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Woman's Hour

Helen of Troy

BBC Radio 4
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45 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Woman's Hour tries to uncover the real Helen of Troy with Bettany Hughes and Edith Hall.

Woman's Hour tries to uncover the real Helen of Troy with Bettany Hughes and Edith Hall.

Immortalised on vases and in plays and poems, Helen of Troy has excited man's imagination for thousands of years. Woman's Hour tries to uncover the real Helen with Bettany Hughes and Edith Hall.

Is there such a thing as acceptable behaviour during childbirth? Why do different communities encourage women to behave in a certain way? And whose interests does it serve: the mother, the baby, or a culture which may be deeply ambivalent about such a primeval event?

It's the season of mists and fogs and it's a pretty drab time for most gardens. Corinne Julius and Maggie Campbell-Culver, the author of The Origins of Plants, have been looking at ways of brightening things up on the dullest and dankest of days.

Eleanor Bron talks about her new play. 'Twopence to Cross' the Mersey is the title of author Helen Forrester's autobiography of her poverty-stricken childhood in Liverpool in the 1930's. Following a successful run last year the musical play of the book returns this Monday to the Liverpool Empire Theatre, this time starring Eleanor Bron as the older Helen.

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Woman's Hour

Sharenting, Stella Creasy, Science

BBC Radio 4
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48 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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The programme that offers a female perspective on the world

Sharenting is when you put too much information about your children on social media. It could be baby pictures or details of what they're doing or what they've achieved. You might think your post is sweet or funny, but when your children grow up, they might not agree especially when it comes to finding a job. Jane talks to Claire Bessant, a solicitor and Associate Professor at Northumbria Law School and Leah Plunkett, who's an Associate Professor of Legal Skills at the University of New Hampshire in the US and author of ‘Sharenthood’.

Anti-abortion posters were put up in the Labour MP, Stella Creasy’s, constituency in London this weekend. They've now been taken down. Stella Creasy is eight months pregnant, has publicly spoken about the miscarriages she’s had and she’s a prominent campaigner for abortion rights in Northern Ireland. We speak to Stella who feels she's a target for a group called Centre for Bio-Ethical Reform UK, which is behind the posters. We also talk to their spokesperson, Ruth Rawlins.

More books than ever before are now published about women and science. Last week Caroline Criado Perez won the 2019 Royal Society Book Prize for her book ‘Invisible Women: Exposing Data Bias in a World Designed for Men’. It lists the ways in which the world is designed for men, rather than women. We bring Caroline together with neuroscientist, Professor Gina Rippon, whose book ‘The Gendered Brain’ refutes the claim that men and women’s brains are fundamentally different.

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Woman's Hour

Funmi Fetto on her new book, the lack of diversity in the beauty industry and her mission to change it

BBC Radio 4
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47 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Beauty editor Funmi Fetto; older people and domestic abuse; superfans; Johana Gustawsson.

Lack of diversity in the beauty industry; the hidden face of domestic abuse and older people; superfans and their impact on music journalism; Johana Gustawsson and Blood Song.

At least 200,000 older people experienced domestic abuse last year – but the over 75s are being overlooked according to Age UK. Caroline Abrahams is the charity director and joins Jane.

Last year, the music journalist Wanna Thompson posted a tweet about the new album of superstar rapper, Nicki Minaj. The tweet went viral and Wanna received thousands of angry replies from superfans of the star. To discuss the impact of superfans’ responses on music journalism, we hear from Hannah Ewens, Vice journalist and author of ‘FanGirls’, and Wanna Thompson, the music journalist at the centre of the Twitter storm.

Funmi Fetto is the Executive Editor and Beauty Director of Glamour magazine. After many years of being asked by friends, family and stranger on the street for advice on beauty products for women of colour, Funmi decided to curate a comprehensive guide, leading to the release of her new book: Palette: The Beauty Bible for Women of Colour. She speaks to Jane about the lack of inclusivity in the beauty industry and her mission to change it.

