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Buried Treasure

The Peat Bog Murder Mystery

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42 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:

A programme on the well-preserved body of a 2000-year-old Dane found in a peat bog. (1954)

First transmitted in 1954, Glyn Daniel and Sir Mortimer Wheeler discuss the well-preserved body of Tollund Man, a 2000-year-old Dane found in a peat bog.

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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:

Glyn Daniel talks about recent research into the mystery of Stonehenge. (1954)

First transmitted in 1954, Glyn Daniel talks about recent research into the mystery of Stonehenge.

First transmitted in 1954, Glyn Daniel talks about recent research into the mystery of Stonehenge.

Meanwhile, producer Paul Johnstone undertakes a series of experiments to show how the 60 stones in the Stonehenge Circle could have been conveyed from the Preseli Hills in Pembrokeshire, some 200 miles away.

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26 minutes Available for years First broadcast:

An expert panel try to identify unusual artifacts, but will they guess correctly? (1954)

First transmitted in 1954, Manchester Museum challenges a panel of experts to identify a series of unusual objects.

First transmitted in 1954, Manchester Museum challenges a panel of experts to identify a series of unusual objects.

The programme is chaired by Glyn Daniel, Fellow of St John's College, Cambridge. The experts are Dr G. H. S. Bushnell (Curator of Cambridge University's Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology), Dr F. Rainey (Director of the Philadelphia University Museum) and Sir Mortimer Wheeler (Professor of Archaeology, University of London).

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31 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:

The National Museum of Prague challenges the experts. (1956)

First transmitted in 1956, the National Museum of Prague challenges a panel of experts to identify a series of unusual objects.

First transmitted in 1956, the National Museum of Prague challenges a panel of experts to identify a series of unusual objects.

The programme is chaired by Glyn Daniel, Fellow of St John's College, Cambridge. The experts are V. Gordon Childe (Director of the Institute of Archaeology), Professor Sean P O Riordain (Department of Archaeology, University College Dublin) and Sir Mortimer Wheeler (Professor of Archaeology, University of London).

Buried Treasure

The Walls of Jericho

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31 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:

Film of the archaeological excavations at Jericho. (1956)

First transmitted in 1956, Dr Kathleen Kenyon and Lady Wheeler discuss excavations at Jericho.

First transmitted in 1956, presenter Glyn Daniel talks to archaeologists about excavations at Jericho, which have led to the discovery of the oldest city known to man.

Discussing footage filmed at the site are Dr Kathleen Kenyon, Director of the British School of Archaeology in Jerusalem, who is in charge of the excavations and Sir Mortimer Wheeler who visited the site. Among the archaeologists who have dug there is Lady Wheeler, who is in the studio to discuss dig live at Jericho.

Buried Treasure

Mohenjo-daro

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29 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:

Sir Mortimer Wheeler describes his excavations of Mohenjo-daro, in Pakistan. (1957)

First transmitted in 1957, Sir Mortimer Wheeler describes the results of his excavations of the Indus Valley civilization city of Mohenjo-daro in modern-day Pakistan.

First transmitted in 1957, Sir Mortimer Wheeler describes the results of his excavations of the 4,000 year-old, red brick Indus Valley civilization city of Mohenjo-daro in modern-day Pakistan.

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27 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:

Sir Mortimer Wheeler sails the Mediterranean. (1958)

First transmitted in 1958, Sir Mortimer Wheeler sails from Venice to Greece, to determine why iconic sites continue to fulfil the earnest traveller's sightseeing pleasure.

First transmitted in 1958, Sir Mortimer Wheeler and scholars from the Hellenic Travellers' Club sail from Venice to Mycenae, Greece to determine why iconic historical sites along this route continue to fulfil the earnest traveller's sightseeing pleasure.

St Mark's Church in Venice, Olympia, Agamemnon... all are historical landmark sites across the Mediterranean which continue to entice travellers from near and far to witness their captivating allure.

Armchair Voyage: Hellenic Cruise

Istanbul and the Islands

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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:

Sir Mortimer Wheeler and the Hellenic scholars visit the Aegean Islands of Lesbos. (1958)

First transmitted in 1958, Sir Mortimer Wheeler and the Hellenic scholars sail east via Istanbul, stepping onshore on the Aegean Islands of Lesbos, an ancient trade route site.

