Showing results for your search filters

Order by: Relevance | First broadcast | Most recent broadcast | Availability ending soon

Woman's Hour

Nannie, the figurehead for the Cutty Sark; The power of giving away power; No fault divorce;

BBC Radio 4
BBC Radio 4 logo
57 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Nannie and Cutty Sark; Good Leadership; DJ Jaguar; No-fault divorce; Women's Super League

Nannie and the Cutty Sark; Matthew Barzun, Baroness Amos and the power of giving away power; DJ Jaguar and diversity in music; the delay of no fault divorce; Women's Super League.

The G7 kicks off in Cornwall today. Boris Johnson and leaders from Japan, Canada, Italy and France who make up the Group of Seven will be joined by US President Joe Biden and the German Chancellor Angela Merkel . On the agenda the biggest issues affecting our world - everything from climate change to the economic recovery post Covid. But how should they change their approach? How much better could things be if leaders, instead of lording their power over us and operating a top-down approach, did something different? In his new book 'The Power of Giving Away Power', Matthew Barzun argues that if leaders just let go and listened and worked more closely with their colleagues, we'd see things thrive and grow. Baroness Valerie Amos, now the Master of University College, Oxford joins him.

As live music events draw closer and closer, we ask – how diverse is the music industry? And what can be done to make things more inclusive? We hear from one DJ Jaguar, about her own experiences and an initiative to train other young women.

As no fault divorce is delayed we ask if there is a way to make divorce less complicated and confrontational? We hear from Ellie, who is in the middle of a break-up, a high profile divorce lawyer, Ayesha Vardag, and Kate Daly, the founder of Amicable – an online divorce service.

In the Women's Super League the transfer window opens today with a new rule forcing clubs to include eight homegrown players in their squad. They must have been trained by their club, or another club in England, for at least three years before their 21st birthday. BBC sports presenter, Charlie Webster, joins Chloe Tilley.

Today the new figurehead known as Nannie will start to be installed on the prow of the famous ship, the Cutty Sark: the tea clipper that resides in a specially designed dry dock in Greenwich next to the river Thames in London. The figurehead of a ship is often a woman but why and what is their significance? Louise Macfarlane, senior curator at the Cutty Sark, explains.

Presenter: Chloe Tilley

Producer: Kirsty Starkey

Interviewed Guest: Baroness Valerie Amos

Interviewed Guest: Matthew Barzun

Interviewed Guest: Jaguar Bingham

Interviewed Guest: Kate Daly

interviewed Guest: Ayesha Vardag

Interviewed Guest: Ellie

Interviewed Guest: Charlie Webster

Interviewed Guest: Louise Macfarlane

Genre

Brand

Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

Paloma Faith, Nursing, Maya Forstater Verdict

BBC Radio 4
BBC Radio 4 logo
58 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Women's voices and women's lives - topical conversations to inform, challenge and inspire.

We talk to Paloma Faith about her music, her films, being a mother of two daughters, and harassment towards women and girls. She's got a new single out called Monster which is about her relationship with her career.

We hear from two nurses who tell us how the past year and a half has been for them. In the light of a report published earlier this week by the Health Select Committee we discuss burn-out and how health staff are so tired because of the pandemic that many are quitting and morale is at an all time low.

Dr Gwen Adshead is one of Britain’s leading forensic psychiatrists and has spent 30 years providing therapy in secure hospitals and prisons. She worked extensively with violent women. Her book, The Devil You Know, co-authored with Eileen Horne, is a collection of 11 stories about men and women who've committed acts of terrible violence.

And we have bring you the breaking news that Maya Forstater has won her Appeal against an employment tribunal. Maya Forstater went to a tribunal in 2019 when her employment contract wasn't renewed after she posted tweets about gender recognition. She lost that case, but this morning - having taken it further - she's won the Appeal.

Genre

Brand

Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

Women's Health Special - Nadine Dorries, Unwell Women, Mesh removal centres, Autoimmunity

BBC Radio 4
BBC Radio 4 logo
58 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Women's Health Special - Nadine Dorries, Unwell Women, Mesh removal centres, Autoimmunity

Women's health has been neglected throughout history. Will a new Women's Health Strategy help turn things around?

Women's health has long been the poor relation when it comes to medical understanding, funding and research. The government says it wants that to change - and earlier this year announced the establishment of England's first Women's Health Strategy, which will look at women's health across our lifespans. The priorities of that strategy will be shaped, they say, by the results of a public call for evidence which closes this Sunday. But after centuries of - as the Health Secretary Matt Hancock put it - 'living with a health and care system that is mostly designed by men, for men', what sort of confidence should we have in this strategy bringing about meaningful change? Emma Barnett is joined by Women's Health Minister, Nadine Dorries.

Why are so many women dismissed, disbelieved or misdiagnosed when they seek medical help? Dr Elinor Cleghorn, cultural historian and author of 'Unwell Women - A journey through medicine and myth in a man-made world', says the answer lies in over a thousand years of history. She talks to Emma about the shockingly slow pace of change in attitudes to women's health, why women's pain still isn't taken seriously, and how the message that women's bodies are at the mercy of their thoughts and feelings has burrowed deep into our consciousness.

