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Tom Hanks; Alice Munro; Dana Schutz

BBC Radio 4
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Mark Lawson talks to Tom Hanks, star of Captain Phillips, a film about modern-day piracy.

Tom Hanks on the film Captain Phillips, the tale of a hijacking by Somali pirates; AS Byatt on Alice Munro, who today won the Nobel Prize for Literature; artist Dana Schutz.

With Mark Lawson.

Tom Hanks reflects on saying no to film offers, playing real people, and his latest role in Captain Phillips, which depicts the ordeal of Richard Phillips, captain of a cargo ship taken hostage by Somali pirates in 2009. Captain Phillips is directed by Paul Greengrass (United 93, The Bourne Supremacy).

It was announced today that Alice Munro has been awarded the 2013 Nobel Prize for Literature. AS Byatt and Hermione Lee discuss the Canadian author, who writes short stories rather than novels.

And Mark talks to the American artist Dana Schutz, whose colourful and fantastical paintings are on show at The Hepworth gallery in Wakefield.

Producer Timothy Prosser.

Credits

Presenter
Mark Lawson
Interviewed Guest
AS Byatt
Interviewed Guest
Tom Hanks
Interviewed Guest
Hermione Lee
Interviewed Guest
Dana Schutz
Producer
Timothy Prosser

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Tom Hollander, Emma Donoghue, Captain America: The Winter Soldier

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Arts news with John Wilson, including a review of Captain America: The Winter Soldier.

Arts news with John Wilson, including Tom Hollander on the return of Rev, author Emma Donoghue on her new book Frog Music, and a review of Captain America: The Winter Soldier.

With John Wilson

Tom Hollander on playing The Reverend Adam Smallbone as television sitcom Rev returns to our screens for a third series.

Emma Donoghue talks about 'Frog Music', her first novel since 'Room', and in a stark departure, her new book is set in 1876 in San Francisco, in the middle of a stifling heat wave and smallpox epidemic. Based on real events, the story opens with the murder of the eccentric Jenny Bonet, frog catcher and wearer of "mens' clothes" at a time when such a thing was illegal. Emma Donoghue tells John Wilson how the idea she first had 15 years ago, has finally come to fruition, and how she came to draw the conclusion that detectives at the time didn't.

The latest addition to the Marvel Comics film franchise is Captain America: The Winter Soldier, which sees Scarlett Johansson and Robert Redford take their part in the superhero battle between good and evil. Novelist Naomi Alderman reviews.

To mark Radio 4's forthcoming Character Invasion - when fictional characters will be taking over the network - Front Row asked five of Britain's leading actors to talk about their experience of playing an iconic character. To start us off, Dame Harriet Walter describes her experience of playing Lady Macbeth in a celebrated production of the play by the Royal Shakespeare Company in 1999.

Produced by Ella-mai Robey.

Credits

Presenter
John Wilson
Interviewed Guest
Tom Hollander
Interviewed Guest
Emma Donoghue
Interviewed Guest
Naomi Alderman
Interviewed Guest
Harriet Walter
Producer
Ella-mai Robey

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Chris Chibnall, Viktoria Mullova; Honour; Pangaea

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Broadchurch creator on his new play Worst Ever Wedding; Russian violinist Viktoria Mullova

Broadchurch creator Chris Chibnall on his new play, Russian violinist Viktoria Mullova, Shan Khan's Honour reviewed, and Pangaea, contemporary art from Africa and South America.

With John Wilson

Writer Chris Chibnall talks to John about his new play at the Salisbury Playhouse, Worst Ever Wedding, a comedy about a mother organising her daughter's wedding. Chris is best known for Broadchurch, the gripping TV series about a murder in a close community in Dorset. Chris discusses the step from writing heightened suspense to farcical comedy, and why featuring Dorset in his work is so important to him.

Author Kamila Shamsie reviews Shan Khan's directorial debut Honour, an urban thriller set in west London, starring Paddy Considine and Aiysha Hart. Mona is a young British Muslim girl on the run from her family after they find out about her relationship with a Punjabi boyfriend. In a bid to save their family honour, her mother and older brother hire a bounty hunter to help track Mona down.

