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Le Malade imaginaire?

France is unhappy with itself. Quentin Peel asks if the country requires radical reform.

France is unhappy with itself. Quentin Peel asks if the country has deep-seated problems that require radical reform or is just suffering from hypochondria.

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Analysis

Sue MacGregor and guests revisit 1974 through previously classified government documents.

1974 was a year of the Three Day week, a Miners Strike and two General Elections. Sue MacGregor explores the papers released under the 30-year rule for more insight.

1974 was a year of political confusion and domestic strife. There was the Three Day week, a Miners Strike and two General Elections as well as on-going problems over Northern Ireland and Cyprus, and an attempt to kidnap Princess Anne.

With exclusive access to papers released by The National Archives under the thirty year rule, Sue MacGregor presents UK CONFIDENTIAL, a special Radio 4 programme which will give a new insight on many of the political decisions and controversies of the time.

The programme also features interviews with Tony Benn (the then Secretary of State for Industry), Sir Edward Heath, Lord Walker (the then Secretary of State for Trade and Industry), Merlyn Rees (the then Secretary of State for Northern Ireland), Lord Fitt, Patrick Jenkin (the then Chief Secretary to the Treasury) and other politicians and civil servants of the day who will talk candidly about the events of that year for the first time.

Also taking part are Lord Howard, Joe Haines, Ian Aitken and Lord Armstrong.

Producer: David Prest and Louise Adamson

A Whistledown Production, in association with Takeaway Media.

Credits

Presenter
Sue MacGregor
Interviewed Guest
Joe Haines
Interviewed Guest
Tony Benn
Interviewed Guest
Peter Walker
Interviewed Guest
Anthony Howard
Interviewed Guest
Robert Armstrong
Interviewed Guest
Ian Aitken

Analysis

1707: Bravehearts and Bankers

Is there a link between the end of Empire and the resurgence of Scottish nationalism?

Is there a link between the end of Empire and the resurgence of Scottish nationalism? Dr Richard Weight examines patriotism and economics.

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Analysis

Analysis

Miserable Children

A UNICEF report alleged that the UK is failing its children. Andrew Brown investigates.

A recent UNICEF report prompted accusations that the UK is failing its children. Andrew Brown investigates.

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Analysis

Analysis

The Beginner's Guide to Separation

Could tensions between Holyrood and Westminster could mean an end to the Union?

The Beginner's Guide to Separation: Tensions between Holyrood and Westminster have increased since the Scottish elections. Could this mean an end to the Union? Chris Bowlby reports.

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Analysis

Analysis

Changing Charity

Alison Wolf investigates the role of charities in delivering public services.

Changing Charity: Political leaders are promising a much greater role for charities in delivering public services. But what difference can they make? Alison Wolf investigates.

Genre

Brand

Analysis

House of Commons

Commons Business Statement

A statement from Jacob Rees-Mogg on forthcoming business in the Commons, from 4 June.

A statement from leader of the House Jacob Rees-Mogg on forthcoming business in the Commons, from Thursday 4 June.

Gordon Brewer and guests look at the week’s events at Westminster and Holyrood.

Emma Barnett Gets Answers

Trials that shocked Britain, with Sir Richard Henriques

The former judge talks about being involved in the James Bulger and Harold Shipman trials.

Former High Court judge Sir Richard Henriques talks about his involvement in the Jamie Bulger trial and the prosecution of Harold Shipman.

Emma speaks to the former High Court judge Sir Richard Henriques.

As an eminent QC, Sir Richard worked on infamous cases including the Jamie Bulger trial and the prosecution of Harold Shipman.

As a judge, he presided over the cases of the Morecambe Bay cockling disaster, the transatlantic aircraft plot and the killing of Jean Charles de Menezes.

Emma speaks to Sir Richard about what being involved in the the trials was like, whether he was personally affected, and if people convicted of heinous crimes can ever truly change.

His book, From Crime to Crime: Harold Shipman to Operation Midland: 17 Cases That Shocked the World, is out now.

Red Lines

O'Leary, Newton, John

Mark and guests discuss Brexit, Barnier & a return of Crazy Prices.

Brand

Red Lines

House of Commons

Urgent Question on the Coronavirus Lockdown

Urgent question tabled by shadow health secretary Jon Ashworth.

The urgent question in the House of Commons tabled by shadow health secretary Jon Ashworth on the coronavirus 'R' value and lockdown measures, from Monday 8 June.

World Questions

Addis Ababa

A debate about the future of Ethiopia, recorded in front of a public audience

A debate about the future of Ethiopia, recorded in front of a public audience.

World Questions comes to Ethiopia at a crucial time in the country’s history.