In April this year, seven specialist mesh complication centres were launched in England to help treat women harmed by the use of pelvic mesh. These centres were recommended in a report by Baroness Cumberlege as a way of concentrating expertise and improving outcomes. But how are the centres working so far? And what are the fears and concerns still facing those women waiting for their mesh to be removed? Listener Judi tells us her experience, and Prof Hashim Hashim, a urological surgeon with specialist skill in mesh removal, explains why the surgery is so complicated and how medical professionals are trying to rebuild trust amid so much pain and anger.

Around four million people have an autoimmune disease in the UK - so around 8% of the population. But of these four million, 78% are women. Reporter Carolyn Atkinson talks to Professor Lucy Walker about a new study into what might tie all these conditions together, and also Nina Christie, who currently lives with three autoimmune conditions.

Presenter Emma Barnett

Producer Anna Lacey

Genre

Brand

Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

Abortion in America, Stamping out sexual harassment in the workplace, Talking to young people about drugs

BBC Radio 4
BBC Radio 4 logo
58 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Women's voices and women's lives - topical conversations to inform, challenge and inspire.

Abortion in America, Stamping out sexual harassment in the workplace, Talking to young people about drugs.

Last month the US Supreme Court agreed to consider a major challenge to reproductive rights, saying it will look at the state of Mississippi’s bid to enforce a ban on almost all abortions after the 15th week of pregnancy. Two days later the Republican governor of Texas, Greg Abbott, signed into law a six-week abortion ban. Why are attempts to reduce women’s access to these services being made? Last week one young Texan woman decided to use her platform at her high school graduation to give a speech on the so-called ‘Heartbeat Bill’. A speech that has gone viral. Emma speaks to 18 year-old Paxton Smith, and to Amanda Taub, a reporter for the New York Times.

Last week we heard from Lord Heseltine who was unhappy about being forced as a Member of the House of Lords to attend an online course around sexual harassment entitled 'Valuing Everyone Training’. In response, we received a text: ‘I’m a young female staffer and did the Valuing Everyone course last autumn. It wasn’t bad, but wouldn’t stop people mistreating colleagues/staff and isn’t a replacement for a proper HR system.' We speak to Stella Chandler, Focal Point Training who runs similar courses, and Deeba Syed, a lawyer who set up and manages the sexual harassment at work advice line at Rights of Women on what needs to be done to stamp out sexual harassment in the workplace.

Daniel Spargo-Mabbs was a popular, intelligent and charismatic 16 year-old boy. But one evening in January 2014, he never came home. Dan had gone to an illegal rave and taken a lethal dose of the drug MDMA. Seven years later, his mother Fiona Spargo-Mabbs, is one of the country’s leading drug education advisors, and has just published the book ‘I Wish I’d Known: Young People, Drugs and Decisions; a Guide for Parents and Carers'.

Presenter: Emma Barnett

Producer: Frankie Tobi

Genre

Brand

Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

Dido Harding, Friendship between gay men and straight women, Foreign aid cuts

BBC Radio 4
BBC Radio 4 logo
57 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Dido Harding's first interview since leaving her job setting up test and trace.

Dido Harding was brought in to set up a trest and trace system to help stop the Covid-19 pandemic. This is her first interview since leaving the job.

It’s just over a year since the businesswoman and conservative peer Dido Harding was brought in to set up a test and trace system to help stop the Covid-19 pandemic. The system was going to be “world beating” and help get the UK out of lockdown according to the Prime minister but the incredible costs involved – around £37 billion – have been criticised for failing to make an impact. The system has improved but what will its legacy be? Dido Harding talks to Emma Barnett on Woman’s Hour today in her first interview since leaving the role last month and reflects on the ups and downs of the last year.

As we celebrate Pride Month throughout June we thought we'd spend a moment celebrating the relationship between gay men and their female BFF. From reality stars like Jenny and Lee on Googlebox and Olivia Bentley's relationship with Ollie and Gareth in Made in Chelsea to Will and Grace to the designer Halston and Liza Minelli. What is it about the relationship that makes them so special?

A group of MPs, Including the former Prime Minister Theresa May, are trying to push through a vote in parliament which they hope will reverse controversial cuts to the international aid budget. It's likely that an amendment to the Advanced Research and Invention Agency bill will happen, and that technical change will result in aid spending going back to what it was. It was recently cut from 0.7% to 0.5. Preet Gill MP is Shadow International Development Secretary and Ella Whelan is a journalist and commentator who doesn't believe in foreign aid.

Presenter: Emma Barnett

Producer: Lucinda Montefiore

Genre

Brand

Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

Arooj Aftab, PIP implants, Race, trauma & culture, Reclaiming sexist language

BBC Radio 4
BBC Radio 4 logo
58 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Arooj Aftab; PIP implants; Race, trauma and culture; Reclaiming sexist language.

Arooj Aftab, PIP implants, Race, trauma & culture, Sexist language and women.