Russian violinist Viktoria Mullova is widely recognised in classical music as one of the world's leading virtuosos and has recorded her first album of an eclectic range of Brazilian music - Stradivarius in Rio. She discusses her dramatic defection to the West in 1983, plus learning to improvise the music she played for her new album which was recorded in just two days, and with no rehearsals.

John visits Pangaea. Not the prehistoric supercontinent but the exhibition which hopes to reunite two of the continents which formed that landmass - Africa and South America - through contemporary art.

Produced by Ella-mai Robey.

Credits

Presenter
John Wilson
Interviewed Guest
Chris Chibnall
Interviewed Guest
Kamila Shamsie
Interviewed Guest
Viktoria Mullova
Producer
Ella-mai Robey

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Front Row

26/05/2009

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Arts news and reviews with John Wilson, including an interview with the artist Tracey Emin

Tracey Emin discusses her new exhibition; Lebanese Canadian writer Rawi Hage talks about his new novel and Horatio Clare reviews the film Sleep Furiously.

Tracey Emin discusses her new exhibition of drawings, neon, sewn work and sculpture as well as an animation made up of drawings of a woman masturbating.

Lebanese Canadian writer Rawi Hage won the IMPAC award for his debut novel De Niro's Game. He discusses his new book, Cockroach, which tells the story of a Middle Eastern immigrant to Canada: a misanthropic thief rescued from a suicide attempt who believes he is half-human, half-insect.

Horatio Clare reviews Sleep Furiously, the debut feature of Gideon Koppel. Set in a small farming community in mid-Wales, the film observes the rhythms of country life, with a soundtrack by Aphex Twin.

Performance artist Ansuman Biswas explains what he will be doing as Manchester Museum's first hermit in residence.

Credits

Interviewed Guest
Tracey Emin

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27/05/2009

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Colour at Tate Liverpool, Sandra Bernhard and Sarah Hall on the stones of Cumbria.

Arts news and reviews. Featuring colour at Tate Liverpool, Sandra Bernhard and Sarah Hall on the stones of Cumbria.

Arts news and reviews.

Colour Chart, a new exhibition at Tate Liverpool, explores the impact of commercially-produced colour on the art of the last sixty years. The art critic Tom Lubbock joins Mark Lawson to review how colour illuminated the work of a post-war generation of artists.

Mark meets the American comedy performer Sandra Bernhard, best known for her biting critiques of celebrities and politics, her friendship with Madonna and playing a lesbian in the sitcom Roseanne. She discusses her stand-up show, Without You I'm Nothing, and where she draws the line when looking for laughs.

In 2007, the writer Sarah Hall won the John Llewellyn Rhys Prize for her Cumbrian-based novel, The Carhullan Army. Her latest novel focuses on the same landscape but this time through the eyes of a painter who finds himself literally captivated by the Cumbrian rocks.

The Canadian short story writer Alice Munro has won the third Man Booker International Prize. Novelist Jane Smiley, a member of the judging panel, reveals the reasons for choosing Munro from a shortlist of fourteen renowned writers.

In 1989, the teenager John Davidson featured in a BBC documentary about Tourette syndrome, which showed him dealing with his involuntary violent body movements and outbursts of swearing. Twenty years on, a follow-up documentary revisits John as an adult, as well as fellow Tourette sufferer Greg Storey. TV critic Chris Dunkley discusses whether television's portrayal of strong subjects has changed in the past two decades.

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28/05/2009

BBC Radio 4
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Arts news and reviews. Hugh Laurie talks to Mark Lawson about his role in US drama House.

Arts news and reviews with Mark Lawson. Hugh Laurie discusses his role in US drama House and Ian Rankin reviews mathematical crime thriller Fermat's Room.

Arts news and reviews with Mark Lawson.

Hugh Laurie is returning to UK screens as Dr Gregory House. Laurie discusses playing an American and mastering the accent, whether he reads Stephen Fry's twitter updates and tells Mark Lawson that he would love to rekindle his comedy partnership with him.

Ian Rankin reviews Fermat's Room, a crime thriller in which four mathematicians are locked in a shrinking room. To save themselves from being crushed by the encroaching walls, they must solve maths questions.

New research shows that playing music to babies can help them cope with pain and feeding and there is news of a horse race to be run to a live musical soundtrack. Musician Paul Robertson discusses the beneficial effects of music on humans and animals.

