Showing results for your search filters

Leading Edge

The Philosophy of Morals and Docile Dinosaurs

BBC Radio 4
BBC Radio 4 logo
30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:

Do we make moral judgements based on societal rules or based on our emotions?

Geoff Watts reports on the latest stories from the world of science and technology. Do we make moral judgements based on societal rules or based on our emotions?

The Philosophy of Morals

Do we make moral judgements based on societal rules or based on our emotions?

Geoff finds out from Marc Hauser, Professor of Psychology at Harvard University.

Docile Dinosaurs

A new 95 million-year-old dinosaur species discovery was reported this week. Professor David Varricchio explains how the find puts paid to some stereotypes.

Classroom Cacophony

Acoustic engineer Trevor Cox of Salford University wants a rethink of classroom soundscapes.

Desert pools

The diverse array of microbes in Mexican desert pools may help biologists to find out how life on early Earth got started. Molly Bentley reports from the Great Chihuahuan Desert.

Mechanochemistry

Geoff talks to Professor Jeffrey Moore from the University of Illinois about a novel branch of chemistry which uses mechanical force to change the properties of a substance.

Brand

Leading Edge

Click On

Series 1 Episode 3

BBC Radio 4
BBC Radio 4 logo
30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:

Rajesh Mirchandani takes a look at the social side of digital technology.

It's the time of year when people are thinking about relationships, so Rajesh Mirchandani takes a look at the social side of digital technology.

BBC Radio 4
BBC Radio 4 logo
30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:

Former government chief scientist, Lord May, looks at the role of politics in science.

Former government chief scientist and president of the Royal Society, Lord May, examines the crucial but uneasy relationship between politics and science.

Climate change, medicine, the food we eat, the way we give birth, the way we die. Science governs every aspect of our lives. But can we trust politicians to make the right decisions for us about those vital issues? Former government chief scientist and president of the Royal Society, Lord May, examines the crucial but uneasy relationship between politics and science.

The Sky at Night

Beyond the Visible

Audio Described
BBC Four
BBC Four logo
29 minutes Available for 7 months First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

How vision-impaired astronomers are able to see the universe.

The Sky at Night team discovers the new techniques being pioneered by vision-impaired astronomers to see the universe, using their senses of hearing and touch.

The focus for this edition of The Sky at Night is on astronomical research that is beyond the scope of our eyes.

We think of astronomy as something we do primarily using our sight. But we can now search the cosmos using radiation beyond the narrow band of visible light, beyond what we are able to see.

We visit the UK’s foremost radio observatory, Jodrell Bank, and meet some remarkable, vision-impaired astronomers who are pioneering new techniques to carry out their research using their senses of hearing and touch.

Credits

Presenter
Maggie Aderin-Pocock
Presenter
Chris Lintott
Presenter
Pete Lawrence
Presenter
Lucie Green
Production Coordinator
Hannah Cheriton
Production Manager
Kassi Jones
Assistant Producer
Angel Li
Editor
Sally Yeadon
Executive Producer
Steve Crabtree
Producer
Toby Macdonald
Director
Toby Macdonald
BBC Radio 4
BBC Radio 4 logo
30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:

Paul Bennun finds out how Free and Open Source software is making its impact felt.

Paul Bennun finds out how Free and Open Source software is making its impact felt across the world, fuelling development and saving small businesses millions of pounds.

Leading Edge

The Genome of the Rhesus Macaque Monkey and the Pterosaur Puzzle

BBC Radio 4
BBC Radio 4 logo
30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:

Geoff Watts reports on the sequencing of the genome of the rhesus macaque monkey.

Geoff Watts reports on the latest stories from the world of science and technology. Including a brand new insight into how humans are genetically different from our primate relatives.

Macaque Map of Life

Researchers have just finished sequencing the genome of the rhesus macaque monkey, providing brand new insight into how humans are genetically different from our primate relatives.

Pterosaur Puzzle

Geoff visits a wind tunnel in Cambridge where researchers are testing out models of giant pterosaurs, which died out 65 million years ago, in an attempt to solve one of nature’s longest running mysteries of flight.

Space Cycle

Jon Stewart takes a ride on a space cycle at the University of California at Irvine, to see if he’s got what it takes to be an astronaut.

Economic Equality

Why it is that people will spend their own money to make the rich less rich and the poor less poor without any hope of personal gain?

Brand

Leading Edge

Digital Planet

Dispelling COVID-19 vaccine myths online

BBC World Service
BBC World Service logo
44 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Dispelling COVID-19 vaccine myths online – should social media platforms be doing more?

Dispelling vaccine misinformation online. Also God of Mars, the first film to use Games tech for special effects and seeing the value behind data.