Arooj Aftab is a Pakistani composer, based in Brooklyn. She joins Anita to talk about her music and influences from jazz and Qawwali to Jeff Buckley and Abidi Parveen. She explains how grief has shifted the tone of her music to ‘heavy metal harp’, and discusses her latest album, Vulture Prince, which honours and reimagines centuries-old ghazals, a form of South Asian poetry and music that she grew up listening to with her family.

Now the dust has settled on the recent court ruling on compensation for women with PIP Implants, it's become clear a group of women will miss out. The French court ruled that those who had implants pre 2006 will not get any money, as it decided the safety regulator who approved the implants for market couldn't have been aware of any problems before that date. Lawyers representing the women will go back to the French supreme court to fight this. Melanie Abbott has been looking into this.

Therapist and researcher, Guilaine Kinouni’s book Living While Black looks at the racial inequalities within the mental health system and their consequences for Black people. She is joined by author, academic, and broadcaster Emma Dabiri whose new book What White People Can Do Next looks at racial justice and how we demonstrations of support can be transformed into real and meaningful change.

Language – and the way we use it – is forever changing. We explore how the word ‘bitch’ and other similar words with a sexist history are being reclaimed and reinvented by women to mean something positive. Chante Joseph is a social media creative and writer. Jacqueline Springer is a Black music and culture journalist. Helen Taylor is an Emeritus Professor of English at the University of Exeter.

Presenter: Anita Rani

Producer: Frankie Tobi

Genre

Brand

Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

Author, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

BBC Radio 4
BBC Radio 4 logo
58 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie; 'Valuing Everyone'; Parm Sandhu; Summer Legs.

Author Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie and 'Notes on Grief'; 'Valuing Everyone': a course on appropriate behaviour with colleagues; Parm Sandhu - 30 years in the Met Police; summer legs.

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie is the author of novels including 'Purple Hibiscus', 'Half of a Yellow Sun', which won the Orange Prize (now called the Women’s Prize for Fiction), and 'Americanah', which won the US National Book Critics Circle Award. Chimamanda has also delivered two landmark TED Talks: The Danger of A Single Story, and We Should All Be Feminists, which started a worldwide conversation about feminism and was published as a book in 2014. She has now written a more personal book. On 10 June 2020 her father died suddenly in Nigeria. A self-confessed daddy’s girl, she has now remembered her father in a tribute, 'Notes on Grief'. Her mother has since also died. How do you deal with double heartbreak? Chimamanda joins Emma to examine the layers of loss and the nature of grief.

Lord Michael Heseltine, who was Deputy Prime Minister in the mid-nineties, says he's had to attend a House of Lords course to do with what's right and what's wrong when it comes to conduct between colleagues, especially between men and women. The training is called "Valuing Everyone". The House of Lords has been very firm about this online course on inappropriate behaviour and prejudice, saying all peers must attend. Lord Heseltine was sent a reminder that he MUST complete it, which seems to have aggravated him a great deal. He’s here, and so is Wera (pron: VERA) Hobhouse, Lib Dem MP. In the House of Commons, the course isn't mandatory for MPs.

Parm Sandhu grew up in the Midlands - a child of immigrants from the Punjab whose main ambition for her she says was to become an ‘obedient wife’. Forced into an arranged marriage at 16 she later fled to London and in 1989 joined the police. In her memoir ‘Black and Blue: One Woman’s Story of policing’ which is out next week, she tells her story of her thirty years in the Metropolitan police - rising through the ranks from a WPC to Chief Superintendent and becoming New Scotland Yard’s most senior ethnic minority woman in the force. She tells us her 30 year career was marred by repeated racism and sexism and a charge of gross misconduct which she was later cleared of. This led to her bringing an employment tribunal claim against the force and reaching a financial settlement with them last year.

The sun is out and if you’re looking out your summer dresses and skirts you might also be weighing up the state of your skin after months of slobbing at home in your lockdown comfies. Sales of personal grooming products like deodorant, skincare products and razors went down during the pandemic so will we be embracing the natural look? Or maybe you already do as a member of the hairy legs club? We talk to the stand-up comedian, Ashley Storrie about her beauty regime and also to George Driver, the acting Beauty Director of ELLE UK.

Presenter: Emma Barnett

Producer: Kirsty Starkey

Interviewed Guest: Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

Interviewed Guest: Michael Heseltine

Interviewed Guest: Wera Hobhouse

Interviewed Guest: Parm Sandhu

Interviewed Guest: Ashley Storrie

Interviewed Guest: George Driver

Genre

Brand

Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

The Politics of Motherhood, Big Night Out Reading, Women and environmental art.

BBC Radio 4
BBC Radio 4 logo
58 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Women and environmental art and why despite decades progress motherhood is still so hard?

Women and environmental art and why, after decades of social progress, is motherhood still so much harder than it needs to be?

