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BBC Radio 4
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28 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Combine Disneyland Paris, a 4-track demo and three guys from Glasgow. Et voila, Daft Punk!

It was 1994, and legendary techno duo Slam were booked to play an event in Disneyland Paris. “We had a couple of days to kill, and a friend got in touch to say he knew these two young French musicians who wanted to give us music they’d made.”

The “young French musicians” Thomas Bangalter and Guy-Manuel de Homem-Christo were still in their teens at that point, and Daft Punk was under a year old. Stuart McMillan distinctly remembers hearing their 4-track demo for the first time; “We were blown away!”

Composed of Orde Meikle and Stuart McMillan, Slam launched independent electronic record label Soma in 1991. It had a very DIY ethos. Along with manager Dave Clarke, they’d overseen a number of influential releases. It was Slam’s own track ‘Positive Education’ that piqued Thomas and Guy-Manuel’s interest. They recognised Slam as kindred spirits, and Soma as the label they wanted to launch Daft Punk, and that's when things went really wild.

This is the story of Daft Punk's earliest beginnings on Glasgow's techno scene.

Narration written by Kirstin Innes

Narrated by Kate Dickie

Mixed by Alison Rhynas

Produced by Victoria McArthur

BBC Radio 4
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2 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Wildlife sound recordist Chris Watson presents the jack snipe.

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about the British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Wildlife Sound Recordist, Chris Watson, presents the Jack Snipe. The song of the Jack snipe has been likened to the sound of a distant horse cantering along a road. To hear it though, you need to visit Scandinavian bogs and mires where these small waders breed. When the ice seals their northern breeding areas jack snipes head south and west and many winter in the British Isles.

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for 10 months First broadcast:
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In Whitby, a magician notices strange bite marks on the neck of a woman he has just met.

In Whitby, a magician sees strange bite marks on the neck of a woman he has just met. Stars comedy trio Peepolykus. From 2017.

In 19th-century Whitby, a magician prepares to compete with Harry Houdini at a major international magic convention. When a ship carrying a cargo of fifty coffins runs aground on the town's beach, he suspects Houdini of pulling a huge publicity stunt.

In this second series, the comedy troupe Peepolykus assume the roles of minor characters in great works of fiction and derail the plot of the book through their hapless buffoonery.

Peepolykus (pronounced people-like-us) has exported its brand of irreverent comic theatre to over 100 towns and cities across four continents, often under the auspices of the British Council. The company's varied CV includes two tours of Bangladesh, winning the audience award at the Tehran Arts Festival, performing to royalty in Brunei, to Indian statespeople in the Himalayas, a truly disastrous run in Barbados, an unforgettable stint on The Price is Right in Australia and other occasional bits of telly for the BBC. Their theatre scripts are licensed world wide and their award-winning musical with NYMT:UK is pencilled for re-launch. The company has also played for 3 months in the West End and collaborated with numerous organisations including Neal Street Productions, Aardman, NT, The Kevin Spacey Foundation and currently with Brunel University on Stuck - working with schools to adopt improvisation into the curriculum. Past forays on Radio 4 have included a co-penned series with Rik Mayall, a star-studded adaptation of A Christmas Carol and a live recording of The Hound of the Baskervilles. Peepolykus is produced by Eleanor Lloyd Productions.

Director . . . . . Sasha Yevtushenko

By John Nicholson and Richard Katz

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2017.

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BBC Radio 4
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14 minutes Available for years First broadcast:
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Lucy Catherine's Viking epic of love, revenge and faith continues.

4 Extra Debut. Sigrid is burdened knowing she killed the man who raised her. What will happen if her secret is revealed? Stars Hollie Burgess.

Set in the 11th century, the series follows Gudrun in the New World, and her estranged daughter Sigrid in England. Both mother and daughter have reasons to seek forgiveness as they forge a path through lands of unearthly beauty and uncompromising harshness.

Sigrid has arrived in England to marry a man she has never met. She must keep her darkest secrets well-hidden if she is to survive in this strange land of Saxons and Danes.

Sigrid ..... Hollie Burgess

The Virgin ..... Marilyn Nnadebe

Silvia ..... Susan Jameson

Sailor (Sc2) / Sailors ..... Chris Harper, Joseph Ayre

Gorm ..... David Hounslow

Canute ..... Aaron Gelkoff

Gunnar .... Chris Pavlo

Written by Lucy Catherine.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in May 2019.

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BBC Radio 4
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28 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Journalist Jude Rogers examines how music shapes us from before we are even born.