With the news that TV cookery game show Come Dine With Me is being recreated by fans at home, comedy writer David Quantick reflects on the other formats that might take off at home even when the television is switched off.

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29/05/2009

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Kirsty Lang meets Sharon D Clarke, a talent-show judge turned performer in a musical.

Kirsty Lang and Stephen Armstrong review two new comedy series - Krod Mandoon and The Flaming Sword of Fire, and Mumbai Calling. Plus why more females are playing computer games.

Kirsty Lang and TV critic Stephen Armstrong review two new comedy series - Krod Mandoon and The Flaming Sword of Fire, and Mumbai Calling.

Female customers of videogame specialist shop, Game, have almost tripled in the last decade, with the gaming industry as a whole experiencing growth during the economic downturn. Children's writer Malorie Blackman and videogame consultant Margaret Robertson talk to Kirsty about how gaming seems to have finally reached the female market, and the growing sophistication of today's gaming world.

Kirsty also meets Sharon D Clarke, who has gone from being a talent-show judge to a performer in a musical.

With three films currently on release which set puzzles for their protagonists, Andrew Collins considers the kind of brainteasers audiences could decode.

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25/05/2009

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Arts news and reviews with John Wilson, with Island Records founder Chris Blackwell.

Arts news and reviews. Chris Blackwell, who founded Island Records 50 years ago in Kingston, Jamaica, talks to John Wilson about the history of the label.

John Wilson meets Chris Blackwell, who founded the Island Records label 50 years ago.

Blackwell is an unlikely music mogul. Born into a wealthy white family in Jamaica, he started out recording local musicians on the island. In the early 1960s he moved to London, selling discs to the Caribbean communities from the back of his car.

An international hit record - My Boy Lollipop by Millie Small - transformed his fortunes. The Island label expanded, signing a wide range of rock and acoustic artists, including John Martyn, Free and Cat Stevens, and turning performers such as Bob Marley into global stars.

Chris talks to John about his childhood in Jamaica and his rebellious years at an English boarding school. He remembers the moment when a group of Rastafarians saved his life, and recalls his very first meeting with Bob Marley - an encounter which would transform the status of Jamaican music around the world.

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16/06/2009

BBC Radio 4
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Includes a review of The Take and composer Michael Berkeley inspired by humpback whales.

Arts news and reviews with Mark Lawson. Including a report from The Wedgwood Museum, Stoke-on-Trent, shortlisted for the 2009 Art Fund Prize for museums and galleries.

Arts news and reviews.

Nina Bawden's novel, Carrie's War, was based on her own experiences of being evacuated to a Welsh mining village during WWII. Now, as a stage production of Carrie's War starring Prunella Scales opens in London's West End, Nina Bawden shares her memories and explains how evacuation politicised her forever.

The Take is the latest big-budget Sky 1 TV drama, an adaptation of a novel by bestselling author Martina Cole. Set in the criminal underworld of London's East End, The Take follows the fortunes of the Jackson family across a decade that takes in the height of Thatcherism through to the birth of New Labour. Crime novelist Dreda Say Mitchell reviews the drama.

Mark Lawson reports from The Wedgwood Museum near Stoke-on-Trent, one of four shortlisted contenders for the 2009 Art Fund Prize. Director Gaye Blake Roberts explains the long struggle to re-house the collection and archives of Josiah Wedgwood & Sons, and local MP Mark Fisher discusses the importance of the museum to Stoke's history.

The premiere is taking place of a new piece by composer Michael Berkeley, inspired by the sounds of humpback whales. As Berkeley started composing the piece, his family friend Gabriel Bailey died, at the age of 21; shortly after that, the conductor Richard Hickox, a long time friend and collaborator of Berkeley, also died. The composition is dedicated to the memory of both men. Michael Berkeley talks to Mark about the sad chain of events which led to this piece.

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17/06/2009

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Arts news and reviews with Mark Lawson. Mark meets musician Bobby McFerrin.

Arts news and reviews with Mark Lawson. Including a report on the Ruthin Craft Centre, Denbighshire, a contender for the 2009 Art Fund Prize for museums and galleries.

Singer Bobby McFerrin, visiting the UK to take part in Ornette Colman's Meltdown festival at the Royal Festival Hall in London, meets Mark Lawson to discuss audience participation and his new wordless and improvised opera, Bobble.