International bestselling novelist, Johana Gustawsson has just published a new thriller, 'Blood Song'. The investigation takes readers from the terror of Franco’s rule in 1938 to fertility clinics today in Sweden and Spain. Johana draws on her own experiences of IVF and her struggle to conceive to write 'Blood Song'. Writing the novel was not only a cathartic experience for Johana, it also represented the moment that her husband Mattias agreed to be open about his infertility, their need for a sperm donor and the fact that their three boys are the result of IVF.

Presenter: Jane Garvey

Producer: Kirsty Starkey

Interviewed Guest: Caroline Abrahams

Interviewed Guest: Hannah Ewens

Interviewed Guest: Wanna Thompson

Interviewed Guest: Funmi Fetto

Interviewed Guest: Johana Gustawsson

Interviewed Guest: Mattias Gustawsson

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Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

Toxic Masculinity, Women & running, Judith Gough UK Ambassador to Sweden

BBC Radio 4
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57 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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How the term Toxic Masculinity affects men, Women & Running, UK Ambassador Judith Gough.

Men tell us how the term 'toxic masculinity' affects them, why women are choosing running as their sport of choice, and the UK ambassador in Stockholm Judith Gough.

Drag queen, Courtney Act - real name Shane Jenek, Jordan Stephens from the hip hop duo Rizzle Kicks, and the Chief Executive of the ‘Men and Boys Coalition’, Dan Bell discuss what the term Toxic Masculinity means to them and how it makes them feel.

Why are more women choosing running over other sports when it comes to staying fit? Dame Kelly Holmes talks about the influence of athletes like Dina Asher-Smith, Rachel Baker tells us how running helped her lose weight and Jens Jakob Andersen has researched data with the International Association of Athletics Federations.

The international bestselling novelist Johana Gustawsson’s latest book ‘Blood Song’ draws on her own experiences of IVF and her struggle to conceive. Johana and her husband Mattias tell us about finding out about his infertility and their need for a sperm donor.

Judith Gough the now UK Ambassador to Sweden tells us about her job and her four year position in the Ukraine.

Chrisann Jerrett and Dami Makinde discuss their charity We Belong. They set it up to help young people who came to the UK as children, start the process for legal status.

We hear about the impact of so called ‘Superfans’ on female music journalists. Wanna Thompson tells us how a tweet she sent about Nicki Minaj went viral and Hannah Ewens a journalist from Vice discusses what motivates ‘superfans’.

The author Jojo Moyes talks about new novel ‘The Giver of Stars’ based on the true story of the Horseback Librarians of Kentucky.

Presenter: Jane Garvey

Producer: Rabeka Nurmahomed

Editor: Lucinda Montefiore

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Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

Sonita Alleyne, US Abortion, Women and Architecture

BBC Radio 4
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47 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Sonita Alleyne first woman to lead Jesus College & first black leader of Oxbridge Colleges

The winner of the RIBA Stirling prize for architecture will be announced this evening. On the short list is Annalie Riches who has co-designed a council housing project, the first ever such project to be nominated for this prestigious prize. Jane talks to her and to Zoë Berman, an architect and founder of Part W, which campaigns for the increased visibility of women in architecture and the promotion of designs that work for women and families in the real world.

Nine American states have changed their laws on abortion making it much harder to get one. In Missouri they passed a law in May which meant abortion would only be available up to 8 weeks. The law was due to go into effect at the end of August but it's been temporarily stopped. Even so, there are many rules and regulations regarding abortion that have to be met. Siobhann Tighe visits an abortion clinic in the city of St Louis.

Sonita Alleyne OBE is the first woman to lead Jesus College, Cambridge in its 523 year history and the first ever Black leader of an Oxbridge College. Born in Barbados and brought up in London, she was a Cambridge graduate herself and founded the media company Somethin' Else aged only 24.

Zoe Wanamaker and Zrinka Civtesic are currently performing at the Bridge Theatre in Two Ladies, loosely based on Melania Trump and Brigitte Macron. As their husbands clash over an international crisis, the first ladies of France and America find themselves alone together in a side room. Friends or enemies? When the stakes are so high, can they trust each other? The 'First Ladies@ join Jane Garvey. What appealed to them about portraying these high profile women?