How does music shape us? Journalist Jude Rogers speaks to musicians, neuroscientists and psychologists about how fundamental music is to our childhood.

When music journalist Jude Rogers lost her father aged five, she turned to songs for solace and structure. Music helped her redefine her identity as a teenager and connect with her young child as a parent after post-natal depression.

In four programmes, Jude speaks to musicians, neuroscientists, psychologists and music-lovers to discover how fundamental music is at each stage of our lives.

In episode 1, Early Life, Jude looks at how music shapes our lives from before we are even born, helping us form connections with the people around us, control our impulses and even become more empathetic.

We hear from Nigerian musician Femi Kuti, music psychologist Dr Samuel Mehr, developmental cognitive neuroscientist Dr Assal Habibi, music therapist and teacher Tiziana Pozzo and 7-year-old pianist Laasya and her father, Jithender.

Producer: Georgia Moodie

A Reduced Listening production for BBC Radio 4

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BBC Radio 4
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23 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Episode 3: Virgil gives tips on bee-keeping and creates Buffy the Vampire Slayer.

Natalie Haynes takes a fresh look at the ancient world: Virgil’s link to Buffy the Vampire Slayer. With Edith Hall. From 2014.

A fresh look at the ancient world.

Natalie Haynes, critic, writer and reformed stand-up comedian, brings the ancient world entertainingly up to date. In each of the four programmes she profiles a figure from ancient Greece or Rome and creates a stand-up routine around them. She then goes in search of the links which make the ancient world still very relevant in the 21st century.

Natalie considers the work of the Roman poet Virgil, ranging from his hints on bee-keeping to his great work The Aeneid. Dido is the classic wronged woman and the Aeneid contains the best ding-dong between a man and a woman in all Latin literature, culminating in Dido’s memorable promise “If you go I’m going to kill myself and then I will pursue you from beyond death with black fires!” Natalie is joined by Pamela Helen Stephen who has sung Dido in Purcell's Dido and Aeneas, bee-keeper Gordon Cutting and Dr Llewelyn Morgan to talk about the greatest poet in the Roman world.

Producer: Christine Hall.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in April 2014.

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for years First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Sitcom about a young woman trying to build a more fulfilling life for herself in Glasgow.

Keen for a more fulfilling life in Glasgow, Josie swears off romance and almost immediately finds a new relationship. From 2016.

Josie swears off romance and almost imediately finds herself in a budding relationship with Darren's former flatmate, Roddy.

Comedy drama from award-winning comedian Josie Long about a young woman trying to build a new, more fulfilling life for herself in Glasgow.

Based on characters from the short films "Romance and Adventure" and "Let's Go Swimming" by Josie Long and Douglas King.

Josie ...... Josie Long

Darren ...... Darren Osborne

Roddy ...... Sanjeev Kohli

Kerry ...... Hatty Ashdown

Eleanor ...... Clare Grogan

Chris ...... Michael Bertenshaw

Janie ...... Georgie Glen

Mona ...... Rebecca Hamilton

Fraser ...... Chris Pavlo

Written by Josie Long

Produced by Colin Anderson

A BBC Radio Comedy production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in April 2016.

Credits

Josie
Josie Long
Writer
Josie Long
Producer
Colin Anderson

Genre

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for years First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Stand-up Mae Martin draws connections between her obsessive patterns of behaviour.

The comedienne draws connections between her obsessive, all-consuming patterns of behaviour and why they might occur. From 2017.

Mae Martin is kicking the habit.

She’s exploring how we as a society think about addiction, and on a personal level, trying to understand who she is now she's no longer addicted to anything.

Through the lens of her own experience, this guide follows Mae chronologically through a lifetime of obsessive behaviour and addiction with all her characteristic wit and levity.

What makes a habit an addiction?

As a young child, Mae may not have been addicted yet, but she was certainly OBSESSED. She's never just "liked" things, she's always loved them. Mae is finally drawing connections between her obsessive, all-consuming patterns of behaviour, and examining why they might occur.

Written by and starring Mae Martin – an award-winning stand-up and Edinburgh comedy award nominee.

With:

Dr Gabor Mate

Carolyn Taylor

Producer: Alexandra Smith

A BBC Studios Production, first broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in November 2017.

Credits

Writer
Mae Martin
Performer
Mae Martin
Producer
Alexandra Smith

Genre

BBC Radio 4
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57 minutes Available for 26 days First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Amanda Khozi Mukwashi preaches at a service, live from St Martin-in-the-Fields.