First transmitted in 1958, Sir Mortimer Wheeler and the Hellenic Travellers’ Club scholars continue to sail the Mediterranean.

In this programme they travel east via Istanbul, stepping onshore on the Aegean island of Lesbos, a site which during antiquity held a significant position along the ancient trade route to Hellespont. In Turkey, Sir Mortimer Wheeler meets German archaeologist Professor Boehringer, to discuss his excavations at Asclepium in the ancient Greek city of Pergamon.

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28 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:

Sir Mortimer Wheeler and the Hellenic Travellers’ Club crew visit Delos and Athens. (1958)

First transmitted in 1958, Sir Mortimer Wheeler and the Hellenic Travellers’ Club visit Delos and Athens in the last leg of their journey around the Mediterranean.

First transmitted in 1958, Sir Mortimer Wheeler and the Hellenic Travellers’ Club conclude their journey around the Mediterranean.

Sir Mortimer explores the extensive archaeological sites on the Greek island of Delos, before travelling to Epidaurus to admire its beautiful theatre. In Athens, sites explored include the Parthenon and the open-air Theatre of Dionysus.

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32 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:

The Victoria & Albert Museum challenges the experts. (1958)

First transmitted in 1958, the Victoria & Albert Museum challenges a panel of experts to identify a series of unusual objects.

First transmitted in 1958, the Victoria & Albert Museum challenges a panel of experts to identify a series of unusual objects.

The programme is chaired by Glyn Daniel, Fellow of St John's College, Cambridge. The experts are Thomas Bodkin (Professor of Fine Arts at Birmingham University), Hugh Short F.S.A (Curator of Salisbury South Wilts, and Blackmore Museum) and Sir Mortimer Wheeler (Secretary of the British Academy).

Buried Treasure

King Solomon's Mines

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28 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:

Sir Mortimer Wheeler explores the stone ruins of Great Zimbabwe. (1958)

First transmitted in 1958, Sir Mortimer Wheeler explores the stone ruins of Great Zimbabwe, once thought to be the source of King Solomon's gold.

First transmitted in 1958, Sir Mortimer Wheeler explores the stone ruins of Great Zimbabwe National Monument, a mysterious site once thought to be the source of King Solomon's gold.

Sir Mortimer joins Roger Summers, Chairman of the Southern Rhodesia Historical Monuments Commission, on an excavation of the site to find out more about the largest ruins in southern Africa.

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35 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

1959 documentary showing images of a Liverpool still recovering from the post-war gloom.

Denis Mitchell's 1959 documentary is full of evocative images of a Liverpool still recovering from the post-war gloom.

Denis Mitchell's 1959 documentary is full of evocative images of a Liverpool still recovering from the post-war gloom.

This BBC film won the award for the best television documentary film in the Italia Prize Contest, 1959.

Credits

Director
Denis Mitchell
Director
Roy Harris
Title Music
Thomas Henderson

After the Battle

London - Ed Murrow Reports

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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:

American reporter Ed Murrow returns to London where he spent much of World War II. (1959)

First transmitted in 1959, American reporter Ed Murrow returns to London. He recalls some of his most memorable broadcasts from war-torn London and reports on its recovery.

First transmitted in 1959, American reporter Ed Murrow returns to London where, during the war years, he had broadcast vivid descriptions of Britain during her "finest and darkest hours, trying to report the suffering, the sacrifice and the steadiness of her people" to a listening world.This film features dramatic reports of the Battle of Britain and the Blitz, which gave rise to his celebrated closing phrase “Good night and good luck.” Murrow returned to London to examine "what Britain has done with her years of victory." He reports from London’s East End which still bore the scars of the wartime raids, the London docks where dockers claim that taxing them for working on Sundays is "the greatest liberty that's been took by a worker in his life", and asks London's younger generation what kind of world they would like to live in. "This is London..." on the brink of the 1960s, from where Murrow argues that post-war hopes for better health, better education, better housing and full employment are falling short of expectations.

The Grandeur That Was Rome

The Skeleton of an Empire

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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:

Sir Mortimer Wheeler investigates the legacy of the Roman Empire. (1960)

First transmitted in 1960, Sir Mortimer Wheeler embarks on an epic journey from Britain to Africa, to investigate the legacy of the Roman Empire.

First transmitted in 1960, Sir Mortimer Wheeler embarks on an epic journey from Britain to Africa to examine the legacy of one of history’s greatest civilisations - the Roman Empire.