Presenter: Jane Garvey

Interviewed guest: Annalie Riches

Interviewed guest: Zoë Berman

Interviewed guest: Sonita Alleyne

Interviewed guest: Zoe Wanamaker

Interviewed guest: Zrinka Civtesic

Reporter: Siobhann Tighe

Producer: Lucinda Montefiore

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Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

Elaine Welteroth, Endometriosis, 150 Years at Uni

BBC Radio 4
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49 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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The programme that offers a female perspective on the world

Elaine Welteroth is the former editor of Teen Vogue. She joins us to talk about her memoir More Than Enough and how she became the youngest ever Conde Nast Editor-in-Chief as well as only the second African American to hold a post like that. During her time at Teen Vogue she addressed feminism, climate change and racial justice as well as fashion and beauty. She discusses her mixed race identity, the obstacles she's overcome and the reality of getting your dream job.

Today a BBC survey reveals just how disruptive endometriosis can be. At the same time an international conference in Denmark is taking place which is highlighting new research into the condition led by two women. We ask why so little is known about it yet it affects so many women.

We celebrate 150 of women at University. It all started at The University of London. Then Girton College, Cambridge followed as well as Edinburgh University. So how has university education for women progressed over the years and what are the pressing issues today? Jane is joined by women of different generations. including the current NUS President Zamzam Ibrahim.

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Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

Taking babies to protests, Abortion laws in Alabama US, Cassiopeia Berkeley-Agyepong and Simone Ibbett-Brown

BBC Radio 4
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41 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Extinction Rebellion and mothers taking their babies to mass protests.

Mothers committing acts of civil obedience with their children, autumn fashion, is it time for season-less style? Cassiopeia Berkeley-Agyepong and Simone Ibbett-Brown.

Mothers are taking part today in the Extinction Rebellion protests with a mass ‘nurse in’ when they will bottle or breastfeed their young babies on the front line of one of the road blockades. Jenni looks at the history of women taking their children to protests with Anne Pettitt one of the founders of the Women’s Peace Camp at Greenham Common in the 1980’s, Lorna Greenwood one of the organisers of today’s ‘nurse in’ and Dr Caitriona Beaumont, associate Professor of Social History from London South Bank University.

While the catwalks of London, New York and Paris appear to be thriving, the latest figures from the British Retail Consortium reveal that the high street has just experienced its worse September in over 20 years – with clothing sales down 3.9%. There’s also a much greater awareness of the environmental impacts of fast fashion. With 11 million items of clothing going into UK landfill each week, the days of guilt-free shopping sprees are surely over. So what is the real face of fashion today? Stylist and journalist Basma Khalifa discusses the rise of ‘season-less’ style, while Oxfam’s sustainable fashion expert Fee Gilfeather talks about the surge in second-hand fashion as an alternative to buying new.

The second of two reports on the American states that have tightened their abortion laws this year. Today we hear from Alabama which voted in the strictest abortion laws in the whole of America. Despite this there’s a surprising building going up in its largest city, Birmingham. It’s a sexual health clinic which will offer abortions. People are already protesting against it and Siobhann Tighe has been to meet them.

Shuck ‘N’ Jive is the debut play written by Cassiopeia Berkeley-Agyepong and Simone Ibbett-Brown. Frustrated by the stereotypical roles available to them, Cassiopeia and Simone decided to write a play exploring representation and systemic racism in the performing arts.

Presented by Jenni Murray

Produced by Caroline Donne

Interviewed guest: Anne Pettitt

Interviewed guest: Lorna Greenwood

Interviewed guest: Dr. Caitriona Beaumont

Interviewed guest: Basma Khalifa

Interviewed guest: Fee Gilfeather

Interviewed guest: Cassiopeia Berkeley-Agyepong

Interviewed guest: Simone Ibbett-Brown

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Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

Chanel Miller, Fushsia Dunlop, Disrupt the feed

BBC Radio 4
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48 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Chanel Miller, Fushsia Dunlop, safer social media feed, Bronzefield investigation

Chanel Miller on speaking up, Sichuan food with Fushsia Dunlop, curating a social media feed for your child, and Bronzefield investigation.