You may have visited Kew Gardens and seen the incredible gallery of botanical art created by Marianne North - she is one of several female artists being featured at the Herbert Art Gallery and Museum as part of Coventry's UK City of Culture Celebrations. The exhibition, called UnNatural History, explores not only the historical role of artists in the science of natural history - but also contemporary artists addressing the current climate crisis. But with so much focus on the environment how effective is art in grabbing the public's attention? Alice Sharp is the founder of Invisible Dust who have curated the exhibition and Frances Disley is an artist who examines the medicinal properties of plants and healing power of nature.

Why, after decades of social progress is motherhood still so much harder than it needs to be? Why aren't we honest about the realities of being a mother? These are just two of the themes explored in a trio of books about motherhood that have just been published. It's not as if these questions haven't been asked before. There is a rich vein of literature from Simone de Beauvoir's The Second Sex through to Adrienne Rich's classic study Of Woman Born, Juliet Mitchell's A Women's Estate , Jane Lazarre's The Mother Knot and many more. And many second wave feminists fought hard for the rights of mothers on both sides of the Atlantic. And yet very little, if any progress, has been made according to this new crop of authors. Elaine Glaser author of Motherhood: A Manifesto and Pragya Agarwal author of (M)otherhood: On the Choices of Being a Woman join Emma.

A few weeks ago as meeting up began to look possible again, we asked you to tell us about who you were desperate to see again and why. Last week we heard from Chris and her mates in Cardiff - this week listener Sally-Ann from Reading wanted to nominate 'the girls' - she's had a tough year and not seeing them face to face has been hard. Our reporter Jo Morris spoke to Sally-Ann as she prepared to host a garden get-together and popped into one of their regular Zoom chats to eavesdrop on their banter and memories.

Boric acid is a white powder that can do everything from get stains out of your clothes, to stop your fridge smelling, to acting as a pesticide. But apparently there's another use for this chemical remedy, and mentions of it have been popping up lately on social media threads and message boards: it can also be used as a treatment for chronic bacterial vaginosis. However, it is also being used for less serious vaginal infections. Dr Jen Gunter, American gynaecologist, obstetrician and author of the Vagina Bible says she has seen an increase in the use of boric acid vaginal pessaries among her patients over the past few years, paralleling an explosion of new over the counter boric acid products and heavy marketing from celebrities, influencers, naturopaths, and functional medicine providers. She explains her concerns.

Genre

Brand

Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

Sinead O'Connor, Your returning to work manifesto.

BBC Radio 4
BBC Radio 4 logo
56 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Sinead O'Connor, and returning to work post-pandemic.

Sinead O'Connor on her autobiography 'Remembering'. Also, if you were writing a manifesto for the best way for women to work post-pandemic, what would it say?

It's one of the most unforgettable moments in pop. Sinead O'Connor singing Nothing Compares 2 U straight into the camera. Big eyes, shaved head, minimal make up - tears rolling down her cheeks. It catapulted her to fame whether she liked it or not. Sinead joins Emma to talk about her autobiography," Rememberings"

The ‘work from home’ guidelines are expected to be scrapped on June 21 - should the government’s current roadmap continue. If you were writing a manifesto for the best way for women to work post-pandemic what would it say? We hear from author and columnist, Elizabeth Uviebinené who argues in her new book ‘The Reset’ for a fundamental reset of our entire work culture, Danny Harmer, Chief People Officer for Aviva on how big companies are addressing the flexibility needs of their workforce and Mark Gatto, father of a two-year-old and research associate in masculinities and working parenthood,

Presenter Emma Barnett

Producer Beverley Purcell

PHOTO CREDIT; Donal Moloney

Genre

Brand

Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

A Celebration of Women's Sporting Success

BBC Radio 4
BBC Radio 4 logo
57 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

A Celebration of Women's Sporting Success

We celebrate some of women's most recent sporting successes with a group of female influencers in the sporting world and discuss how to maintain this momentum.

Over the last few weeks and months we have seen women make huge progress in the world of sport. It was just over a month ago that the jockey Rachael Blackmore made history by becoming the first female rider to win the Grand National in its 173 year history. Also last month Rebecca Welch became the first female referee to oversee an English Football League match in 134 years. And the former footballer Alex Scott has become the presenter of the BBC’s Football Focus, becoming the show's first permanent female host in its history.

It comes against a backdrop that has seen viewing figures for women’s football and rugby continue to grow despite a virtually invisible summer of competition last year. But a recent BBC Survey of elite sportswomen found that more than 60% earn less than £10,000 a year from their sport. So what still needs to be done when it comes to building on women’s success in sport and how can this upward momentum be maintained and include a variety of sports and not just football, cricket and rugby?

We have gathered some of the biggest influencers in the sporting world around a virtual round table. Zarah El-Kudcy a Trustee at the Women’s Sports Trust and the Head of Commercial Partnership Development at Formula 1, Emily Defroand a Great Britain and England Hockey player, Catherine Bond Muir the CEO of the W Series a motor racing championship for women, Kelly Simmons the FA’s Director of the Women’s Professional Game, Alison Kervin a writer and former Sports Editor for the Mail on Sunday (she was the first female sports editor on a national newspaper) and Dr Ali Bowes is a senior lecturer in the Sociology of Sport at Nottingham Trent University.