The Chief Executive of Christian Aid, Amanda Khozi Mukwashi is the preacher at a service for Ascension Day, live from St Martin-in-the-Fields in London.

The Chief Executive of Christian Aid, Amanda Khozi Mukwashi is the preacher at a service for Ascension Day, live from St Martin-in-the-Fields in London. The celebrant at the Eucharist is the vicar, the Rev'd Dr Sam Wells, and the music – provided by St Martin’s Voices – includes Ola Gjeilo's Sunrise Mass, and the Ascensiontide hymns Hail the day that sees him rise, and Crown Him with Many Crowns. They are joined in the church by broadcasters and radio contributors who will lead various parts of the service. Director of Music: Andrew Earis. Producer: Ben Collingwood.

BBC Radio 4
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28 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Bangladesh was born fifty years ago. Qasa Alom with a special programme to mark that date.

Qasa Alom is a young, third generation British Bangladeshi - here he explores the birth of Bangladesh.

Not many people recall the Dominion of Pakistan. It was set up after the British left India in 1947, and there were two territories a thousand miles apart, East and West Pakistan. The only thing connecting them was religion. “We don’t even look the same,” says Qasa Alom, a Birmingham born British Bangladeshi. “They are tall and fair, we are short and darker. My cousin was teased by Pakistanis, who said he smelled of fish.”

The liberation war of 1971 was really nasty. The fighting only ended when India came in on the side of Bangladesh, by when millions had been forced to flee. This year Independence Day - March 26 - marks half a century since the country was born.

“Why wouldn’t I want to make this programme?” says Qasa Alom. “It’s such a massive story, the birth of the seventh most populous nation in the world, my origin country, a place we hardly ever hear about. The stories of Pakistan and of India, they are frequently on the airwaves but Bangladesh has been left out. Even in my own community, my generation seems to know absolutely nothing about the war, the refugees, the genocide. Why is that?"

With contributions from Azmina Siddique and Huma Yusuf, plus members of Qasa's own family including his mum. Qasa Alom hosts the BBC Asian Network's Big Debate and was winner of radio presenter of the year at the Asian media awards 2020.

Producer Miles Warde makes the How to Invent a Country series for Radio 4

Genre

BBC Radio 4
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28 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Gary Younge explores stories of racial passing, through the prism of Nella Larsen's book.

Gary Younge hears extraordinary personal accounts of racial passing, each a journey towards understanding identity, and belonging.

Passing is a term that originally referred to light skinned African Americans who decided to live their lives as white people. The civil rights activist Walter White claimed in 1947 that every year in America, 12-thousand black people disappeared this way. He knew from first-hand experience. The black president of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People had blonde hair and blue eyes which meant he was able to investigate lynching in the Deep South, while passing in plain sight.

In a strictly segregated society, life on the other side of the colour line could be easier. But it came at a price.

Here, Gary Younge, Professor of Sociology at Manchester University, explores stories of racial passing through the prism of one of his favourite books, Passing, by Nella Larsen.

The 1929 novella brought the concept into the mainstream. It tells the story of two friends; both African-American though one 'passes' for white. It's one of Gary Younge's, favourite books, for all that it reveals about race, class and privilege.

Gary speaks with Bliss Broyard, who was raised in Connecticut in the blue-blood, mono-racial world of suburbs and private schools. Her racial identity was ensconced in the comfort of insular whiteness. Then in early adulthood Bliss' world was turned upside down. On her father's deathbed she learned he was in fact a black man who had been passing as white for most of his life. How did this impact Bliss' identity and sense of self?

Gary hears three extraordinary personal accounts, each a journey towards understanding racial identity, and belonging. With Bliss Broyard, Anthony Ekundayo Lennon, Georgina Lawton and Professor Jennifer DeVere Brody.

Excerpts from 'Passing' read by Robin Miles, the Broadway actress who has narrated books written by Kamala Harris and Roxane Gay.

Producer: Caitlin Smith

Executive Producer: Tony Phillips

Photo: Bliss and her dad Anatole, taken by Sandy Broyard

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BBC Radio 4
BBC Radio 4 logo
24 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

A fresh look at the ancient world. Satire, sex and sausages.

Natalie Haynes takes a fresh look at the ancient world: the worst dinner party in history-meet the writer Petronius. From 2014.

A fresh look at the ancient world.

