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World Routes

World Routes in China World Routes in China -Part 1: Music of the Hani and Yi People

Lucy Duran explores the music of the Hani and Yi people in Yunnan Province, China.

Exploring the music of three of China's 56 different ethnic groups, Lucy Duran focuses on songs of the Hani and Yi people in Yunnan Province.

In a programme recorded on location in China, Lucy Duran explores the music of three of the country's 56 different ethnic groups. Featuring the songs of the Hani and Yi people in Yunnan Province. Living high up in the mountains near the borders with Vietnam, Laos and Burma, they make instruments from grass to accompany songs that were born in the world's most spectacular paddy fields.

World Routes

An Appalachian Road Trip Episode 2: North Carolina

Banning Eyre meets traditional US musicians and singers from around North Carolina.

Writer and musician Banning Eyre travels across the state of North Carolina to hear the music and the stories of the older generation of US traditional musicians.

Following his experiences at the Mount Airy Fiddlers Convention writer and musician Banning Eyre embarks on a journey across the state of North Carolina to hear the music and stories of some of the older players and singers who can trace a direct line back to before the age of the radio and the gramophone, to when Old Time music was a strictly oral tradition.

Banning meets 90 year old fiddler Jo Thomson, who is perhaps the only known surviving Old Time African-American string band player. His playing and stories capture a period of time before this music was delineated on race grounds, of a time when both black and white string bands flourished.

Sat out on her porch on top of a mountain near Mars Hill, eighth generation ballad singer Sheila Kay Adams, tells stories and sings songs as her grandmother taught her, out in the open, singing to the fireflies and crickets. Her ballads, that tell of Knights and Ladies and boats at sea, hail from the 'Old Country': England, Ireland and Scotland. Passed down through singing generations in the little settlement of Sodom where she grew up, she preserves the haunting and often macabre song of her ancestors, and is today passing it on to her children and grandchildren.

89 year-old Benton Flippen and his Smokey Valley boys, are remnants of a past age and of the heyday of Old Time stringband music, having learnt their tunes at the knee of their parents and grandparents. It won't be long before the last of this generation has passed, and those guardians of the flame, who knew this music as a vital pre-modern part of everyday life in the rural south are with us no longer.

Produced by Peter Meanwell

Repeat.

World Routes

World Routes in Jordan Episode 1: The Bedouin

Brothers Hisham and Hashim show the Bedouin lifestyle and play hypnotic, beautiful music.

Moshe Morad goes deep into the southern desert to find out what it means to be a Bedouin and learn about their ancient customs.

Moshe Morad goes deep into the southern desert, spending time with two Bedouin brothers, Hisham and Hashim, to find out what it means to be a Bedouin and learn about their ancient customs. He makes rare recordings of their hypnotic and beautiful music.

World Routes

World Routes in Jordan Episode 2: Amman: Ilham Al madfai, Toni Qattan and Shou Al Ayam

Moshe records sessions in Amman with some of Jordan's up-and-coming young groups.

Moshe Morad travels to Jordan. 2/2. Moshe is in the capital, Amman, where he records live sessions with some of Jordan's up-and-coming young groups.

Moshe Morad travels to Jordan.

2/2. Moshe is in the capital, Amman, where he records live sessions with some of Jordan's up-and-coming young groups.

The music reflects Jordan's reputation as a young state surrounded by countries with rich and highly developed musical traditions. Here Jordanians, Iraqis and Palestinians fuse classic Arabic songs with more contemporary sounds and instruments.

World Routes

in Cuba Episode 3: Matanzas, birthplace of rumba and danzon

Lucy Duran is in Matanzas, rumba and danzon's home. With the Buena Vista Social Club story

Lucy Duran concludes her thousand-mile road journey in search of Cuba's musical roots. 3/3: She visits Matanzas, the birthplace of two crucial musical styles, rumba and danzon.

Lucy Duran concludes her 1000-mile road journey in search of Cuba’s musical roots.

Lucy visits Matanzas, the birthplace of two crucial musical styles: rumba and danzon. There she records a session with “Munequitos de Matanzas”, one of Latin America’s biggest cult bands.

