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CONCERT

Synopsis

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(Continued)
A STRAIN of melancholy, amounting to morbidity, shows itself in Tchaikovsky. The
Fourth Symphony and the Sixth (' Pathetic ') both contain evidence of it, and so, to a smaller extent, does this Fifth Symphony.
A ' Motto ' Theme of sombre character, which opens the work, is heard in each of the Movements, though, towards the end, in a much brighter, even triumphant mood.
The FIRST MOVEMENT begins with a soft introduction, containing the ' Motto,' and then goes on a spirited course, its Second Main Tune (Strings) providing relief, in its gentler suggestion -almost that of pleading, one might say.
The SECOND MOVEMENT is mostly quiet and plaintive, It has three Main Tunes. heard respectively on Horn. Strings, and Clarinet. The
' Motto ' Theme then intrudes, giving way quickly to a review of the Main Tunes, the Movement. ending peacefully.
The THIRD MOVEMENT is one of Tchaikovsky's many charming Valses, in writing which he could display all his enchanting skill in orchestration. The ' Motto ' casts a momentary gloom on the proceedings, near the end.
In the Introduction to the LAST MOVEMENT the haunting theme has become bold and cheerful, having been put in a major key. Its last appearance is in the final bars of the Symphony, where it dominates the music regally.

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This site contains the BBC listings information which the BBC printed in Radio Times between 1923 and 2009. You can search the site for BBC programmes, people, dates and Radio Times editions.

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Feedback about CONCERT, 5GB Daventry (Experimental), 20.45, 22 March 1928
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