Natalie Haynes, critic, writer and reformed stand-up comedian, brings the ancient world entertainingly up to date. In each of the four programmes she profiles a figure from ancient Greece or Rome and creates a stand-up routine around them. She then goes in search of the links which make the ancient world still very relevant in the 21st century.

Episode 1: The worst dinner party in history. Natalie investigates the work of the writer Petronius, creator of the infamous Satyricon, later made into a film by Fellini. It’s all about excess; as a vegetarian, Natalie’s particularly revolted by the way in which the Romans insisted on making edible food look disgusting. With satirical cartoonist Martin Rowson, Fellini fan Richard Dyer and historian Victoria Rimell.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2014.

BBC Radio 4
BBC Radio 4 logo
37 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Anthony Grainger was shot dead by police. Why is his family still fighting for justice?

Anthony Grainger was shot dead by the police in 2012. Why is his family still fighting for accountability?

One night in 2012, Anthony Grainger went out and never came home. He was shot dead by Greater Manchester Police in an operation beset with errors and blunders. Why is his family still fighting for accountability?

Genre

BBC Radio 4
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57 minutes Available for 22 days First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Mathew Baynton and Andrew Buchan star as Hamlet's ill-fated attendant lords.

Mathew Baynton, Andrew Buchan and Toby Jones star in Tom Stoppard's classic about Hamlet's ill-fated attendant lords, condemned to an existence over which they have no control.

Mathew Baynton, Andrew Buchan and Toby Jones star in Tom Stoppard's much-loved play about Hamlet's ill-fated attendant lords. Rosencrantz and Guildenstern attempt to discover what roles they are meant to play, in an existence that appears to offer them no control.

Directed by Emma Harding

Rosencrantz.....Mathew Baynton

Guildenstern.....Andrew Buchan

The Player.....Toby Jones

Tragedian.....Sam Dale

Alfred.....Ronny Jhutti

Ophelia.....Sarah Ovens

Polonius.....Michael Bertenshaw

Hamlet.....Parth Thakerar

Claudius.....Don Gilet

Gertrude.....Clare Corbett

Music arranged and performed by Clare Salaman, Philip Hopkins and Amelia Shakespeare from The Society of Strange and Ancient Instruments.

Genre

BBC Radio 4
BBC Radio 4 logo
28 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

A fresh look at the ancient world: Sophocles invents the TV detective.

Natalie Haynes takes a fresh look at the ancient world: Sophocles invents the TV detective with Oedipus. With Edith Hall. From 2014.

A fresh look at the ancient world.

Natalie Haynes, critic, writer and reformed stand-up comedian, brings the ancient world entertainingly up to date. In each of the four programmes she profiles a figure from ancient Greece or Rome and creates a stand-up routine around them. She then goes in search of the links which make the ancient world still very relevant in the 21st century.

Episode 2: Sophocles invents modern drama with Oedipus the King. Spoiler alert! – it doesn't end well. This episode includes handy hints on how to get in the mood for a classical tragedy (bring a bottle.) With Professor Edith Hall, poet and playwright Frank McGuinness and TV critic Andrew Collins.

Producer Christine Hall

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2014.

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for years First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Sitcom about a young woman trying to build a more fulfilling life for herself in Glasgow.

A young woman is trying to build a more fulfilling life for herself in Glasgow – but has she made a big mistake? From 2016.

A sitcom from award-winning comedian Josie Long about a young woman trying to build a new, more fulfilling life for herself in Glasgow.

Glasgow is the indie band theme park, where Josie will finally be happy and accepted. But almost as soon as she de-trains at Queen Street Station she begins to think she's made a big mistake.

Josie sets about finding friends, a place to live and a new job.

Based on characters from the short films "Romance and Adventure" and "Let's Go Swimming" by Josie Long and Douglas King.

Josie - Josie Long

Darren - Darren Osborne

Roddy - Sanjeev Kohli

Kerry - Hatty Ashdown

Eleanor - Clare Grogan

Chris - Michael Bertenshaw

Mona - Rebecca Hamilton

Fraser - Chris Pavlo

Written by Josie Long

Producer: Colin Anderson

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in April 2016.

Genre

BBC Radio 4
BBC Radio 4 logo
28 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Personal stories from people fighting for access to mental health support during lockdown.

An unprecedented number of people have sought mental health support during lockdown. We follow the stories of people seeking help during an extraordinary crisis.

The number of people accessing mental health services in the UK has reached record levels since the start of the pandemic. Many are seeking help for the first time, for others delays in treatment have made life in lockdown much harder.