We hear from the woman known, until recently, as Emily Doe. Chanel Miller was sexually assaulted while she was unconscious on the ground on Stanford University campus in the USA. Her Victim Impact statement which she addressed to her attacker Brock Turner was published on Buzzfeed and was viewed online by eleven million people within four days. In her memoir is titled Know My Name - she explains why.

Following the death of a new born baby in a cell at Bronzefield prison in Surrey, we talk to Deborah Coles, the director of Inquest about what the overarching investigation will need to do, to help prevent further tragedies in women's prisons.

Edwina Dunn, a data entrepreneur and founder of the educational charity The Female Lead, believes that social media can be used to improve teenagers’ mental health. She explains how - and we hear from Dr Anne-Lise Goddings, Clinical Lecturer at UCL Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health.

And, Fuchsia Dunlop explores the flavours of Sichuanese cuisine - known for its liberal use of chillies and Sichuan pepper.

Presenter: Jenni Murray

Producer: Ruth Watts

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Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

The Freedom Project: understanding domestic abuse in relationships

BBC Radio 4
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44 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Domestic abuse programme, Whistle-blower Katharine Gun, Michael Rosen, Singer Beth Hart

Katharine Gun, GCHQ whistle-blower; Michael Rosen and play; Freedom Programme: nationwide groups informing women about domestic abuse; Grammy nominated singer-songwriter Beth Hart;

16 years ago a woman in her twenties, who was a translator at GCHQ, leaked an official and confidential email. It instructed Katharine Gun and her colleagues to share any information they might come across concerning a clutch of nations belonging to the UN Security Council. The information could then be used to persuade them to vote for the invasion of Iraq. Her email became an Observer article and she lost her job, nearly lost her marriage and was in fear of going to prison. Now her story is told in a new film ‘Official Secrets’. She joins Jenni to remember that time in 2003 and explain what happened next.

How much are we squeezing play out of our children’s days, our institutions and spaces? Michael Rosen, author of ‘Book of Play’ joins Jenni to talk about why play matters to both children and adults – and to share tips on how we can get more of it in our lives.

When Sally Challen was recently interviewed on Woman’s Hour she talked about the Freedom Programme she attended, once she was in prison. She described how it helped her understand the coercive control and domestic abuse she had suffered for years from her husband Richard. We speak to Clare Walker, a group facilitator and a trainer for the programme, Pat Craven who founded it and Louise, a listener, who wrote in to say how attending for the last year had changed her life.

We speak to Grammy-award nominated blues singer Beth Hart about finally feeling able to be herself with her new album, War In My Mind.

Presenter: Jenni Murray

Producer: Kirsty Starkey

Interviewed Guest: Katharine Gun

Interviewed Guest: Michael Rosen

Interviewed Guest: Pat Craven

Interviewed Guest: Clare Walker

Interviewed Guest: Beth Hart

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Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

Sonita Alleyne, Play, Beth Hart

BBC Radio 4
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54 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Sonita Alleyne, Master of Jesus College Cambridge, Why we need to play, Beth Hart performs

Sonita Alleyne, Master of Jesus College Cambridge, why children and adults need to play, and Blues singer Beth Hart performs.

Chanel Miller, who was sexually assaulted while she lay unconscious on the grounds of Stanford University campus, talks about reclaiming her identity.

Annalie Riches who's the Winner of the RIBA Sterling Prize for Architecture 2019, tells us about the eco-friendly council estate in Norwich she co-designed. She discusses women’s role in architecture with Zoe Berman, an architect and founder of Part W, which campaigns for more women in architecture.

Michael Rosen who's written a new book called Book of Plays tells us why children and adults need to play more.

Sonita Alleyne OBE is the first ever black leader of an Oxbridge College and the first woman to lead Jesus College Cambridge. She tells us about her new role.

Dr Anne-Lise Goddings, a clinical lecturer at the Institute of Child Health, and Edwina Dunn, a data entrepreneur, tell us why they believe social media can be a force for good and can improve teenager’s mental health.

The Grammy Award-nominated Blues singer Beth Hart performs a song inspired by her sister.