She returns to Havana and meets record producer Juan de Marcos Gonzalez who tells her the story of Buena Vista Social Club.

World Routes

World Routes in China Episode 2: The Uyghur people and the muqam

Lucy Duran explores the music of the Uyghur people in China's Xinjian Province.

Lucy Duran explores the music of three of China's 56 different ethnic groups, focusing on muqam, performed by Xinjian Province's Uyghur people.

In the second of two special programmes recorded on location in China, Lucy Duran explores the music of three of the country's 56 different ethnic groups. She visits Xinjiang, China's largest province that makes up one-sixth of the country's land-mass. On the ancient Silk Route, it is also home to the Muslim Uyghur people who perform muqam, a type of music that can be found all over the region from Azerbaijan in the west to China in the east.

World Routes

World Routes in Cape Verde Episode 2: Cesaria Evora, Bau and Tito Paris

Lucy Duran visits Cape Verde's musical centre in Mindelo on the island of Sao Vicente.

Lucy Duran visits the islands of Cape Verde and listens to songs for making grogue, the national drink. She also visits the musical centre of Mindelo on Sao Vicente.

Lucy Duran visits Cape Verde, the windswept and dramatic archipelago off the west coast of Africa, and travels to one of the most beautiful islands, San Antao. She hears songs for making grogue, Cape Verde's national drink, which is said to make bulls weep as they operate an ancient sugar press. The programme ends in the unofficial musical capital, Mindelo, on the island of Sao Vicente, where Cesaria Evora was born and where many other Cape Verdean greats began their careers. Including sessions by two such musicians - virtuosic guitarist Bau and singer-songwriter Tito Paris.

Presented by Lucy Duran

Produced by James Parkin

Tel. 020 7765 4661

Fax. 020 7765 5052

e-mail world.routes@bbc.co.uk

World Routes

World Routes in Cape Verde Episode 1: Morna, batuque and Eugenio Tavares

Lucy Duran presents Cape Verdean music exploring slavery, emigration and longing for home.

Lucy Duran visits Cape Verde and presents specially-made recordings of music exploring slavery, emigration and longing for home, including the morna style of Cesaria Evora.

Lucy Duran visits Cape Verde, the windswept and dramatic archipelago off the west coast of Africa. She explores the arrival of slaves in the 15th century and the subsequent departure of generations of Cape Verdeans searching for a better life in America and Europe. With rare and specially-made music recordings, including the morna style made famous by Cesaria Evora, which longs for life back on the islands.

Presented by Lucy Duran

Produced by James Parkin

Tel. 020 7765 4661

Fax. 020 7765 5052

e-mail world.routes@bbc.co.uk

World Routes

An Appalachian Road Trip Episode 3: Music from Georgia

Banning Eyre presents traditional music recorded on location in the state of Georgia, USA.

Banning Eyre visits the state of Georgia to record some of the unique vocal music that has been preserved there and meet the personalities who have kept the traditions alive.

Musician and writer Banning Eyre heads to the American state of Georgia, gateway to the Deep South, and southern end of the Appalachian Mountains, to record some of the unique vocal music that has been preserved in the area, and meet the personalities who have kept the traditions alive.

He meets 92 year old blind gospel legend Sister Fleeta Mitchell, who still sings and plays the piano alongside her musical companion the Revd Willie Mae Eberhardt, herself in her late 70s. Together they recall disturbing tales of life in the south, and the songs that gave people hope.

Banning drops in to the converted chicken shack that is home to Phil Tanner and the Skillet Lickers, to hear them in their weekly session. Phil is the grandson of chicken farmer Gid Tanner who in 1924, with the original Skillet Lickers, became the first southern rural artist to record for the Columbia record label, and whose blend of music and comedy sold millions.

The Myers Family and Friends, a singing family of guitar playing ladies, recall the songs they sang as children for corn shuckings and bean stringings, and local artist and folk song collector Art Rosenbaum talks about the unique character of North Georgia, and picks a tune on one of his many banjos.

As well as the banjos and the ballads, Banning also attends the 141st Annual Alpharetta June Singing, and discovers that the 19th Century tradition of congregational 'shape note' singing still lives on in the south.