At the height of its reign the Roman Empire held territory spanning from the Atlantic to the Tigris. The empire was a formidable political force that dominated the peoples of three separate continents, offering them a new and distinct culture and a civilization that allowed for freedom of travel.

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20 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:

Sir Mortimer Wheeler looks at the religious beliefs of the Roman Empire. (1960)

First transmitted in 1960, Sir Mortimer Wheeler examines the religious cosmologies which emerged, and died out, under the Roman Empire.

First transmitted in 1960, Sir Mortimer Wheeler examines the religious cosmologies which emerged, and died out, under the Roman Empire.

Paganism was the predominant religious belief system of the Romans. However, when followers became disillusioned by their Pagan deities, Christianity replaced the old religious doctrine and emerged as the new belief system to take hold across the Roman Empire.

The Grandeur That Was Rome

Roman Art and Architecture

BBC
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:

Sir Mortimer Wheeler surveys the art and architecture of the Roman period. (1960)

First transmitted in 1960, Sir Mortimer Wheeler surveys some of the Roman Empire’s most impressive architectural feats and the artworks that characterised the period.

First transmitted in 1960, Sir Mortimer Wheeler concludes his journey to trace the legacy of the Roman Empire by surveying some of the empire’s most impressive architectural feats and the artworks that characterised the period. He marvels at an array of buildings, sculptural monuments, religious paintings and frescos that artists during this period produced.

BBC
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43 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:

Jack Ashley's film showed the suffering caused by high unemployment in Hartlepool. (1963)

Politically passionate and one of the first working class reporters at the BBC, Jack Ashley wanted to show the suffering caused by high unemployment in Hartlepool. (1963)

Politically passionate and one of the first working class reporters at the BBC, Jack Ashley wanted to show the suffering caused by high unemployment in Hartlepool. With no work, no prospects, and little money, Ashley asked how the unemployed reacted to their situation in an increasingly affluent society.

The documentary caused a storm when it was first shown in 1963, bringing Hartlepool’s problems to the attention of a national audience. After the programme aired parcels were sent to the contributors containing food, clothing, presents for the children and even an abundance of Christmas turkeys from people all over the UK. (1963)

Credits

Narrator
Colin Wills
Camera Operator
Robert Painter
Film Editor
Keith Latham
Director
Jack Ashley
Producer
Jack Ashley
BBC
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30 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

How London has grown in size and spread into the surrounding country. (1964)

First transmitted in 1964, architectural critic Reyner Banham's film brings out the unique character of London and explains how London has grown in size over the past 500 years.

First transmitted in 1964, this film charts how London has grown in size and spread into the surrounding country. Written and narrated by architectural critic Reyner Banham, A City Crowned with Green describes the unique character of London as a capital city. Banham looks at how it has, from the time of Elizabeth I, defied the efforts of the planners to curb its growth but he is alarmed by the urban sprawl. Is to too late to get back closer to the heart and make London a city crowned with green?

Chronicle

Vikings in North America

BBC
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50 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Documentary about the Vikings who allegedly discovered North America. (1966)

First transmitted in 1966, Glyn Daniel presents a documentary about the Vikings who colonised Greenland and allegedly discovered North America. Narrated by Magnus Magnusson.

First transmitted in 1966, Glyn Daniel and Magnus Magnusson present a documentary about the Vikings who colonised Greenland and allegedly discovered North America.

At the Royal Library in Copenhagen, Magnus Magnusson studies the Flatey Book, a medieval Icelandic manuscript containing sagas of the Norse kings.

Brand

Chronicle

Chronicle

The Roman Goose March: The Holy Sailors

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50 minutes Available for over a year First broadcast:
Latest broadcast:

Glyn Daniel recruits an Olympian to investigate how far a goose can walk in a day. (1966)

First transmitted in 1966, Glyn Daniel recruits Olympic gold medal winner Ann Packer to find out how long it would have taken to walk geese from France to Rome.

First transmitted in 1966, Glyn Daniel recruits Olympic gold medal winner Ann Packer to investigate how long it would have taken to walk geese from northern Gaul in France to Rome, Italy.

This march, which was described by the classic Roman writer Pliny in his 'Natural History' in the 1st Century AD, also serves as a practical demonstration of how keen the Romans were on their version of foie gras.

Brand

Chronicle

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