Ethiopia’s prime minister, Abiy Ahmed, has initiated a series of unprecedented reforms in his first year in office. He's made peace with Eritrea, freed 60,000 political prisoners, unbanned opposition groups and appointed women to half his cabinet. He's pledged free elections in 2020 and now faces one of his biggest challenges - moving the economy from state-led to market-based growth while overseeing far-reaching political reforms. If he succeeds, Ethiopia could cement its position as one of Africa’s biggest players.

The BBC’s Jonathan Dimbleby is joined by a panel of leading Ethiopian politicians in a debate led by questions from the audience.

The panel:

Mustafa Omer: President of the Somali region

Merera Gudina: Leader of the Oromo People's Congress

Tsedale Lemma: Editor of The Addis Standard

Eskinder Nega: journalist, campaigner and former political prisoner

Producer: Helen Towner

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

(Photo: Addis Ababa, Ethiopia: Lion of Judah, Credit: M.Torres /Getty Images)

Any Questions?

Tim Farron MP, Kate Forbes MSP, David Lammy MP, Nadhim Zahawi MP

Chris Mason presents political debate from Broadcasting House, London.

Chris Mason presents political debate from Broadcasting House with Tim Farron MP, Kate Forbes MSP, David Lammy MP and Nadhim Zahawi MP.

Chris Mason presents political debate from Broadcasting House in London with former Liberal Democrat leader Tim Farron, the Scottish Finance Secretary Kate Forbes, the Shadow Justice Secretary David Lammy and the Business and Industry Minister Nadhim Zahawi.

Producer: Maire Devine.

News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament

Jonathan Freedland reassesses Machiavelli and finds the inspiration for modern republics.

Machiavelli is identified with cunning and evil, but 500 years after he wrote The Prince, this reassessment by Jonathan Freedland shows how Machiavelli inspired modern republics.

Five hundred years ago, Niccolo Machiavelli, a former senior official in renaissance Florence, who had been sacked when the Medici returned to power, was drafting a study on the realities of politics. When his ground-breaking work was later published after his death, it was given the title, 'The Prince'. The book's frank account of princely power soon made its author's name synonymous with cunning and evil: Shakespeare's "murderous Machiavel" is the best known of many pejorative literary references.

But in this programme Jonathan Freedland re-assesses Machiavelli and finds that his malign reputation has overshadowed his much greater achievement as a champion of republican government. When Machiavelli commented in 'The Prince' that he would 'leave out all discussion of republics, inasmuch as in another place I have written of them at length', he was referring to 'The Discourses', his major study of ancient Rome. In 'The Discourses', written between 1513 and 1519, Machiavelli re-asserts the republican ideals of ancient Rome and transmits them to the modern world.

Machiavelli's impact has been felt far beyond renaissance Florence. After the execution of the English king, Charles I, in 1649, radical thinkers such as James Harrington and Algernon Sidney adapted Machiavelli's republicanism. In the 1720s, 'Cato's Letters' reflected Machiavelli's republican thinking in their attacks on corruption and patronage, and made an impact in Britain's American colonies. Later, Machiavelli's revival of republicanism influenced Americans in their fight for independence and inspired the 'founding fathers' when they framed the United States constitution.

Producer, Rob Shepherd.

Andrew is joined by Anneliese Dodds MP, Arlene Foster MLA and professor Peter Openshaw.

Andrew Marr is joined by Anneliese Dodds MP, shadow chancellor; Arlene Foster MLA, first minister of Northern Ireland and government scientific adviser professor Peter Openshaw of Imperial College.

Andrew Marr is joined by Anneliese Dodds MP, shadow chancellor; Arlene Foster MLA, first minister of Northern Ireland and government scientific adviser professor Peter Openshaw of Imperial College.

The newpapers are reviewed by Telegraph associate editor Camilla Tominey and BBC health editor Hugh Pym.

Credits

Presenter
Andrew Marr
Interviewed Guest
Anneliese Dodds
Interviewed Guest
Arlene Foster
Interviewed Guest
Peter Openshaw
Participant
Camilla Tominey
Participant
Hugh Pym

Coverage of proceedings in the House of Commons on Thursday 11 June.

Coverage of proceedings in the House of Commons on Thursday 11 June, including the remaining stages of the Birmingham Commonwealth Games Bill.

Your say on the issues discussed on Any Questions? Presented by Anita Anand.

Politics Wales

14/06/2020

All the latest political news from Wales and beyond, presented by James Williams.

Select Committees

Coronavirus and the Arts Committee

Coverage of a session on the impact of the coronavirus pandemic on the arts.

Coverage of the Digital, Culture, Media and Sport select committee session on the impact of the coronavirus pandemic on the arts.

Coverage of the Digital, Culture, Media and Sport select committee session on the impact of the coronavirus pandemic on the arts, with evidence from UKTheatre, the Creative Industries Federation, the Musicians' Union and Culture minister Caroline Dinenage.

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