World Routes

World Routes in Georgia Episode 2: Svaneti polyphony and Guria yodeling

Music includes rare location recordings of the wild songs of Svaneti.

Lucy Duran continues her musical journey through Georgia. She travels to the highest and remotest part of Europe, Svaneti, to make rare location recordings of its wild songs.

Lucy Duran continues her musical journey through Georgia.

She travels to the highest and remotest part of Europe, Svaneti. An area of extraordinary natural beauty, it's also infamous for its banditry and war-lording, as well as being home to some of the world's oldest music. With the help of the Georgian military, the programme makes rare location recordings of these wild songs.

Presented by Lucy Duran

Produced by James Parkin

Tel. 020 7765 4661

Fax. 020 7765 4378

e-mail world.routes@bbc.co.uk

World Routes

World Routes in Georgia Episode 1: Polyphonic drinking songs and choral music

Lucy Duran travels to Georgia, to discover more about its ancient musical traditions.

Lucy Duran travels to Georgia, to find out how its ancient musical traditions have fared after decades of occupation and instability.

Since gaining independence in 1991, Georgia has been a land of political disorder, culminating in the peaceful Rose Revolution of 2003. Lucy Duran travels to this little-visited country to find out how its ancient musical traditions have fared after decades of occupation and instability.

Music recorded on location for the programme includes lively polyphonic drinking songs and the beautiful choral music of the Georgian Church.

Lucy interviews Rob Parsons, the BBC's former Moscow correspondent, about Georgia and its polyphonic music. At an outdoors dinner party at Rob Parsons country house in Kakheti, Lucy listens to the magical polyphonic acappella singing of the eight singers of Tsinandali performing traditional Georgian songs, while enjoying exquisite traditional food and wine. She also admires the beautiful scenery of the valley and the Caucasian mountains, the highest in Europe (yes, higher than the Alps…).

World Routes

Jerusalem and Nazareth Episode 2: Jerusalem International Oud Festival 2008 - Part 1

Moshe Morad presents music from Syria and ancient Jewish songs from Persia.

Moshe Morad presents exclusive recordings made for the programme at the 2008 Jerusalem International Oud Festival, with music from Syria and ancient Jewish songs from Persia.

Moshe Morad presents music recorded specially for the programme at the 2008 Jerusalem International Oud Festival. He introduces the ancient songs of two exiled communities - the Paytanim of ancient Aleppo and the Persian Jews of Iran.

World Routes

World Routes in Peru Episode 3: Iquitos, Huancayo and Lake Titicaca

Huancayo is famed for its saxophone orchestras, and Lake Titicaca reveals real panpipes.

3/3. Lucy Duran presents a series recorded on location in Peru. The programme features musicians from the banks of the Amazon to the remote Andean town of Huancayo.

Lucy Duran presents a series recorded on location in Peru.

3/3. She records musicians on the banks of the Amazon in Iquitos and travels to the remote Andean town of Huancayo, famed for its massed saxophone orchestras. Also featured is the real sound of Peruvian panpipes with a group from Lake Titicaca.

Jose Paima (kena); Valentin Paima (maracas); Luis Miguel Paima (snare drum); Elviz da Silva (bass drum)

Javier Isuiza (voice); Javier Isuiza Jr. (guitar); Pedro Isuiza (cajon)

Picaflor de los Andes: Un Pasajero en tu Camino

album: The Real Music of Peru

Globestyle Records CDORBD 064

http://www.acerecords.co.uk/

All music except Picaflor de los Andes was recorded on location in Peru by James Birtwistle for BBC Radio 3, August & September 2006

Twenty Minutes

The Planets

Music journalist Paul Morley describes finally seeing the future in Holst's The Planets.

Music journalist and cultural commentator Paul Morley describes finally seeing the future in Holst's enduringly popular work The Planets.

Music journalist and cultural commentator Paul Morley on finally seeing the future in Gustav Holst's 'The Planets'.

'The Planets' was the first classical album that Paul Morley ever bought. As a teenager into experimental German electronic music and psychedelic rock, he expected it to take him into the realms of science fiction. But has was disappointed. It seemed irrelevant, old-fashioned, nothing to do with the future. Decades on, however, 'The Planets' has become for Morley the music of the future, for the future, and it's pop and rock that sound dated and quaint in comparison.