Thousands of people in the UK have now received the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine and vaccinations have just started in Canada, yet despite promotion from the government, a recent survey shows many people are reluctant to have it. Part of this hesitation is due to misinformation and vaccine myths on social media. Anna-Sophie Harling Managing Director for Europe at NewsGuard– the trust tool web extension provider – talks about their special report on top COVID-19 vaccine myths online. Many of these myths have been circulating online for months so how can governments dispel these falsehoods and convince their populations to be vaccinated?

God of Mars PKGE:

Production has just started on the world’s first feature-length film to be shot with video game technology. “Gods of Mars” uses something called “the Unreal Engine”, which is normally used to make games like Fortnite and Gears of War. But this time it’s creating all the film’s special effects and virtual environments… from rocket ships to robots! It’s hoped that this kind of technology could save film-makers huge amounts of money. Chris Berrow has been taking a look for us.

Data Action

In her new book, “Data Action,” Associate Professor Sarah Williams from MIT issues a call for thinking ethically about data today. She’s on the programme to warn of the possibilities of using data for bias and segregation and how we need to learn to see the value behind the numbers.

The programme is presented by Gareth Mitchell with expert commentary from Ghislaine Boddington.

(Image: Getty Images)

Studio Manager: John Boland

Producer: Ania Lichtarowicz

Click

Stormzy Enters the Game

BBC News Channel
BBC News Channel logo
30 minutes Available for 8 months First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Click talks to grime star Stormzy about his role in a forthcoming video game.

Click talks to grime star Stormzy about his role in the forthcoming video game Watch Dogs: Legion, he appears as a fictional version of himself in the game.

Click talks to grime star Stormzy about his role in the forthcoming video game Watch Dogs: Legion. The Glastonbury headliner appears as a fictional version of himself in the game, which is set in a dystopian near-future London that has been taken over by a rogue government. He speaks about using the game to speak out against injustice.

Credits

Presenter
Marc Cieslak
Interviewed Guest
Stormzy

Brand

Click

Click

An American Horror Story?

BBC News Channel
BBC News Channel logo
30 minutes Available for 8 months First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Ahead of the US election, we report on the use of technology in the voting process.

Ahead of the US presidential election, we report from states that are trialling technology in order to help more people vote. And we meet Pip Hare before she sets sail to circumnavigate the globe.

Ahead of the US presidential election, we report from states that are trialling technology in order to help more people vote. And we take a view around the world to see if greater use of tech in the voting process could lead to increased turnout.

In just over a week, sailor Pip Hare is to set off attempting to beat Dame Ellen MacArthur's record for circumnavigating the globe alone. To try to achieve this, she of course has a high-tech boat. It is decked out in kit designed to track her mental health throughout the voyage. We went to meet Pip before she sets sail.

Brand

Click

Click On

Series 1 Episode 4

BBC Radio 4
BBC Radio 4 logo
30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:

Rajesh Mirchandani investigates just how many people are using unsecured Wi-Fi networks.

Rajesh Mirchandani investigates just how many people are using unsecured Wi-Fi networks, challenges the users and businesses who are leaving themselves open to hackers.

Rajesh Mirchandani presents a series covering the latest developments and issues in the world of IT.

He investigates just how many people are using unsecured Wi-Fi networks - challenging the users and businesses who are leaving themselves open to hackers involved in illegal activities, including downloading child pornography and online banking details theft.

Rajesh also questions the use of Open Source software and considers the benefits and drawbacks for the voluntary sector where money saved on software may not offset the higher costs of IT support.

Leading Edge

Reports from the American Association for the Advancement of Science

BBC Radio 4
BBC Radio 4 logo
30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:

Reports from the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

Geoff Watts reports from the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Geoff Watts reports from the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science – the year's most important gathering discussing the latest research from a vast range of science medical and technological fields.

Global warming

New research provides dramatic evidence of climate change. Lonnie Thompson of Ohio State University reveals his latest findings for the Quelccaya ice cap in Peru.

Infant memory

Scientists have often been puzzled by our inability as adults to remember events from early life. Recent studies have shown that infants DO form memories, so why do we fail to hang on to them?

Bionics and the brain

Bionic eyes and replacement electronic arms are two of the latest smart prosthetics currently being trialled in patients to restore lost function after injury.

Geoff hears how the adaptability of our brain in learning how to work with this new technology has been largely underestimated.

Maths and the visual arts

Mathematics is being used to decipher distinct statistical signatures from an artists work. This offers new insights into a consistency of style and could help uncover fakes.

Brand

Leading Edge

Leading Edge

Spaceflight and Weightlessness

BBC Radio 4
BBC Radio 4 logo
30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Geoff Watts finds out the use of experiments in weightlessness, similar to being in orbit.

Geoff Watts finds out why people need to fly into space and the use of scientific experiments in weightlessness.