Mark Lawson visits the Ruthin Craft Centre in Denbighshire to hear from artist Andrew Logan and the centre's director, Philip Hughes, about why the gallery has been shortlisted for this year's Art Fund Prize for Best Museum and Gallery in the UK.

Following the High Court's ruling that anonymous bloggers have no right to keep their identities secret, lawyer Duncan Lamont considers the implications of individuals no longer able to hide behind fabricated identities, online, in literature and in the art gallery.

Plus, Front Row's resident crime reviewer Jeff Park makes his selection of US and UK thrillers.

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18/06/2009

BBC Radio 4
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Including news of the winner of the 2009 Art Fund Prize for museums and galleries.

Lord Puttnam announces this year's Art Fund Prize winner, music from The Proclaimers, Janet Street Porter on two new art exhibitions and a review of WWII film Katyn.

The 2009 winner of The Art Fund Prize

Lord Puttnam announces that The Wedgwood Museum in Stoke-on-Trent is this year's winner of the 100, 000 pound Art Fund Prize for museums and galleries.

The Proclaimers

Craig and Charlie Reid, better known as The Proclaimers, enjoyed huge success in the late '80s with hits including I'm Gonna Be (500 Miles), Letter From America and King of the Road. This week sees the release of their new studio album Notes & Rhymes, so they brought their guitar to the Front Row studio to give us a flavour of their new work.

Radical Nature at the Barbican and Richard Long at Tate Britain

At the Barbican Art Gallery in London, an exhibition, Radical Nature: Art and Architecture for a Changing Planet 1969-2009, involves a number of installations that include foliage, grass and mud. At Tate Britain, Richard Long's exhibition Heaven and Earth features his familiar large flint circles, his mud paintings and photos of the British landscape. Janet Street Porter, Vice-Chair of the Ramblers Association, gives her response to both exhibitions.

Katyn

The Polish film director Andrzej Wajda's father was killed with the 20,000 Polish officers murdered by the Russian secret police in the Katyn forest during the Second World War. His Oscar-nominated feature film Katyn, which includes documentary archive, is being released in the UK. Critic Sarah Crompton gives her response to the film.

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19/06/2009

BBC Radio 4
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Neil Sedaka, Hitchcock's sexual iconography and saxophones on the street.

Kirsty Lang's guest is Neil Sedaka. She also debates sexual iconography in films used by the likes of Hitchcock, saxophones on the street and the trouble with British dance.

Arts news and reviews.

At the age of seventy, many singer-songwriters would be putting together Greatest Hits albums, but Neil Sedaka is celebrating 57 years in the business with a UK tour as well as a CD release that includes eleven new songs. He discusses his creative versatility with Kirsty Lang and describes the highlights of his prolific career, from his early training as a classical pianist to his time in the Brill Building hit-factory and, later, how Elton John rescued him from being out-of-favour with the young public. He also reveals that preparations are afoot for a stage musical about his life, with a reality TV series to find the performer who will play the role of Neil himself.

Alfred Hitchcock's romantic thriller North by Northwest, starring Cary Grant and Eva Marie Saint, is returning to the big screen. It contains many memorable virtuoso set pieces, including some sizzling scenes of sexual banter between Grant and Saint on a train; when the couple finally get together the camera cuts away to a famous shot of the train entering a tunnel. Film historian Ian Christie discusses examples of cinematic sexual imagery from the days when censorship forbade anything too explicit.

Eight hundred saxophonists are taking to the streets of London to perform an epic musical endeavour: The Leviathan, composed by saxophonist John Harle. Harle's varied career has seen him turn his hand to everything from Harrison Birtwistle premieres to composing the theme tune for thriller series Silent Witness. He talks to Kirsty Lang about the practicalities of pulling off such a large scale musical project.

Is British dance too insular and biased against women choreographers? Choreographer Siobhan Davies discusses the state of British contemporary dance with John Ashford, who is stepping down after running The Place for over twenty years.

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15/06/2009

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:

With John Wilson. Plus: 80s food, a review of the film Telstar. The Parthenon Marbles.