Written and read by Paul Morley

Produced by Justine Willett.

Credits

Composer
Gustav Holst

World Routes

World Routes in Madagascar Episode 3: Valiha and the music of the Spirit House

Lucy Duran presents Madagascan songs accompanying exhumation and reburial ceremonies.

Lucy Duran travels to the island of Madagascar and presents songs accompanying exhumation and reburial ceremonies, the ancestral zither, and also visits a Spirit House.

Lucy Duran continues her journey through Madagascar recording the ancient music of this mysterious island. This week she hears songs that accompany the important exhumation and reburial ceremonies and visits the village of her guide, Justin Vali. Whilst there she hears the delicate sound of the ancestral zither, visits a Spirit House, finds out why you can't whistle after 6pm.

In September 2009, World Routes travelled to Madagascar, the giant Indian Ocean island off the coast of Mozambique - East of the African continent. This mysterious island is full of extraordinary animal and plant life - home to more unique species than just about anywhere on the planet. It's in the grip of political turmoil and its people are some of the poorest in the world. But for us, what makes this island of strange dreams, ancestral worship and sorcery so special is its music. And, like the natural life, its unique evolution - neither African nor Asian - makes it a wonderful melting pot of instruments and styles. Throughout 2010, we'll be broadcasting the recordings we made for World Routes.

Two weeks ago on the programme, Lucy was introduced to the music of Madagascar by Justin Vali and his Malagasy Orkestra. This week she continues a journey of her own to discover some of that music in its true context. She's joined by Justin and a great friend of his; someone he calls his brother. An instrument-maker, musician, producer and - it's fair to say - a Malagasy music fanatic: Paddy Bush (who also happens to be Kate's brother).

Lucy learns about the ceremony of reburial - the bones of ancestors are removed from their tombs every 7 years and danced around, re-dressed and introduced to new members of the family. This joyous occasion is accompanied by uplifting music for flute. Lucy and the World Routes team then travel deep into the high interior. They visit a zebu (the holy cattle of Madagascar) market and record music in the remote and magical village that Justin was born in.

Presented by Lucy Duran

Produced by James Parkin

World Routes

World Routes in Madagascar Episode 2: Hira Gasy and Court Music

Lucy Duran presents music from the 18th-century Malagasy royal court in Madagascar.

Lucy Duran visits the island of Madagascar and presents music from the 18th-century Malagasy royal court and the rarely recorded dramatic story-telling tradition of Hira Gasy.

Lucy Duran visits the Indian Ocean island of Madagascar to discover its remarkable music. She is joined by guides Justin Vali and Paddy Bush and hears the ancient music of Madagascar's royal court as well as the extraordinary and rarely-recorded Hira Gasy. Hundreds of villagers gather to hear a variety performance which spreads news, entertains and teaches people a lesson.

Presented by Lucy Duran

Produced by James Parkin

Navid Akhtar examines the legacy of the influential Qawwali singer Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan.

Navid Akhtar examines the musical legacy of the hugely influential Qawwali star Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan, on the tenth anniversary of the singer's death.

Genre

World Routes

Argentina Episode 2: The Humahuaca Valley

Banning Eyre travels to northwest Argentina to hear the music of the Humahuaca valley.

Musician and writer Banning Eyre travels to northwest Argentina, to hear the songs and carnival music of the Quebrada de Humahuaca, with local musician Tomas Lipan as his guide.

Banning Eyre heads into northwest Argentina, travelling through the provinces of Salta and Jujuy to hear the songs and carnival music of the Quebrada de Humahuaca, a mountain valley in the foothills of the Andes.

Away from the Europe-centric metropolis of Buenos Aires, the northwest of Argentina is characterised by a history of invasion, where indigenous groups such as the Aymara and Coya were conquered first by Incas from the Altiplano, then by the earliest Spanish conquistadors in the 15th Century. The music of the Humahuaca valley is a mix of pan-pipes and end-blown flutes, frame drums and cow horns, mixed with guitars, accordions and mandolins; songs are sung in Spanish as well as Quechua, and the Virgin Mary is venerated alongside Pachamama.