It has been a good month for spaceflight, with the launch of robotic telescopes, a successful servicing mission to the Hubble Space Telescope and the selection of a British astronaut. But what is the value of human spaceflight and why has the UK resisted subscribing to it for so long? Geoff Watts puts those questions to astronauts, scientists and politicians.

Jonathan Amos reports from Paris where the European Space Agency has just announced its selection of six new astronauts, including British Army helicopter pilot Major Tim Peake. Jacques Dourdain, head of ESA, says he hopes it will lead to a UK contribution to ESA's human spaceflight programme, but David Williams, Director of the British National Space Centre, says that this is not a priority.

Space physiologist Dr Kevin Fong explains his interest in space and the long-term effects of microgravity on the human body. Former space shuttle astronaut Jeff Hoffman, now Professor of Astronautics at MIT, describes the sensation of spaceflight, explains why astronauts need patience and outlines the first and last Hubble Space Telescope servicing missions.

The BBC's Martin Redfern joins scientists from the European Space Agency for their 50th in a series of what they call 'parabolic flight campaigns'. It used to be known as the vomit comet, though now it is an Airbus A300. It flies out over the Atlantic and then free-falls for 22 seconds. The result is weightlessness, a brief taste of conditions in orbit. The cycle is repeated 30 times each flight. But what can researchers hope to achieve in such brief bursts of zero-G?

Geoff Watts also discusses the value of microgravity research and human spaceflight and hears how zero-gravity flights might come to the UK.

Brand

Leading Edge

Leading Edge

Attitudes to Darwin

BBC Radio 4
BBC Radio 4 logo
30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Geoff Watts investigates attitudes to evolution.

Geoff Watts examines attitudes to Darwin and his theory of evolution, both during his own time and in the present.

Geoff Watts examines attitudes to Darwin and his theory of evolution, both during his own time and now. Even today, 150 years after it was first published, Darwin's theory of evolution by natural selection arouses passions. Indeed, for some it seems just as controversial now as it was in Victorian times.

Geoff is joined by Dr Eugenie Scott, Director of the US National Center for Science Education, which has challenged attempts to teach creationism in American schools, and by Dr Denis Alexander, Director of the Faraday Institute for Science and Religion in Cambridge. He is co-author of a recent report in which he seeks to 'rescue Darwin' from the crossfire between atheists and creationists.

Dame Gillian Beer, Emeritus Professor of English Literature at the University of Cambridge and author of Darwin's Plots: Evolutionary Narrative in Darwin, George Eliot and Nineteenth-Century Fiction, describes how Darwin's own cautious attitude to human evolution and the value of religion changed over the years.

Plus a report from a Darwin exhibition in Turkey and a creationist museum in the USA, highlighting the front line in the battle for public acceptance between evolutionary science and creationist religion.

Brand

Leading Edge
BBC Radio 4
BBC Radio 4 logo
30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:

Dr Mark Lythgoe investigates the divide between scientists and artists (1/2).

1/2. Neuroscientist and arts enthusiast Dr Mark Lythgoe investigates the divide between scientists and artists, lamented by C P Snow in a lecture nearly 50 years ago.

Leading Edge

The First Forests and Minimising Earthquake Damage

BBC Radio 4
BBC Radio 4 logo
30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:

A 385 million year old complete fossil tree sheds light on the world’s earliest forests.

The discovery of a 385 million year old complete fossil tree sheds light on the appearance of the world’s earliest forests. Palaeobotanist Christopher Berry reveals more.

The First Forests

The discovery of a 385 million year old complete fossil tree sheds light on the appearance of the world’s earliest forests. Palaeobotanist Christopher Berry reveals more.

Minimising Earthquake Damage

Adam Crewe explains his extraordinarily simple method of reinforcing walls to make them proof against collapse during an earthquake.

In Praise of Water

Author Marcus Chown examines where we should be looking for signs of life as we do and don't know it.

Smart Dust

News from this week's Royal Astronomical Society meeting in Preston on a new approach to planetary exploration. Geoff speaks to Professor John Barker about tiny "smart" devices that can be borne on the wind like dust particles, and carried in space probes to explore other planets.

Uranus Discoveries – Old News?

Satellite technology scientist Stuart Eves re-evaluates whether astronomer William Herschel discovered the ring around our seventh planet as long ago as 1797?

Brand

Leading Edge

Click On

Series 1 Episode 1

BBC Radio 4
BBC Radio 4 logo
30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:

Series covering the latest developments and issues in information technology.

Rajesh Mirchandani presents a series covering the latest developments and issues in the world of IT. He asks whether companies are doing enough to protect their online customers.

Rajesh Mirchandani presents a series covering the latest developments and issues in the world of IT. He investigates internet security, asking if companies are doing enough to protect their online customers. And is it possible to be technologically knowledgeable and environmentally friendly at the same time?