Presenter:: Jenni Murray

Producer: Rabeka Nurmahomed

Editor: Siobhann Tighe

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Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

Elizabeth Siddal and Pre-Raphaelite women, SNP Conference 2019, Faecal incontinence after childbirth

BBC Radio 4
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47 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Elizabeth Siddal, faecal incontinence after childbirth, SNP Conference 2019, Sarah Phelps

Elizabeth Siddal and the Pre-Raphaelite sisters. Faecal incontinence after childbirth, do we need to talk more about it? The SNP's offer to women voters.

Picture: Ophelia by John Everett Millais, 1865-66. Private Collection

The Scottish National Party brings the autumn political conference season to a close this week. The leader of the SNP has made her party’s position clear – she wants the Conservative government out, a Brexit extension secured and a General Election as soon as possible. Last week the First Minister told the Scottish Parliament: "We need to get powers out of the hands of Boris Johnson and his ilk and into the hands of this Parliament so that we don't have to put up with Tory welfare cuts anymore because we can take the right decisions here in the first place to lift people out of poverty." Jane is joined by Shirley Anne Somerville, MSP for Dunfermline and West Fife and Scottish Government Cabinet Secretary for Social Security and Older People to discuss the SNP’s offer to women voters on Brexit, Scottish Independence and other pressing policy issues ahead of a much anticipated General Election.

The “Pre-Raphaelite Sisters” exhibition opens at the National Portrait Gallery this week to show just how engaged and central women were to the production of the art. Over the next few days Woman's Hour features some of these overlooked models, artists, makers, partners and poets. Dr. Jan Marsh curated the exhibition and wrote The Pre-Raphaelite Sisterhood in 1985 and Dr. Alison Smith curated Tate's major Burne-Jones exhibition last year. Today Elizabeth Siddal.

Faecal Incontinence: "It’s like a dirty secret,” one listener told us. Why is faecal incontinence after childbirth so hard to talk about, even to your GP? While conversations around many of the effects of childbirth – from postnatal depression to pelvic floor problems – have become more common in recent years, bowel problems, less so.

It’s thought that sphincter injuries can affect 1 in 10 mothers who’ve had vaginal births - with a higher risk to those having their first baby. So why don’t we talk about it more? Jane speaks to two Woman's Hour listeners living with faecal incontinence and to Dr Sara Webb, Research Midwife at the Institute of Applied Health Research, Birmingham University.

Sarah Phelps, award-winning British screenwriter, joins Jane to talk about her latest TV crime thriller Dublin Murders which starts tonight on BBC1. It's drawn from Tana French’s internationally bestselling Dublin Murder Squad books and stars Killian Scott and Sarah Greene as the two ambitious detectives investigating two murders in Ireland around the turn of the millennium.

Presenter: Jane Garvey

Producer: Caroline Donne

Interviewed guest: Shirley Anne Somerville MSP

Interviewed guest: Jan Marsh

Interviewed guest: Alison Smith

Interviewed guest: Dr. Sara Webb

Interviewed guest: Sarah Phelps

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Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

Women and map reading, Faecal incontinence, Sexual desire and the menopause

BBC Radio 4
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49 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

The Queen's speech, the science behind finding your way, sexual desire and the menopause.

The Queen's Speech; faecal incontinence part 2; sense of direction, map reading and women; sexual desire and the menopause.

The Queen’s speech yesterday contained mention of 26 new or returning Bills and more than a dozen areas where the government plans action. We look at how Boris Johnson’s legislative programme might address the concerns of women and the charge from critics that this is a pre-election manifesto.

We had such a huge response to yesterday’s item on faecal incontinence that today we’ve invited on surgeon Mr Oliver Warren and specialist pelvic physiotherapist Sue Almond to respond to your comments and outline the various treatments available.

Being bad at map reading is one of the many well-worn stereotypes about women. But is it true? The results of a massive global study of over 2.5 million people suggests it is, although not through any innate fault with women’s brains. Gillian Coughlan from the University of East Anglia talks about the science behind finding your way, while former Head of Publishing at the AA Helen Brocklehurst talks about the history of route-finding, women’s relationship with navigation, and her new British Road Map puzzle book.

How often have you heard the comment, the menopause seems to have taken away my sex drive? It’s a topic that psychotherapist and sex therapist Louise Mazanti comes across frequently in her practice. We explore how it’s possible for the two – sex and the menopause - to co-exist happily together.

