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Nature

Series 1 Episode 2: A Hundred Years of British Birds

A programme marking the centenary of the influential journal British Birds.

4 Extra Debut. A programme marking the centenary of the influential journal British Birds. Presented by Brett Westwood. From May 2007.

A Hundred Years of British Birds

Arguably the most influential journal of its genre, British Birds reaches its 100th birthday in June. With the help of leading ornithologists, Brett Westwood looks back at a history which mirrors the growth of birdwatching in the UK. He uncovers the scandal of the Hastings Rarities, the first arrival of the Collared Dove, and the unique legacy of observations in the magazine.

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Nature: Series 1

Leading Edge

Climate Change and Himalayan Stargazing

Geoff Watts reports on new research on climate change.

Geoff Watts reports on new research that suggests that the world’s current climates may disappear if global warming trends continue, while weather unlike any seen today would be created.

A Whole New Climate

When we talk of global warming, we tend to think of things as they are now, but a bit hotter. However, new research suggests that the world’s current climates may disappear if global warming trends continue, while weather unlike any seen today would be created. Professor Jack Williams of the University of Wisconsin explains.

A Mammal Family Tree

Kate Jones of the Zoological Society of London describes a new super-tree of mammalian evolution. This family tree throws doubt on the theory that the demise of the dinosaurs paved the way for the rise of mammals, suggesting that they evolved some 15 million years later.

Himalayan Stargazing

The Hanle Observatory is the world’s highest altitude telescope, four and a half thousand metres above sea level, in the Himalayan desert. Geoff reports from the observatory's control centre, miles away in Bangalore.

New Ideas for New Stars

Professor Gerry Gilmore of the Institute of Astronomy in Cambridge ponders the frustratingly slow development of our grasp of galactic evolution, while new galaxies are being discovered all the time.

A History of Plate Tectonics

Professor Minik Rosing from the University of Copenhagen explains why he and his colleagues think they can answer the question of when the movement of plate tectonics, which has shaped our continents, began. It's a question which has been fascinating geologists for years.

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Leading Edge

Could a strange dog from remote New Guinea have been man's first best friend?

Could a strange melodious dog from the remote cloud forests of New Guinea have been man's first best friend? Andrew Luck-Baker investigates.

The Rook and Me

Episode 4: Autumn - Roosting Again

The summer's scattering of rooks is over and their communal urges bring them together.

Mark Cocker follows a colony of rooks over the course of a year. The summer's scattering of rooks is over and their communal urges bring them together.

The Making of Modern Medicine

Episode 12: Making Signs

Systematic post mortems revolutionised the study of disease.

Systematic post mortems revolutionised the study of disease. It enabled physicians armed with new instruments such as the stethoscope to detect the signs of disease.

Series exploring over 2,000 years of western medicine, written and presented by medical historian Andrew Cunningham.

Systematic post mortems revolutionised the study of disease. It enabled physicians armed with new instruments such as the stethoscope to translate the signs they were reading on the outside of the body into what was going on inside.

Andrew explores how doctors in the Paris hospitals could now link the symptoms of many different patients with particular diseases. But what did this mean for the patient who up until the 1800s had always expected to be seen as special and unique?

The readers are David Rintoul, Peter Capaldi, Jason Watkins and Scott Handy.

The Making of Modern Medicine

Episode 13: A Long and Ghastly Kitchen

Napoleonic France witnessed Dr Magendie's experiments on live animals.

Napoleonic France witnessed the second big event that made medicine scientific - Dr Magendie's experiments on live animals.

A major narrative history series exploring over 2,000 years of western medicine, written and presented by medical historian Andrew Cunningham.

Napoleonic France witnessed the second big event that made medicine scientific - Dr Magendie's experiments on live animals, which were conducted to find out how the animal and human body works.

English observers found this new field of experimental physiology mere self-indulgent cruelty in the pursuit of knowledge, despite Magendie laying out his position at length. But what did this first generation of researchers discover which was considered to have an important impact on medicine?

The readers are Peter Capaldi, David Rintoul, Scott Handy and Jason Watkins.

The Making of Modern Medicine

Episode 17: Dark side of obstetrics

Andrew discusses the work of Ignaz Semmelweis in Vienna.

Andrew discusses the work of Ignaz Semmelweis in Vienna, who made proposals for better cleanliness in maternity hospitals to cut down on the spread of diseases.