Presenter: Anita Rani

Producer: Rabeka Nurmahomed

Editor: Beverley Purcell

Genre

Brand

Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

Weekend Woman's Hour: Holly Smale, Paris Lees, #MeToo in the British Army, Hormones and vaccines

BBC Radio 4
BBC Radio 4 logo
58 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Geek Girl author Holly Smale on her autism diagnosis, Paris Lees, Hormones and vaccines.

Geek Girl author Holly Smale on being diagnosed with autism age 39. Paris Lees' memoir What it Feels like for a Girl. Hormones and the COVID vaccination.

A former senior Army officer is calling for the military to have a “#MeToo moment” and is claiming that hundreds of female troops have been raped and sexually abused by colleagues. Lt Col Diane Allen, who served for 37 years, says the Armed Forces are being run by “a toxic group of privately-educated white senior officers” We talk to Diane Allen and also hear from the Defence Minister Baroness Goldie.

Some women and trans men are reporting unusual symptoms after having their Covid vaccinations – ranging from menstrual irregularities to bleeding post menopause. We talk to the reproductive immunologist Dr Viki Male from Imperial College in London to find out what’s behind these symptoms.

The best selling author of the Geek Girl series Holly Smale has been diagnosed with autism at age 39. She said she feels relief that she now has an explanation for why she’s felt she’s never “fitted in”.

Prof Catherine Heymans, astrophysicist and world-leading expert in the so-called dark universe, is now the Astronomer Royal of Scotland. She's the first woman to hold this prestigious role, but the problem is she's still not entirely convinced she should have the job. She talks to us about impostor syndrome, challenging the status quo and dealing with aggressive criticism.

Paris Lees is a journalist, anti-bullying campaigner, and a Contributing Editor at British Vogue. She was the first openly trans woman to present on BBC Radio 1, and also the first to appear on Question Time. She’s written a memoir called What it Feels like for a Girl, which covers the period aged 13 to 18 – a turbulent, heady time full of adventure and disaster.

What generation do you define as? The term 'geriatric millennial' went viral last week, after writer Erica Dhwan used it to describe the micro-generation born between 1980 and 1985. Erica believes they make particularly good employees due to their experience of life before the digital world. Rosa Silverman, a senior features writer at the Telegraph, says she is proud to self-define as one of the around 5 million UK geriatric millennials in the UK.

Genre

Brand

Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

Covid vaccines and women, Paris Lees & Nero's women

BBC Radio 4
BBC Radio 4 logo
58 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

How Covid vaccines are affecting women, Paris Lees and Nero’s women

Women and unusual symptoms after Covid vaccines, Paris Lees on her memoir and the women during the reign of Nero.

Some women and trans men are reporting unusual symptoms after having their Covid vaccinations – ranging from menstrual irregularities to bleeding post menopause. We talk to the reproductive immunologist Dr Viki Male from Imperial College in London to find out what’s behind these symptoms and also consider the issue of vaccine hesitancy amongst young women, vaccination during pregnancy and the impact of Covid and the vaccine on breast feeding mums.

Of the twelve judges on the Supreme Court – the highest court in the land – all are white and only two are women. So what needs to be done to increase diversity within the UK judicial system, and what obstacles remain in place today? Vicky Fox, the Chief Executive of the Supreme Court, and Stephanie Boyce, President of the Law Society discuss.

Paris Lees is a journalist, anti-bullying campaigner, and a Contributing Editor at British Vogue. She was the first openly trans woman to present on BBC Radio 1, and also the first to appear on Question Time. She’s written a memoir called What it Feels like for a Girl, which covers the period aged 13 to 18 – a turbulent, heady time full of adventure and disaster.

Nero was the 5th Emperor of Rome and one of its most infamous rulers, notorious for his cruelty, debauchery and eccentricity. He ruled at a time of great social and political change, overseeing momentous events such as the Great Fire of Rome and Boudica’s rebellion in Britain. He allegedly killed his mother and his two wives, only cared about his art and had very little interest in ruling the empire. The writer and classicist Natalie Haynes has been to see a new exhibition of Nero at the British Museum in London and tells us how the women in his life shaped his reign.

We asked listeners to tell us about the groups of friends they were desperate to meet up with when Covid regulations allowed. Chris from Cardiff wanted to celebrate the women she's known for more than 50 years as they planned a big night out together and our reporter Jo Morris eavesdropped on the banter and the memories.

Presenter: Anita Rani

Producer: Rabeka Nurmahomed

Genre

Brand

Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

Gemma Arterton, Care Homes, The Astronomer Royal

BBC Radio 4
BBC Radio 4 logo
58 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Women's voices and women's lives - topical conversations to inform, challenge and inspire.

Gemma Arterton’s latest acting role is in a play called Walden. It's on in London’s West End and it's the story of estranged twin sisters: one's a botanist for Nasa and the other's a former architect for Nasa. They meet up in a remote cabin in the woods sometime in the future, when the earth’s situation is looking bleak.