Presenter: Jane Garvey

Interviewed guest: Anne McElvoy

Interviewed guest: Oliver Warren

Interviewed guest: Sue Almond

Interviewed guest: Gillian Coughlan

Interviewed guest: Helen Brocklehurst

Interviewed guest: Louise Mazanti

Producer: Lucinda Montefiore

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Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

Jung Chang; Living longer: bodies and muscles; Maternity allowance

BBC Radio 4
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46 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Jung Chang, bodies and muscles, maternity allowance, and Remembering Resistance.

Jung Chang on the Soong sisters; maternity allowance; bodies and muscles in old age; and the history of women's protest in the north of England.

Jung Chang is the best-selling author of 'Wild Swans'. She talks about her new book 'Big Sister, Little Sister, Red Sister' and how the three Soong sisters helped shape 20th century China. Maternity Action, a charity that campaigns for the rights of women and babies, says it’s receiving an increasing number of calls to its helpline about Maternity Allowance. New mothers are telling them that they’ve started their maternity leave and given birth, but still haven't received the £148 a week benefit. We hear from their Chief Executive Rosalind Bragg. Just two per cent of women do the recommended 150 minutes of exercise each week. This is a problem because older women that exercise have better immune function and are less likely to suffer falls which are a major cause of poor health and injury for older people. In the second part of our series on health in old age we talk to Professor Janet Lord, an expert in muscle health and immunity from the University of Birmingham and Ann Kirby, an 82 year old writer who is passionate about keeping fit. A new exhibition ‘Empowering Women, Empower Women’ at the Millennium Gallery, Museums Sheffield tells the story of women across the North of England who have fought for change over the last 100 years – from Women Against Pit Closures to the Leeds Clothing strike. Its curator Dr Sarah Marsden is joined by former activists Kate Flannery and Nancy Hall to discuss the tradition of women's protest.

Presenter: Jenni Murray

Producer: Ruth Watts

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Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

How friends help you live longer, Asbestos exposure, Women's cricket, Effie Millais

BBC Radio 4
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41 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

How friends help you live longer, asbestos exposure, women's cricket, Effie Millais

How having a social life in older age can help you live longer; women's exposure to asbestos through washing clothes; the future of women's cricket; and the life of Effie Millais.

In a new three-part series on longevity, we look at how we can shape our health and vitality in old age. Today we focus on the role of our social lives. We all know that meeting up with friends can feel good, but does it actually make any difference to our health? Jenni speaks to psychologist Julianne Holt-Lundstad about how a good social life can be as important to living longer as giving up smoking.

Fibres, a new play, explores the legacy of asbestos in the Glasgow shipyards and the women and families affected by the exposure. Jenni is joined by the playwright Frances Poet, and Phyllis Craig from the charity Action on Asbestos.

The future of women's cricket is looking rosy. Last week the Women’s and Girls' Cricket Plan announced a £20m boost in funding, and the ICC will award the winners of the Women’s T20 World Cup in Australia in 2020 a million dollar prize. We look at the state of the women’s game with Clare Connor, Managing Director of Women’s Cricket at the ECB. What’s being done to make it more attractive for women and girls to play and watch it, and to work within the game too?

We hear the untold stories of five women of Pre-Raphaelite art whose contribution has been overlooked. Today, we hear about Effie Millais whose personal life has always distracted from her achievements as a manager, muse and creative partner to her husband John Everett Millais.

Presenter: Jenni Murray

Interviewed guest: Frances Poet

Interviewed guest: Phyllis Craig

Interviewed guest: Clare Connor

Interviewed guest: Alison Smith

Interviewed guest: Jan Marsh

Interviewed guest: Julianne Holt-Lundstad

Producer: Anna Lacey

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Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

How we can age healthily? Race and gender in the workplace, NI abortion, Comedian Twayna Mayne

BBC Radio 4
BBC Radio 4 logo
47 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

The impact of diet on helping us live a longer healthier life.

The impact of diet on helping us live a longer healthier life. NI abortion. Are race and gender a double disadvantage in the workplace? And comedian Twayna Mayne.