Leading Edge

Predicting Hurricane Intensity, Robots with Emotions and the UK’s First Cold Temperature Facility

Geoff Watts visits the UK's first low temperature experimental facility in Bristol.

Eye of the Storm

Flying an aircraft into the eye of a hurricane may sound like madness, but researchers did just that during hurricanes Rita and Katrina in 2005. Geoff hears how the information gleaned is helping scientists to predict the intensity of future hurricanes, something that has proved very difficult in the past.

I-Robot

Robots with emotions? A far-fetched plot from a Will Smith movie or a future reality? Geoff visits the University of Hertfordshire to find out.

Champagne Supernova

Author of "The Never-Ending Days of Being Dead", Marcus Chown celebrates the 20th anniversary of the first naked-eye spotting of a supernova in nearly 400 years.

It’s Freezing in Bristol

Geoff visits the UK’s first cold temperature facility at the University of Bristol, where researchers are recreating the environment of polar regions to better understand them.

Secrets of the Stradivari

Scientists in Texas are uncovering the secrets of the great violin makers like Stradivari by analysing the wood used to make them. Jon Stewart reports.

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Leading Edge

Planet Earth

Episode 10: Seasonal Forests

David Attenborough reveals the greatest woodlands on earth.

Documentary series which celebrates our planet in all its glory. David Attenborough reveals the greatest woodlands on earth, from the northern Taiga to Madagascar.

David Attenborough's documentary series which celebrates our planet in all its eclectic wonder. He reveals the greatest woodlands on earth, from the evergreen forests of the frozen north to the deciduous dry forests of the equator.

The Taiga forest is a silent world of stunted conifers cloaked in snow and ice. The trees form a belt that circles the globe, broken only by ocean, and contains a third of all trees on earth. Here, animals are scarce, with just a few charismatic loners like the wolverine and lynx.

By contrast, the broadleaf forests of North America and Europe bustle with life. The most startling illustration happens just once every 17 years, when the nymphs of the periodical cicada burst from the soil in the biggest insect emergence on the planet.

In California, witness the cameras fly up the tallest trees on earth: giant redwoods over 100 metres high. See General Sherman, a giant sequoia, ten times the size of a blue whale, and the largest living thing on the planet. Close by are bristlecone pines, so old they pre-date the pyramids and were already 2,500 years old when Jesus Christ was born.

The baobab forests of Madagascar are the strangest of all. The bizarre upside down trees store water in their swollen trunks and harbour strange wildlife, such as the tiny mouse lemur, the world's smallest primate.

Series

Planet Earth

Costing the Earth

The Environmental Impact of Professional Football

Tom Heap explores the impact of professional football on the environment.

Tom Heap explores the impact of professional football on the environment. With travel and litter as well as lighting and water demands, just one match can have a huge impact.

Tom Heap explores the impact of professional football on the environment. With travel and litter as well as lighting and water demands, just one match can have a huge impact.

Goalkeeper David James has seen how other countries have taken measures to improve sustainability, and believes that more clubs in the UK could play their part. Tom assesses measures currently in place and visits the team claiming to have the UK's first sustainable stadium.

[Rptd Fri 3.00pm].

The Making of Modern Medicine

Episode 22: Transforming Plague

When bubonic plague broke out in Hong Kong in 1894, European rivalry continued.

When bubonic plague broke out in Hong Kong in 1894, European rivalry between France and Germany continued to be played out between two students of Louis Pasteur and Robert Koch.

Thinking Allowed

Lost in Runescape – Social Worth in Early Modern England

Laurie Taylor explores the social values of the virtual world Runescape.

Laurie Taylor explores the social values of the virtual world Runescape with Dr Simon Bradford before discussing the perceived worth of people in 15th century with Dr Alex Shepard.

LOST IN RUNESCAPE

Laurie Taylor explores the practices in the virtual spaces of online gaming communities with Nic Crowe, and Dr Simon Bradford. They discuss their recent academic paper on the online game-world called Runescape, which explores how young people construct and maintain identities within virtual social systems. They explain how values of the real world are replicated in Runescape.

SOCIAL WORTH IN EARLY MODERN ENGLAND

In the fifteen and sixteenth centuries seven million people appeared as witnesses in church courts, and were asked a series of questions. One of which was; how much are you worth? Exploring the answers from gentlemen to servants, Economic historian Dr Alex Shepard, describes how his extensive research into this question uncovered a surprisingly material culture, where the value of your word was exactly analogous to the weight of your purse.