We take a look at some of claims made yesterday by Dominic Cummings about care homes with Gisella Casciello Rogers whose 85 year old father died in one last year. And we also have Helen Wildbore from The Relatives and Residents Association.

Prof Catherine Heymans, astrophysicist and world-leading expert in the so-called dark universe, is now the Astronomer Royal of Scotland. She's the first woman to hold this prestigious role, but the problem is she's still not entirely convinced she should have the job. She suffers from impostor syndrome, but we know she shouldn't! She talks to Emma about challenging the status quo and dealing with aggressive criticism.

And we have Annie Macmanus (formerly known as Annie Mac, the DJ) and Esther Freud talking about their new novels which have common themes: motherhood and the risk of losing yourself.

Genre

Brand

Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

#MeToo in the British Army, Dominic Cummings, Women & Art: How We Look, Geriatric Millennials

BBC Radio 4
BBC Radio 4 logo
58 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Women's voices and women's lives - topical conversations to inform, challenge and inspire.

#MeToo in the British Army, Dominic Cummings, Women & Art: How We Look, Geriatric Millennials

A former senior Army officer is calling for the military to have a “#MeToo moment” and is claiming that hundreds of female troops have been raped and sexually abused by colleagues. Lt Col Diane Allen, who served for 37 years, says the Armed Forces are being run by “a toxic group of privately-educated white senior officers” We talk to Diane Allen and also hear from the Defence Minister Baroness Goldie.

Dominic Cummings, the Prime Minister’s former chief advisor, will today face questions from senior MPs over the government’s response to the pandemic. Cummings is a controversial figure in Westminster, and since leaving his position as Boris Johnson’s top aide, he has not gone quietly, making a series of damning claims against the Prime Minister and government. But would the media and political coverage have been the same had he been a woman? Caroline Nokes, the Conservative chair of the Women and Equalities Committee, joins us to discuss.

Art historian Catherine McCormack has just published an impassioned book, Women in the Picture: Women Art and the Power of Looking. She argues that women's identity has long been stifled by dodgy narratives and a limited set of archetypes. For art history to remain relevant, she says, we need to look again and reconsider many of the classics displayed in art galleries.

What generation do you define as? The term 'geriatric millennial' went viral last week, after writer Erica Dhwan used it to describe the micro-generation born between 1980 and 1985. Erica believes they make particularly good employees due to their experience of life before the digital world. Rosa Silverman, a senior features writer at the Telegraph, says she is proud to self-define as one of the around 5 million UK geriatric millennials in the UK.

Genre

Brand

Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

Babes in the wood, Ecocide, Sexism in craft beer, and How to save a life

BBC Radio 4
BBC Radio 4 logo
57 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Babes in the wood, Ecocide, Sexism in craft beer, and How to save a life

Michelle Hadaway, the mother of one of the girls murdered in the Babes in the Wood case, speaks to Emma about her daughter's clothing, DNA evidence and Martin Bashir.

Karen Hadaway was one of two little girls murdered in the Babes in the Wood case. Her mother, Michelle, tells us about giving her daughetr's clothes to Martin Bashir in 1991 to get DNA tested. She still hasn't got them back. He says he can't remember the exchange. Michelle describes her feelings in light of the Dyson investigation.

Should the mass destruction of nature, also known as ecocide, be a crime? At the moment there are four crimes covered by the International Criminal Court - genocide, war crimes, crimes against humanity and the crime of aggression. Now campaigners are pushing to have ecocide added to the list. We're joined by Jojo Mehta, the co-founder of Stop Ecocide International and barrister Philippe Sand.

Seven years ago “Eva Carter” saved her partner's life. She tells Emma how the experience of that night and her feelings at the time and afterwards fed into her novel How To Save A Life.

In recent days there has been a huge outpouring on social media of women sharing their experiences of sexism working in the craft beer industry. An online conference will be held next month to discuss he problem. Emma is joined by Charlotte Cook, head brewer at Coalition Brewing and Melissa Cole, beer writer and author of The Little Book of Craft Beer.

Note: This podcast has been edited from the original programme. In this programme reference was made to a journalist called Eileen Fairweather, who Michelle Hadaway says witnessed the handing over of her daughter’s clothes to Martin Bashir. Eileen worked with him for several months in 1991, researching a possible BBC documentary. Eileen Fairweather has confirmed to us that her contract ended immediately after that meeting and she never saw Bashir again. She repeatedly tried to find out from Martin Bashir and his team what happened to the clothes and has previously tried to alert the BBC to this issue. She has raised this issue in several newspaper articles and supports Michelle’s fight for the truth about what Bashir did with this evidence. Eileen Fairweather is an award-winning freelance journalist who has specialised for decades in exposing child abuse and institutional cover-ups, including the mass abuse in Islington's children's homes. Her ground breaking work has won the Catherine Pakenham Award for women journalists and two British Press Awards.

Genre

Brand

Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

Holly Smale, Caroline Dinenage MP, Ursula Le Menn & Anne-Elisabeth Moutet, Proff. Asma Khalil & Dr. Mary Ross-Davie

BBC Radio 4
BBC Radio 4 logo
58 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Holly Smale, Caroline Dinenage MP, trial of Valerie Bacot & a new Covid/Pregnancy study

Geek Girl author Holly Smale, Digital Minister Caroline Dinenage, the case of Valerie Bacot who's about to be tried for killing her husband and a new report on Pregnancy & Covid.

