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2LS Leeds

"THE BATTLE OF BRIGGATE."

Written by Max Kester.
Produced by L. B. RAMSDEN.
Music by ALEC H. ASHWORTH.
An Episode in the History of Leeds, and in the lives of its ordinary folk, with songs based on Yorkshire tunes.
Characters:
Mind Picture : Many small incidents-small when viewed from the distance of three hundred years, but- large indeed to those, who lived in Leeds in those days-have helped to give colour to the history of our city. Who, for example, would have imagined that there had ever been a battle in Briggat?? Yet in the year 1643, Leeds was stormed by the Puritan troops, and a fierce-skirmish took place at the upper end of Briggate. What this meant in the lives of the simple iolk of Leeds, we are going to try and show you.
For this purpose, we must enter the well-built house of Mistress Thompson, a widow, who, since the death of her husband has eked out his savings by selling cakes and other Yorkshire dainties to her neighbours. It is Market Day. and in the large kitchen, with han:s, herbs and shining copper and pewter dishes, the good housewife is busy. Still, that does not prevent her from singing.
In those days everybody sang, and as the curtain of time rolls back, we shall hear an old song, " Maids Are Grown So Cov of Late."
2LO London

THE TROOPING OF THE COLOUR

Relayed from THE HORSE GUARDS PARADE
THE Trooping of the King's Colour is the most impressive display of military ceremonial that London sees during the year. The Ordinary Trooping of the Colour, that takes place every morning on the Horse Guards Parade is itself an imposing spectacle, and today's performance is carried out on a far grander scale by guards drawn from the whole Brigade of Guards.
The B.B.C.'s commentators will be in an ideal position, ov.er the Horse Guards arch leading from Whitehall to the Parade. Directly below them will be the King himself, and the whole of the ceremony takes place under their eyes. The sharp words of command shouted across the square, the clang of rifle-butts and jingling of harness, and the music of the massed hands will all, it is hoped, come into the microphone, as well as the running commentary itself.
5WA Cardiff

MY FAVOURITE BALLADS

A RECITAL by JOSEPH FARRINGTON (Bas3)
MASEFIELD'S breezy ballad of the man who
'must go down to the sea again ' has attracted several Composers. Of all the settings John Ireland's seems best to achieve (in the last line of each verse) the sense of longing that the poem ekpresses-the longing to answer ' the wild call ... that may not be denied.'
THE late Charles Wood 's Ethiopia saluting the Colours is a vivid little picture (the words are
Walt Whitman 's) of an old Negro woman, so ancient, hardly human,' rising from the roadside to curtsey to the troops as they march through Carolina, and telling her story to the onlooker, who sees in her a personification of ancient wrongs.
5XX Daventry

The Southern Command Searchlight Tattoo

London and Other Stations

9.25 The Southern Command Searchlight Tattoo
By kind permission of Gen. Sir Alexander J. Godley, G.O.C. in C. Southern Command
Music and effects with a Descriptive Commentary by Capt. H.B.T. Wakelam, R.A. (R. of O.)
Relayed from the Grounds of Tidworth House, Tidworth, Hants
The Broadcast will begin with introductory remarks by Capt. Wakelam

9.30 The 'First Post by Massed Trumpeters of the 2nd Cavalry Brigade
9.32 Entry of the Massed Bands of the 2nd Cavalry Brigade (Three Bands)
Entry of Massed Bands of the 7th Infantry Brigade (Three Bands)
Combined Advance of all, Massed (Six Bands)
9.50 Trooping of the Colour by the 2nd Cheshire Regiment
10.5 Physical Training Display by Army Gymnastic Staff Music by Massed Bands of the 7th Infantry Brigade
10.15 Entry of Massed Pipe and Drum Bands of Scottish Regiments
10.25 Interlude (See London Programme)
2ZY Manchester

St. George's Day

TROOPING THE COLOURS by THE 1ST BATTALION, FIFTH
Fusiliers
Relayed from Fulford Barracks, York
S.B. from Leeds
2ZY Manchester

St. George's Day

Trooping of the Colours by The First Battalion The Northumberland
Fusiliers
Relayed from FULFORD BARRACKS, YORK
Commentator :
Captain DONALD LINDSAY ,
1st Battalion The Northumberland Fusiliers
Music by THE BAND of THE 1ST BATTALION
THE NORTHUMBERLAND FUSILIERS
(From Leeds)
Regional Programme London

H.M. The King's Birthday

TROOPING THE COLOUR
Relayed from THE HORSEGUARDS, WHITEHALL
(National Programme)
National Programme Daventry

H.M. The King's Birthday

TROOPING THE COLOUR
With a description by Major J. B. S. BOURNE-MAY
Relayed from THE HORSEGUARDS, WHITEHALL
Tho Ceremony will open with the arrival of the Roval Procession, when the Roval Salute will be given.
H.M. THE KING inspects the troops, after which, the massed bands and drums of the Brigade of Guards will play a slow march, countermarch, halt and plav a quick march.
A Drummer beats the Drummers
Call, and the escort marches up to the Colour, the bands and drums playing the ' British Grenadiers.' The Sergeant-Major receives the Colour and hands it to the Ensign for the Colour. The-escort salutes the Colour by presenting arms, the hands and drums playing ' God Save the King.'
Colour and escort march down the line of Guards, and the whole Parade marches past H.M. THE KING in slow time, and again in quick time and finally forms up in line and gives the Royal Saluto.
The Household Cavalry march off. H.M. THE KING places himself at the head of the King's Guard and the Guards march oS to Buckingham Palace, headed by the Massed Bands, Drums and Pipes.
National Programme Daventry

