Artist of the Year 2017, gives his top tips of dos and don'ts.

Presenter Kirsty Lang

Producer Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Interviewed Guest
Ute Lemper
Interviewed Guest
Rhiannon White
Interviewed Guest
Evie Manning
Interviewed Guest
Sam Coombes
Interviewed Guest
Vasily Petrenko
Presenter
Kirsty Lang
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

Brand

Front Row

Front Row

St Vincent, Andrew Michael Hurley, The Tin Drum, Daljit Nagra

BBC Radio 4
BBC Radio 4 logo
30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

St Vincent on her new album Masseduction, and novelist Andrew Michael Hurley.

St Vincent discusses her new album Masseduction; poet Daljit Nagra on poetry in TV and radio adverts; novelist Andrew Michael Hurley; and Gunter Grass's The Tin Drum on stage.

The American singer St. Vincent, aka Annie Clark, discusses her new album Masseduction.

Andrew Michael Hurley's debut novel The Loney was a runaway success, winning the 2015 Costa Book Award in the First Novel category. The author discusses his follow-up, Devil's Day, which like The Loney is a gothic horror story set in Lancashire.

The Tin Drum by Nobel Laureate Günter Grass centres on Oskar, who refuses to grow from the age of 3 and has a voice that can shatter glass. The Cornwall-based theatre company Kneehigh have adapted the story for the stage and is currently touring the UK. Writer and broadcaster Paul Allen reviews.

Poet Daljit Nagra considers the current fashion for TV and radio adverts to feature poetry.

Presenter Stig Abell

Producer Jerome Weatherald.

Credits

Presenter
Stig Abell
Interviewed Guest
undefined St Vincent
Interviewed Guest
Andrew Hurley
Interviewed Guest
Paul Allen
Interviewed Guest
Daljit Nagra
Producer
Jerome Weatherald

Brand

Front Row

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