On Woman's Hour today Emma Barnett talks to the best selling author Holly Smale about being diagnosed with autism at age 39. The author of the "Geek Girl" series has said she feels relief that she now has an explanation for why she’s felt she’s never “ fitted in”.

We speak to the journalist Rosamund Urwin about her scoop on the Martin Bashir story and also to the Digital Minister Caroline Dinenage MP about what’s in the new Online Safety Bill.

In a few weeks, a French woman will stand trial for killing her husband, but she's got the support of thousands of people in France who've signed a petition and want her pardoned. Valerie Bacot was with her older husband for decades. Valerie's now 40, but she knew her husband since she was 12. From then on he molested her, beat her, raped her and used her as a prostitute. We talk to Ursula Le Menn is from Osez le feminisme! a French feminist campaigning organisation and she knows family and friends of Valerie and also to Anne-Elisabeth Moutet a journalist based in Paris.

A new UK study suggests having Coronavirus around the time of birth may increase the chance of stillbirths and premature births. Scientists say while most pregnancies are not affected their findings should encourage pregnant women to have jabs as soon as they are eligible. We hear from Professor Asma Khalil who was the co-author of the research paper and also Dr Mary Ross Davie the Director of Professional Midwifery at the Royal College of Midwives.

Presenter: Emma Barnett

Producer: Lisa Jenkinson

Studio Engineers: Bob Nettles, Duncan Hannant.

Genre

Brand

Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

Weekend Woman’s Hour: We are Lady Parts, Environment Minister Rebecca Pow, Police abuse supercomplaint, Brit rising star Griff

BBC Radio 4
BBC Radio 4 logo
56 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

We are Lady Parts: the series about funny Muslim women, Environmental Minister Rebecca Pow

We are Lady Parts: the comedy TV series about funny Muslim women, Environmental Minister Rebecca Pow. Sharing experiences of infertility.

A TV comedy series featuring funny and bold Muslim women – ‘We Are Lady Parts’ is a new six part comedy series for Channel 4. It follows the highs and lows of the female punk band Lady Parts. Anita speaks to Anjana Vasan and series writer Nida Manzoor.

The Government has announced a range of measures to protect the environment, from banning peat in garden centres to increasing the rate of tree planting and reversing the loss of species diversity. A 10p charge on single-use plastic bags came into force in England on Friday. But what difference will these policies - and others made in the run-up to COP26 - make to the crisis facing nature and the climate? Emma speaks to Environment Minister Rebecca Pow.

Listener Clementine Baig was diagnosed with Primary Ovarian Insufficiency last year, and got in touch to share her experiences with infertility. She's joined by the Podcaster Noni Martins, whose husband was diagnosed with Male Factor Infertility in 2019, to explore how an infertility diagnosis can impact families, relationships and self-image.

Since a supercomplaint was made last year about domestic abuse by police officers, dozens more women have come forward to say they are affected. The centre for women's justice is still waiting for an outcome to its complaint. But wants the way these cases are dealt with to be drastically changed. We talk to a woman who suffered abuse from her police officer husband.

The terms polyamorous and consensually non-monogamous are increasingly normalised when it comes to relationships and dating. For some people, monogamy just doesn’t work for them. We hear from three people who all describe themselves as non-monogamous.

Twenty year old Griff is the recipient of this year’s prestigious BRITs Rising Star Award, following past winners such as Celeste, Sam Smith and Adele. Griff has also been nominated for an Ivor Novello award and ended 2020 by singing the sound-track for Disney's Christmas advert. She performs a special version of her song Black Hole for Woman’s Hour.

Presenter: Anita Rani

Producer: Dianne McGregor

Genre

Brand

Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

Women on nature, Prisons Minister Alex Chalk, We Are Lady Parts, How infertility diagnoses impact relationships.

BBC Radio 4
BBC Radio 4 logo
58 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Women's voices and women's lives - topical conversations to inform, challenge and inspire.

Prisons Minister Alex Chalk on how the Criminal Justice System treats women at 18, Women On Nature, We Are Lady Parts, how infertility diagnoses impact relationships.

New research shows that girls face unique and escalating risks as they turn 18. The transition from girlhood to adulthood could be an opportunity to get things right, but with little to no specialist support for young women as a group, it becomes a missed opportunity to prevent young women’s needs becoming more complex and entrenched. Anita is joined by Prisons and Probation Minister, Alex Chalk, Jessica Southgate, CEO of Agenda and by 21 year old, Dani, who, despite a chaotic childhood and being left with no support from 16, turned her life around.

A new anthology has just been published called Women on Nature. It includes women from the 14th century to the present day, fiction writers, poets, biographers, gardeners, farmers, theologians, artists and many more. Anita talks to the editor, writer Katharine Norbury, about her selection and why she thinks her anthology provides a fresh vision of the natural world and an alternative to conventional nature writing.