The Making of Modern Medicine

Episode 24: Flinging the tropics open to civilisation

What role did European medicine play in spreading European culture across the Empire?

In the 1870s, the so-called 'scramble for Africa' saw many countries competing for a slice of the continent. What role did European medicine play in spreading European culture?

The Making of Modern Medicine

Episode 25: Near Pavilions

The influence of Florence Nightingale and the sanitarians.

The influence of Florence Nightingale and the sanitarians in creating isolated pavilion-style buildings designed on the basis of a current theory of disease.

The Making of Modern Medicine

Episode 28: Free at the Point of Need

The National Health Service was set up in 1948 to provide free healthcare for everyone.

It was called it the biggest experiment in social service that the world has ever seen. The National Health Service was set up in 1948 to provide free healthcare for everyone.

Jonathan Edwards looks at the concept of beauty.

Jonathan Edwards presents a series exploring how science both shapes and explains our world. This programme looks at the concept of beauty.

Material World

El Niño - Leonard Euler

Quentin Cooper looks into the life and work of mathematician Leonhard Euler.

Quentin Cooper looks into the life and work of the relatively unknown but extraordinarily prolific mathematician Leonhard Euler, who was born 300 years ago this year.

El Niño

The El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is a huge, unpredictable climate system that alternately brings drought and flood to the Pacific and Indian Oceans. The most recent El Niño event is currently petering out and now Australia, having suffered its longest drought period on record, is cautiously optimistic that rain will soon start to fall as La Niña, the other extreme of the oscillation, is likely to develop. Press reports have suggested that this last El Niño event might lead to 2007 being globally the hottest year on record.

But has the earth been here before? Oceanographers have been investigating the possibility that 2-4 million years ago, when there were more greenhouse gases and the earth was warmer than now, the region was afflicted by a permanent El Niño. Quentin is joined By Alan Haywood, palaeoceanographer at Leeds University, and John Hammond of the BBC Weather Centre to discuss the lessons for our future.

Leonard Euler

Leonard Euler (15 April 1707 – 7 September 1783) was the most prolific mathematician who ever lived. His output was vast, and there are precious few areas of mathematics that were not touched by his genius. From practical problems of his day, such as the design of sailing masts and municipal lotteries to the highest reaches of pure maths and number theory, his own work accounted for approximately one third of all the maths published in the 19th century.

Joining Quentin this week is maths historian Robin Wilson, professor of pure maths at the Open University and Gresham Professor of Geometry in London, and Dr Julian Havil, maths teacher at Winchester College in Hampshire.

The Making of Modern Medicine

Episode 30: Transplant

In 1967, Christiaan Barnard performed the first heart transplant operation.

In 1967, Christiaan Barnard performed the first heart transplant operation. Competition between pioneering teams of transplant surgeons pushed the limits in scientific medicine.

Nature

The Answer's in the Soil

Paul Evans discovers the importance of soil to the quality of our future environment.

The Answer's in the Soil: Paul Evans delves into the fascinating world of the soil and discovers its importance to the quality of our future environment.

The Answer's in the Soil

Paul Evans delves into the fascinating world of the soil and discovers its importance to the quality of our future environment. There are an estimated 15 million species of soil organism, all interacting to form complex communities which affect the plants that grow in them and every living thing that depends in turn upon these plants.

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Thinking Allowed

Work Place Violence - War Reporting

Laurie Taylor explores violence in the work place and examines how we perceive war.

Laurie Taylor explores the impacts of violence in the work place with Prof. PJ Waddington and examines the perceptions and realities of war with Frank Webster and Christina Lamb.

WORK PLACE VIOLENCE

Is workplace violence an escalating problem?  Some statistics make grim reading especially over the last seven to eight years? But according to the British Crime Survey, it is still quite low, just 1.7% of the working population will be a victim of workplace violence.  Peter (Tank) Waddington, Professor of Social Policy, at the University of Wolverhampton has just published new research using forensic or police interviewing techniques and talks about its findings.

WAR REPORTING

In a few days, Frank Webster, Department of Sociology, City University, London will present a paper entitled Campaigning in a changing Information Environment The Anti-War and Peace Movement in Britain and New Media at the BSA 2007 Conference. Laurie Taylor is joined by Frank Webster, who argues that there is an unprecedented battle underway over the perceptions and realities of war, and award wining foreign correspondent Christina Lamb to discuss whether a state’s attempts to control information are being defeated by a ‘new information environment’.

Results 1 to 20 of more than 10,000

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