In the fertile Humahuaca valley Banning meets local musician Tomas Lipan, who tells stories of his childhood embarrassment at eating local foods and playing indigenous instruments, rather than eating spaghetti and playing guitar, and the cultural pressure he felt not to express his indigenous heritage. He sings with immense love of his hometown Purmamarca.

Fortunato Ramos, poet, teacher, restaurant owner plays carnival music with his band in the town of Humahuaca, as well as the spectacularly long horn, the erquencho.

Michaela Chauque is a young quena (end blown flute) player, who draws heavily on the ancestral music, and performs a song about the Pucara de Tilcara, a pre-Incan fortress, as well as singing Coplas from the Tilcara Carnival.

Banning also discovers a mechanical Saint that delivers clockwork benedictions.

World Routes

Argentina Episode 3: Chamame

Banning Eyre visits Misiones province in Argentina to learn about chamame music.

Banning Eyre visits Misiones province in North East Argentina with accordionist Chango Spasiuk to learn about chamame, a unique accordion driven mode of music.

Banning Eyre heads into North East Argentina with Chamame accordionist Chango Spasiuk, to see the red earth and hear this unique accordion driven music.

Misiones province in North East Argentina is a sliver of land between Brazil and Paraguay, more tropical than the rest of Argentina, it is part of the ancestral home of the Guarani people. Home to a large number of Jesuit missions in the 17th Century, during the early part of the 20th Century Misiones received an influx of European immigrants to work on the land, especially from Poland and the Ukraine. These East European farmers brought with them the accordion, which added Schottische and Polkas to an already rich cultural mix and the Chamame was born.

Banning Eyre takes internationally renowned chamame accordionist Chango Spasiuk back to his roots in Misiones, to hear about how he learnt the accordion, and to meet and record local musicians. Sergio Tarnovsky is a young local talent from Apostoles who plays the 21 button diatonic accordion known as the verdulera. Lalo Doreto hails from the town of Obera, and is a local radio host, singer, and guitarist, and he puts on a special afternoon session with some friends in his back yard.

As well as being the home of Chamame, Misiones is also the home of "yerba mate", the bitter green tea drunk with a metal straw from a hollowed out gourd by almost everyone in Argentina. Chango shows Banning the right, and the wrong way to make and drink it.

On the way back from the North East they stop in at the Anconetani accordion factory in Buenos Aires, the first Argentine handmade accordion company, to meet its octogenarian patron Nazereno Anconetani, for a tour of the workshops and a session with one of Chamame's elder statesmen, accordionist Tilo Escobar.

Presenter: Banning Eyre

Producer: Peter Meanwell.

Genre

Andy Kershaw and Lucy Duran explore music of ocean communities around the world.

Andy Kershaw and Lucy Duran explore music of ocean communities, sampling sounds in Galicia in Spain, Papua New Guinea, Salvador da Bahia in Brazil and the Solomon Islands.

For this major series to accompany BBC One's 'Human Planet', Andy Kershaw and Lucy Duran go trekking across the globe to bring us music from the peoples of some of the world's remotest regions, visiting many of the places featured in the TV series. This week the focus is on the music of ocean communities.

Galicia: Galicians consider themselves Celts, linked by sea travel with peoples in Northern France, Ireland and Scotland. Lucy Duran meets leading piper Xosé Manuel Budiño, and is invited to the village of Cebreiro for a party celebrating Celtic culture.

Papua New Guinea: To the accompaniment of the villagers, Andy Kershaw sets off on a shark fishing expedition with Blais, the singing shark caller from Tembin Village. Together the try to lure sharks with Blais's unique repertory of shark-calling songs.

Brazil: Lucy Duran visits the coastal city of Salvador da Bahia, the ancient capital of the Camdomblé religion. This is the religion that uses old African customs and languages - it's practised on the seashore looking across to Africa, and the sea and its shells are crucial to the liturgy, and its music too.

Solomon Islands: Andy Kershaw gets the gospel: the Deep Sea Canoe Movement is dedicated to keeping up continuous worship 24 hours a day on the paradise island of Malaita.

Producers: Roger Short and James Parkin.

Genre

Brand

Music Planet

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