Arts news and reviews. With Sue Perkins and Giles Coren on culinary surprises from the past, the latest research on the Parthenon Marbles and David Hepworth's verdict on Telstar.

Arts news and reviews.

Comedian Sue Perkins and food critic Giles Coren are returning for a new series of Supersizers, the programme which sees the twosome trying out the culinary offerings of the past. John Wilson talks to them about everything from 1980s pop tarts to the Roman delicacy of pig's uterus.

New scientific research has proven, for the first time, that the statues and friezes of the Parthenon were painted in a variety of colours, rather than left as pristine white marble. John Wilson is shown how infrared light has helped reveal tiny traces of pigment on the British Museum's Parthenon Marbles, which were controversially removed by the Earl of Elgin two centuries ago.

Telstar is Nick Moran's feature film directorial debut and tells the story of maverick 1960s record producer Joe Meek, who enjoyed huge success with Telstar (the biggest selling record of its time) and whose life later descended into tragedy through drug addiction and mental illness. Music journalist David Hepworth reviews the film.

Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum in Glasgow has been nominated for the 'Museum of the Year' award by the Art Fund Prize for the second time. John Wilson reports from The Centre Of New Enlightenment (TCONE), an interactive programme in which children are sent on a series of missions around the museum, collecting data and responding to artefacts.

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Harper Lee remembered, The Night Manager, Simon Armitage, Zelda

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Harper Lee remembered, and John le Carre's The Night Manager adapted for TV.

Arts news with Kirsty Lang. Harper Lee, author of To Kill a Mockingbird and Go Set a Watchman, is remembered by Elaine Showalter and Christopher Bigsby.

Novelist Harper Lee, author of To Kill a Mockingbird and Go Set a Watchman, is remembered by Elaine Showalter and Christopher Bigsby.

John le Carré's novel The Night Manager has been adapted for television by Danish director Susanne Bier and writer David Farr. A spy thriller set in the shadowy world of the arms trade they describe how they changed the sex of the main character, and brought a Scandinavian flavour to this very British writer.

Poet Simon Armitage and director Paul Hunter discuss collaborating on I Am Thomas, a piece of music theatre about the last person in Britain to be executed for blasphemy.

Nintendo's Zelda franchise, one of the most successful video game series of all time, celebrates its 30th anniversary this Sunday. Naomi Alderman tells us what she admires most about the game.

Credits

Presenter
Kirsty Lang
Interviewed Guest
Elaine Showalter
Interviewed Guest
Christopher Bigsby
Interviewed Guest
Susanne Bier
Interviewed Guest
David Farr
Interviewed Guest
Paul Hunter
Interviewed Guest
Simon Armitage
Interviewed Guest
Naomi Alderman
Producer
Angie Nehring

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Naughty Boy, Best of Enemies, Bellowhead

BBC Radio 4
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Naughty Boy discusses the BBC Asian Network Prom. John Wilson presents.

Naughty Boy discusses the BBC Asian Network Prom, the televised debates between Gore Vidal and William F Buckley in Best of Enemies, and Bellowhead at WOMAD. With John Wilson.

DJ, songwriter and producer Naughty Boy on the Late Night Prom that marks the 50th anniversary this year of Asian Programmes on the BBC.

Bellowhead, one of the UK's most successful folk bands, announced last month that they are going to split up after eleven years together. As they prepare to play at The WOMAD Festival, two of the band's original members, John Spiers and Jon Boden, reflect on more than a decade of music making and the state of contemporary folk music.

A new film documentary Best of Enemies charts the explosive series of televised debates between the liberal writer Gore Vidal and the conservative and Republican William F Buckley when they were broadcast during the 1968 Democratic and Republican conventions in the US. Guardian writer Jonathan Freedland reviews the film about the clashing egos and their mutual distrust and enmity.

And this year marks the 150th anniversary of the death of Elizabeth Gaskell. The Elizabeth Gaskell Collection at the John Rylands Library, Manchester University, has just been digitised. Archivist Fran Baker talks about the collection's treasures that can now be seen online.

Presenter: John Wilson

Producer: Sarah Johnson.