Click On

Series 1 Episode 2

BBC Radio 4
BBC Radio 4 logo
30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:

The Home of the Future has been with us since the 1950s, so why don't we live there yet?

The Home of the Future has been with us since the 1950s, so why don't we live there yet? Rajesh Mirchandani explores what's getting in the way of integrating gadgets.

The Home of the Future has been with us since the 1950s, so why don't we live there yet? With a huge choice of PCs, TVs, wireless modems, MP3 players and mobiles currently available, Rajesh explores what's getting in the way of integrating these gadgets - enabling them to talk to each other to create a fully connected home.

Also, Rajesh's dad explains why, at the age of 80, he's glad he has his computer, while Rajesh takes a look at exciting developments in replacing keyboard technology which will allow greater access to the internet for people with disabilities.

Leading Edge

Climate Change and Himalayan Stargazing

BBC Radio 4
BBC Radio 4 logo
30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:

Geoff Watts reports on new research on climate change.

Geoff Watts reports on new research that suggests that the world’s current climates may disappear if global warming trends continue, while weather unlike any seen today would be created.

A Whole New Climate

When we talk of global warming, we tend to think of things as they are now, but a bit hotter. However, new research suggests that the world’s current climates may disappear if global warming trends continue, while weather unlike any seen today would be created. Professor Jack Williams of the University of Wisconsin explains.

A Mammal Family Tree

Kate Jones of the Zoological Society of London describes a new super-tree of mammalian evolution. This family tree throws doubt on the theory that the demise of the dinosaurs paved the way for the rise of mammals, suggesting that they evolved some 15 million years later.

Himalayan Stargazing

The Hanle Observatory is the world’s highest altitude telescope, four and a half thousand metres above sea level, in the Himalayan desert. Geoff reports from the observatory's control centre, miles away in Bangalore.

New Ideas for New Stars

Professor Gerry Gilmore of the Institute of Astronomy in Cambridge ponders the frustratingly slow development of our grasp of galactic evolution, while new galaxies are being discovered all the time.

A History of Plate Tectonics

Professor Minik Rosing from the University of Copenhagen explains why he and his colleagues think they can answer the question of when the movement of plate tectonics, which has shaped our continents, began. It's a question which has been fascinating geologists for years.

Brand

Leading Edge

Leading Edge

Episode 7: Fossil Findings in China and Corn as a Biofuel

BBC Radio 4
BBC Radio 4 logo
30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:

Geoff Watts reports on new fossil findings in China.

Geoff Watts reports on the latest stories from the world of science and technology. Including how recent fossil findings in China could shed light on how our ancestors colonised the East.

Out of Africa

Professor Erik Trinkhaus explains how recent fossil findings in China could shed light on how our ancestors colonised the East.

Doggy DNA

Research into the genetic make up of man’s best friend has isolated a gene which plays a major role in determining the vast range of size differences amongst dog breeds. Geoff talks to biologist Nathan Sutter.

No to Corn as a Biofuel

Biologist Chris Somerville explains why he thinks corn is not suitable as a fuel crop.

Perpetual Motion

There’s no such thing as a free lunch in physics according to Mark Lewney.

Dartsboard deductions

Mathematicians claim to have worked out the ideal strategy to generate high scores in darts. Gareth Mitchell investigates.

Brand

Leading Edge

Tech Tent

06/11/2015 15:06 GMT: Spotting Unicorns in Dublin

BBC World Service
BBC World Service logo
23 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Rory Cellan-Jones reports from the annual Web Summit in Ireland's capital, Dublin.

Rory Cellan-Jones talks to Nicolas Brusson of BlaBlaCar, and Ambarish Mitra of Blippar, founders of two European "Unicorns" - companies valued at over a billion dollars. Plus Kickstarter's CEO Yancey Strickler tells why he thinks crowdfunding is only just getting going, and Nell Watson, Futurist at California's Singularity University predicts the power of Augmented Reality. Recorded at the Web Summit in Ireland's capital, Dublin.

(Photo: Yancey Strickler of Kickstarter being photographed by Rory Cellan-Jones).

Brand

Tech Tent

Search Help.

To find all currently available programmes, do a completely empty search.

To find something specific, add your search term and hit enter. Optionally, combine your query with a variety of filters to narrow your results. You can also search by using just the filters and an empty search box.

Using Search Filters.

Media Type filter:
Limit your search to either TV or radio using the radio buttons. Results will show both by default.
Genre Accessibility and Availability filters:
Add or exclude search terms using the add and exclude filter icons.

When you've chosen your filters, hit enter or use the 'Apply Filters' button.

Once a search is returned, add or exclude further terms from the results page and search again. Search results can be reordered by:

  • first or last brodcast dates,
  • availability ending soon,
  • relevance.

Find out more about BBC Programme Explorer