How we can age healthily? Today we look at the impact of our diet. How important is it to eat the right thing to live a longer healthier life?

If the Northern Ireland Assembly is not restored by Monday October 21st, then abortion will become legal in Ulster in line with the rest of the UK. It’s part of the Northern Ireland Bill which was passed in Parliament over the summer. A power-sharing government hasn’t been restored yet, although of course there's still time. We talk to Dr Alyson Hunter, a consultant obstetrician working at the Royal Jubilee Maternity Hospital in Belfast about the new guidelines which have already been drawn up for healthcare professionals.

Are race and gender a double disadvantage in the workplace? Over 85% of BAME women leaders who took part in a study by the management consultancy the Diversity Practice say yes. How should the issue be tackled?

Plus we talk to comedian Twayna Mayne about her new series for BBC Sounds and Radio 4 which addresses among other things her upbringing as a transracial adoptee and how it’s affected her search for her Black British identity.

Presenter Jane Garvey

Producer Beverley Purcell

Guest; Dr Aylson Hunter

Guest; Twayna Mayne

Guest; Professor Kay-Tee Khaw

Guest; Professor Linda Partridge

Guest; Carol Campayne.

Guest; Yvonne Coghill OBE

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Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

Elizabeth Siddal and the Pre-Raphaelite women, Fibres - a play about asbestos, Women's cricket

BBC Radio 4
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57 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Pre-Raphaelite women, Fibres - a play about asbestos, and cricket funding boost.

Pre-Raphaelite women: the untold story of Elizabeth Siddal, the women and families affected by exposure to asbestos, and a funding boost for women's cricket.

We hear the stories of the women of Pre-Raphaelite art whose contribution has been overlooked with Dr Jan Marsh curator at the National Portrait Gallery and from Dr Alison Smith who curated Tate’s major Burne-Jones exhibition.

One in 10 mothers who’ve had virginal births suffer from faecal incontinence. We hear from mums Kirsty and Sophie and from Dr Sarah Webb a specialist midwife in perineal trauma. Oliver Warren a colorectal surgeon and Sue Almond a specialist pelvic physiotherapist answers some of your questions.

The author Jung Chang discusses her latest book Big Sister, Little Sister, Red Sister which tells the story of three women who helped shape the course of 20th century China.

Are race and gender a double disadvantage in the workplace? According to a new report by the Diversity Practice 85% of BAME women leaders say this is the case, an increase of 20% compared to twelve years ago. We discuss the issues with Carol Campayne Director of Diversity Practice and Yvonne Coghill OBE, Director of the NHS Workplace Race Equality Standard Implementation Team and Deputy President of the Royal College of Nursing.

The playwright Frances Poet tells us about Fibres her new play which explores the legacy of asbestos in the Glasgow shipyards. Phyllis Craig from the charity Action on Asbestos tells us about the women and families affected by the exposure.

And we hear about a 20m pound boost in funding for Women and Girls cricket with Clare Conner Managing Director of Women’s Cricket at the ECB.

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Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

Clean Break, PTSD Partners, Sizeism

BBC Radio 4
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42 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Clean Break's 40th, PTSD Part 2, Being Fat.

Clean Break's 40th Birthday. Partners of soldiers with PTSD. Fat and feeling discriminated against.

Clean Break is a theatre company that works with women in prison or have been in prison. Clean Break is now 40 years old. and as part of their birthday celebrations one of their plays is on in the West End of London. It's called [BLANK] and is at the Donmar Warehouse. It looks at the experiences of women behind bars and the impact on their families and across society. Jacqueline Holborough the co-founder of Clean Break comes on the programme together with the play’s director, Maria Aberg and one of the actors, Lucy Edkins.

We have the second in our series about the partners of soldiers with PTSD. Today we hear from Becky, who's 40 and a mum of two. She's known her husband since they were teenagers but she tells our reporter, Tamsin Smith, how PTSD infiltrated their relationship as soon as they moved into military married quarters.

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Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

PHONE-IN. Jenni Murray takes your calls on your experience of being fat

BBC Radio 4
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49 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

What’s your experience of being fat? Call 03700 100 444. Lines open at 0800.