A TV comedy series featuring funny and bold Muslim women – a rarity you might say on our screens. Well ‘We Are Lady Parts’ is that rarity: a new six part comedy series for Channel 4 which began last night. It follows the highs and lows of the female punk band Lady Parts. We speak to Anjana Vasan and series writer Nida Manzoor.

On Woman's Hour, we are always keen to hear your stories. One listener, Clementine Baig was diagnosed with Primary Ovarian Insufficiency last year, and got in touch to share her experiences with infertility. She's joined by the Podcaster Noni Martins, whose husband was diagnosed with Male Factor Infertility in 2019, to explore how an infertility diagnosis can impact families, relationships and self-image.

Presented by Anita Rani

Producer: Frankie Tobi

Genre

Brand

Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

Women and sheds, Environment Minister Rebecca Pow, Rape threat insults, Declining birth rate in China

BBC Radio 4
BBC Radio 4 logo
58 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Women's voices and women's lives - topical conversations to inform, challenge and inspire.

Women and sheds with Joanne Harris, Environment Minister Rebecca Pow on the prospects for a greener future, rape threats used as common assault, the declining birth rate in China.

Since the beginning of the pandemic, shed sellers have seen a surge in demand - especially those that can be used as home offices. And existing summerhouses and garages have been commandeered, particularly by women, as a growing number expect to be working from home. Instagram is awash with images of so-called "She Sheds". Emma discusses the attraction with Joanne Harris who writes from her shed and Gill Heriz, author of A Woman's Shed.

What does it say about society when protestors threaten to rape their enemies’ mothers and daughters? This is what happened in North London at the weekend when protestors waving Palestinian flags passed through a Jewish community in Finchley. Four men have now been arrested on suspicion of racially aggravated public order offences. We look at the wider issue of how rape is threatened as a common insult, used for revenge in gangs and in the wider context of war. Emma talks to the writer and feminist activist Julie Bindel and to the historian Sir Antony Beevor.

This week the government has announced a range of measures to protect the environment, from banning peat in garden centres to increasing the rate of tree planting and reversing the loss of species diversity. A 10p charge on single-use plastic bags will also come into force on Friday. But what difference will these policies - and others made in the run-up to COP26 - make to the crisis facing nature and the climate? Emma Barnett speaks to Environment Minister Rebecca Pow.

Five years after China scrapped its one-child policy in favour of allowing families to have two children, the country's population growth has slumped to the lowest levels seen since the early 1960s. What's behind China's falling birth rate? We hear from Dr Ye Liu, a senior lecturer in international development at Kings College London.

Presented by Emma Barnett

Producer: Louise Corley

Image by Nicolette Hallett © CICO Books, taken from A Woman's Shed by Gill Heriz

Genre

Brand

Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

Police abuse supercomplaint, Alice in Wonderland Exhibition and Consensual non-monogamy

BBC Radio 4
BBC Radio 4 logo
58 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Is Alice in Wonderland the ultimate female icon for our times?

Emma speaks to a woman involved in the supercomplaint about domestic abuse by police officers and discusses whether Alice in Wonderland is a female icon.

Since the first publication of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland in 1865, the books have never been out of print and remain one of the most influential texts in the world. The Victoria and Albert Museum are opening their show Alice: Curiouser and Curiouser this Saturday, which explores why Alice is the ultimate female icon for our times, and how she continues to be such an enduring inspiration. The curator, Kate Bailey and artist and designer Kristjana Williams join Emma to discuss her appeal.

In the past, open-relationships might have conjured up the vision of keys in a bowl at the end of the night. But today, the terms polyamorous and consensually non-monogamous are increasingly normalised when it comes to relationships and dating. They describe people who are involved in, or are looking for relationships with more than one partner, with the understanding that one person cannot always be expected to meet all of your needs. And for some people, monogamy just doesn’t work for them. We hear from three people who all describe themselves as non-monogamous, about whether as a society we are accepting of open-relationships.

Since a supercomplaint was made last year about domestic abuse by police officers, dozens more women have come forward to say they are affected. The centre for women's justice is still waiting for an outcome to its complaint. But wants the way these cases are dealt with to be drastically changed. We talk to a woman who suffered abuse from her police officer husband. And to Nogah Ofer, the solicitor, woman who is leading the complaint.

Genre

Brand

Woman's Hour

Search Help.

To find all currently available programmes, do a completely empty search.

To find something specific, add your search term and hit enter. Optionally, combine your query with a variety of filters to narrow your results. You can also search by using just the filters and an empty search box.

Using Search Filters.

Media Type filter:
Limit your search to either TV or radio using the radio buttons. Results will show both by default.
Genre Accessibility and Availability filters:
Add or exclude search terms using the add and exclude filter icons.

When you've chosen your filters, hit enter or use the 'Apply Filters' button.

Once a search is returned, add or exclude further terms from the results page and search again. Search results can be reordered by:

  • first or last brodcast dates,
  • availability ending soon,
  • relevance.

Find out more about BBC Programme Explorer