Credits

Presenter
John Wilson
Interviewed Guest
undefined Naughty Boy
Interviewed Guest
John Spiers
Interviewed Guest
Jon Boden
Interviewed Guest
Jonathan Freedland
Interviewed Guest
Fran Baker
Producer
Sarah Johnson

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Front Row

21/12/2020

BBC Radio 4
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28 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Live magazine programme on the worlds of arts, literature, film, media and music

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Germaine Greer, Anthony Browne, Beryl Bainbridge reviewed

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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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With Mark Lawson. Beryl Bainbridge's last novel and Germaine Greer on Australian Art.

Mark Lawson reviews the novel which Beryl Bainbridge left unfinished at her death last year. Germaine Greer discusses Australian Art; and is The Hangover II a welcome film sequel?

When Beryl Bainbridge died in July 2010, she left a novel almost completed. The Girl in the Polka Dot Dress draws on a trip she made to America in 1968, the year when Robert Kennedy was assassinated. Sarah Churchwell reviews.

Germaine Greer discusses the selection of artwork in Out of Australia: Prints and Drawings from Sidney Nolan to Rover Thomas which is part of the British Museum's Australian Season. Curator Stephen Coppel responds to her views.

Anthony Browne's role as Children's Laureate comes to an end next month. He discusses the importance of drawing, and reflects on the autobiography through pictures which he has co-written with his son, which is called Playing the Shape Game.

The Hangover Part II is a sequel to the successful film starring Bradley Cooper, Ed Helms and Zach Galifianakis, which saw them lose the groom and acquire a tiger on a stag night in Las Vegas. This time they travel to Thailand. Matt Thorne reviews.

Producer Robyn Read.

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Film producer Peter Bart on the making of The Godfather

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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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Film producer Peter Bart on the stories behind films such as The Godfather.

With John Wilson. Film producer Peter Bart reveals stories behind films such as The Godfather, and arts administrators on why it is worth sending artists to the Venice Biennale.

With John Wilson.

Film executive Peter Bart reveals stories behind the making of films including The Great Gatsby, The Godfather and Don't Look Now, as detailed in his memoirs, Infamous Players.

After the huge critical success of his TV series The Wire, set in Baltimore, writer David Simon turned to New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina for his series Treme, which focuses on the fate of musicians in the city. Robin Denselow reviews Treme as it arrives on DVD.

Music entrepreneur Alan McGee discusses the rollercoaster story of his label Creation Records, home of the band Oasis.

As the Venice Biennale begins, Grainne Sweeney, creative director of The National Glass Centre, Sunderland, and Mark Segal, director of Artsway's New Forest Pavilion, explain why they are investing money in sending artists to exhibit there.

Producer: Rebecca Nicholson.

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James Corden on stage; Martin and Eliza Carthy

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Mark Lawson meets Martin and Eliza Carthy and reviews James Corden in a Goldoni comedy.

Mark Lawson reviews James Corden on stage, talks to folk musicians Martin and Eliza Carthy and Stephen Poliakoff discusses an exhibition profiling Jewish entertainers.

With Mark Lawson, including an interview with folk musician Martin Carthy, who has just celebrated his 70th birthday. He and his daughter Eliza perform Farewell Sweet Nancy in the Front Row studio.

James Corden returns to the National Theatre, where he appeared in The History Boys. Nicholas Hytner directs him in One Man, Two Guvnors, Richard Bean's new version of Goldoni's comedy. Gaylene Gould reviews.

Dramatist Stephen Poliakoff discusses an exhibition profiling Jewish entertainers in Britain on stage, screen and in music.

Producer: Andrea Kidd.

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26/05/2011

BBC Radio 4
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
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With Mark Lawson, including an interview with actor Rob Lowe, as he publishes a memoir.

With Mark Lawson, including an interview with the actor Rob Lowe, whose screen career began over 30 years ago, and whose roles include Sam Seaborn in the TV drama The West Wing.

With Mark Lawson, including an interview with the actor Rob Lowe, whose screen career began over 30 years ago, and whose roles include Sam Seaborn in the TV drama The West Wing.

James Bond has been brought to life again in a new novel from American writer Jeffery Deaver. He discusses getting to grips with English phrases and bringing back old Bond characters in Carte Blanche.

As American politician Sarah Palin is compared to Joan of Arc by one of her supporters, we reflect on comparisons between politicians and famous characters: including Cameron / Flashman and Thatcher / Boadicea.

Producer: India Rakusen.

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