What’s your experience of being fat? Are things more difficult if you’re significantly overweight? Call 03700 100 444. Lines open at 0800.

Sofie Hagan is a young Danish comedian and author of Happy Fat. We spoke to her on the programme earlier in the year. She’s now touring the UK and has been talking about some of the issues raised in the book as well as tweeting about it. ‘I am not a body positivity campaigner,’ she said, ‘I am a fat liberationist. I care about abolishing the systemic discrimination and abuse that fat people endure on a daily basis.’

What’s your experience of being fat? Do you think your size affects the way people see and treat you?

Share your stories and experiences. Call 03700 100 444 lines open from 0800 or email via the website…

Presenter Jenni Murray

Producer Beverley Purcell

Genre

Brand

Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

Partners of veterans with PTSD, Kids and climate change, Regina King

BBC Radio 4
BBC Radio 4 logo
49 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Partners of veterans with PTSD, same-sex marriage, kids and climate change, Regina King.

Partners of veterans with PTSD; same-sex marriage in Northern Ireland; how to talk to your kids about climate change; and Regina King on her latest series, Watchmen.

In a new series, we hear from three women whose partners are veterans with PTSD. They describe what it's like living alongside the condition, often for decades, and how it's affected their own mental health, relationships and self-confidence. Over the past two years the charity Combat Stress has been running workshops across the country to help partners in crisis. This summer they launched an online programme - the first of its kind in the UK - designed to help partners isolated at home due to caring responsibilities, childcare and work pressures. Today we hear Sheila's story and how she found help for herself and her husband.

Things are changing for women in Northern Ireland. Abortion has just been decriminalised and we can expect same-sex marriage to become available in the New Year. Northern Ireland was actually the first place in the UK where gay couples could get a civil partnership, but is now the last place in the UK to have same-sex marriage. Jane speaks to Grainne Close and Shannon Sickles - the first couple to get a civil partnership 15 years ago - about how things have changed.

As more and more children and young people become engaged in environmental issues, how can parents support them and talk to them about climate change in an age-appropriate way? And are schools doing enough to educate this eco-conscious generation? We discuss with climate change psychotherapist Caroline Hickman, climate change teacher Fiona Cowen and teen eco-activist Ella Mann.

The Oscar winning American actress Regina King, star of 'Boyz n the Hood', 'Jerry McGuire', 'Seven Seconds' and ‘If Beale Street Could Talk’, has been named as one of Time’s 100 most influential people of 2019. She talks to Jane about her new series, ‘Watchmen’.

Genre

Brand

Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

Women and Conservation, Linda Hazzard and her fasting cure, Women's attitudes to Brexit

BBC Radio 4
BBC Radio 4 logo
49 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Why are so many organisations in charge of protecting the UK countryside led by women?

We explore what women think about Brexit and how it might affect the way they vote in another possible referendum and in an expected general election.

We explore what women think about Brexit and how it might affect the way they vote in another possible referendum and in an expected general election.

Near the beginning of the 20th century 'Dr' Linda Hazzard ran a sanatorium in Washington state, USA where she encouraged her patients to fast for months on end. Some of her patients sang her praises but many died of starvation under her care. Now the subject of a play, we explore her curious life and her search for a 'perfect cure'.

Many of the organisations in charge of protecting the UK countryside are led by women. A coincidence or are women bringing anything different to the table?

There is a new exhibition at the National Portrait Gallery in London, Pre-Raphaelite Sisters. The images of the Pre-Raphaelite painting - all sumptuous locks and languid poses - might be what we think of but their stories as artists, managers and artistic partners have been erased. Today we consider Joanna Boyce Well.

Presenter: Jane Garvey

Interviewed guest: Dr Michelle Harrison

Interviewed guest: Dr Rosie Shorrocks

Interviewed guest: Kate Valentine

Interviewed guest: Kate Barton

Interviewed guest: Marian Spain

Interviewed guest: Beccy Speight

Interviewed guest: Minette Batters

Interviewed guest: Dr Jan Marsh

Interviewed guest: Dr Alison Smith

Producer: Lucinda Montefiore

Genre

Brand

Woman's Hour

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