The Royal College of Psychiatrists claims the number of adults experiencing some form of depression has doubled since March 2020. They say NHS services are struggling to cope with demand, meaning some people are having to wait weeks for referrals.

Life on hold follows six people as they navigate their way through mental health services. They tell us how they have coped, offer their experiences of support and set out their hopes for life post-lockdown.

Among them is Jessie, a frontline worker, who started experiencing anxiety while working to help those suffering from coronavirus. Matt’s ongoing battle with depression became worse after losing his job at the start of the pandemic, while Anjani, a student at Nottingham University struggled being thousands of miles away from her family in India. These are intimate stories of the widespread, but less publicised battle being played out as the world fought Covid 19.

Produced and Presented by Anna Hodges

Technical Production by Mike Smith

BBC Radio 4
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28 minutes Available for years First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Late night spin-off of The Museum of Curiosity, celebrating fascinating far-flung museums.

Professional geeks Alice Levine, John Lloyd and Dan Schreiber discuss the National Army Museum, The Alexander Hamilton Museum and a CIA Museum which no one is allowed to visit.

Museum Lates is a spin-off from Radio Four’s Rose d'Or-winning The Museum of Curiosity. It is a love letter to the world's most fascinating museums hosted by Alice Levine (My Dad Wrote A Porno), John Lloyd (QI, Blackadder, Spitting Image) and Dan Schreiber (No Such Thing As A Fish).

This episode features Terri Dendy, Head of Collections Standards and Care at the National Army Museum, as they chat about some of the objects she curates - including the preserved and (detached) fingers of explorer Bronco Lane; and a box of condoms donated by Andy McNab.

Other museums discussed this week include The Alexander Hamilton Museum (St Kitts and Nevis) and the CIA Museum (USA) which no one is allowed to visit.

https://twitter.com/Alicelevine

https://twitter.com/schreiberland

https://twitter.com/terridendy

https://twitter.com/museumofcurios

https://www.nam.ac.uk

https://nevisisland.com/nevis-history/historical-sites-landmarks/museum-of-nevis-history

https://www.cia.gov/legacy/museum

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BBC Radio 4
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28 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Why should you bother to vote?

Politics students and commentators Dominique Samuels and Emily Hewertson discuss the importance of voting with writer Alistair Heather and creative director David Chukwujekwu.

Tricky is the place to discuss difficult questions away from the bear pit of social media.

Politics students and commentators Dominique Samuels and Emily Hewertson discuss the importance of voting with writer Alasdair Heather and creative director David Chukwujekwu.

In simple numerical terms your vote always counts but what if the party you favour have no chance of getting in or you can’t find anyone you can bring yourself to vote for? Is it worth casting your ballot?

Producers: Myles Bonnar and Peter McManus

Editor: Anthony Browne

A BBC Scotland production for Radio 4

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BBC Radio 4
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28 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Musician Martin Green explores the unlikely connections between Morris dancers and ravers.

Musican Martin Green explores the unlikely connections between Morris dancers and ravers to discover what drives these disparate groups out into the fields to dance at dawn.

On the 1st May 1987 Martin Green’s dad takes him Morris dancing before dawn on Wandlebury Hill outside Cambridgeshire. Many years later, at sunrise on his twenty-third birthday, he walks home from a rave over this same hill.

This uncanny coincidence has got him thinking. To most people, Morris dancing and [raving] rave culture seem so far apart. We like to think we know what sorts of people do what. So, what do these two groups have in common that drives them out into the fields to dance at dawn?

As an accordionist, producer and storyteller, Martin’s own work lives somewhere between traditional music, electronic music and theatre. In 2020 he made a piece of audio theatre that linked the ancient traditions of English dancing to the birth of rave in the 1980s, which led him to draw on events from his own life, of dawn Morris dancing and sunrise raves. This documentary explores those themes. Why do we dance at dawn? Is there an innate desire to do so?

Recollecting his experiences with his father and rave friend Becky, Martin uncovers the traditions and rituals surrounding each activity. He speaks to others who have danced at dawn and seeks expert advice from [the] DJ Lee Burridge, who’s famous for his full moon parties in Thailand and sunrise sets at Burning Man festival.

Taking all this experience on board, Martin undertakes a solo experiment. Removing all people and connections he drives on his own, in the dark to a remote field near his house with a mission. He wants to find out what it is about the music, the dancing and the surroundings that makes dancing at dawn truly special.

Produced by Rebecca Gaskell

Photography by Sandy Butler

A Sparklab production for BBC Radio 4

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