CELEBRATION IN LONDON of the BIRTHDAY OF His MAJESTY THE KING

TROOPING THE COLOUR
ON THE HORSE GUARDS' PARADE
Including a Commentary by Major J. B. S. BOURNE-MAY . Relayed from The Horse
Guards, Whitehall
The Ceremony opens with the arrival of the Royal Procession and the Royal
Salute
H.M. THE KING inspects the troops
After which, the massed bands and drums of THE BRIGADE OF GUARDS play a slow march, countermarch, halt and play a quick march
A Drummer beats the Drummers' Call
And the escort marches up to the COLOUR, the BANDS and drums playing the ' British Grenadiers.' The Sergeant-Major receives the COLOUR and hands it to the Ensign for the Colour. The escort salutes the COLOUR by presenting arms, the bands and drums playing
'GOD SAVE THE KING'
COLOUR and escort marches down the line of Guards and the whole Parade marches past His MAJESTY in slow time, and again in quick time, and finally forms up in line and gives the Royal Salute
THE HOUSEHOLD CAVALRY march off
His MAJESTY places himself at the head of the KING'S GUARD, and the GUARDS march off to BUCKINGHAM PALACE, headed by the Massed Bands, Drums and Pipes
National Programme Daventry

Celebration in London of the Birthday of His Majesty the King: Trooping the Colour on Horse Guards Parade

Including a commentary by Major J. B. S. BOURNE-MAY
The Ceremony opens with the arrival of the ROYAL PROCESSION and the ROYAL SALUTE
H.M. THE KING inspects the troops, after which the massed bands and drums of the BRIGADE OF GUARDS play a slow march, countermarch, halt, and play a quick march.
A Drummer beats the Drummers' Call, and the escort marches up to the Colour, the bands and drums playing the 'British Grenadiers.' The Sergeant-Major receives the Colour and hands it to the Ensign for the Colour. The escort salutes the Colour by presenting arms, the bands and drums playing 'GOD SAVE THE KING.'
Colour and escort march down the line of Guards, and the whole Parade marches past H.M. THE KING in slow time, and again in quick time, and finally forms up in line and gives the ROYAL SALUTE
THE HOUSEHOLD CAVALRY marches off. H.M. THE KING places himself at the head of the KING'S GUARD and the GUARDS march off to BUCKINGHAM PALACE, headed by the MASSED BANDS, DRUMS and Pipes
Relayed from the HORSE GUARDS, WHITEHALL
Regional Programme Midland

SAINT GEORGE'S DAY

THE Boy SCOUT PARADE SERVICE
Relayed from St. Mary's Church, Nottingham
THE BELLS
Hymn, Brightly gleams our banner (Ancient and Modem, No. 390)
Procession of Clergy, Choir and Colour Bearers Throe of the Flags will be placed on the Altar, the remainder taking up position in the Nave Centre Aisle
Prayers, The Right Reverend Bishop NEVILLE TALBOT
(Vicar of St. Mary's)
Hymn, Now thank we all our God (Ancient and Modern, No. 379)
Lesson, Read by Mr. J. A. SrMPSON (District
Commissioner for Nottingham)
Hymn, Jerusalem
Address by Scoutmaster the Right Reverend the LORD BISHOP OF JARROW
All Scouts present will then renew their promise' led by the County Commissioner, Sir LANCELOT ROLLESTON, K.C.B.
Hymn, 0 Jesus, I have promised (Ancient and Modern, No. 271)
Blessing
Fanfare and National Anthem, played by the 2/42nd and 45th TROOPS ScouT BANDS
National Programme Daventry

TROOPING THE COLOUR

Celebration in London of the Birthday of HIS MAJESTY THE KING with a commentary by Major J. B. S. BOURNE-MAY
(late Coldstream Guards)
Relayed from The HORSE GUARDS, WHITEHALL
The Ceremony opens with the arrival of the Royal Procession, and the Royal Salute
H.M. The King inspects the troops, after which the massed bands and drums of the Brigade of Guards play a slow march, counter-march, halt, and play a quick march.
A Drummer beats the Drummers' Call, and the escort marches up to the Colour, the band and drums playing the ' British Grenadiers.' The Sergeant-Major receives the Colour and hands it to the Ensign for the Colour. The escort salutes the Colour by presenting arms, and bands and drums play - 'God Save the King.'
Colour and escort march down the line of Guards, and the whole Parade marches past THE KING in slow time, and again in quick time, and finally forms up in line and gives the Royal Salute.
The Household Cavalry marches off. THE KING places himself at the head of the King's Guard and the Guards march off to Buckingham Palace headed by the Massed Bands, Drums and Pipes
Regional Programme Northern

St. George's Day

Trooping the Colours by the Second Battalion the Northumberland Fusiliers
Relayed from Fulford Barracks, York
Described by an officer of the Regiment
Music by Band and Drums of the 2nd Battalion The Northumberland
Fusiliers
The -whole Battalion is formed up in line
The Officers Commanding Companies inspect their Companies
Band and Drums play a Slow and Quick Troop
The Escorts, preceded by Band and Drums, move forward, are halted and the Subalterns receive the Colours
The Escorts, having taken over the Colours, proceed to troop them
The Battalion forms up for the March Past
The Battalion and Colours form line for Advance in Review Order and General Salute
The Colours are marched off the Parade Ground and Lodged in Form
GOD SAVE THE KING
National Programme Daventry

CELEBRATION IN LONDON OF THE BIRTHDAY OF HIS MAJESTY THE KING TROOPING THE COLOUR

on the Horse Guards Parade, including a Commentary by Major J. B. S. BOURNE-MAY (late Coldstream
Guards)
The Ceremony opens with the arrival of the Royal Procession and the Royal
Salute
H.M. The King inspects the troops, after which the massed bands and drums of the Brigade of Guards play a slow march, countermarch, halt, and play a quick march
A Drummer beats the Drummers' Call, .and the escort marches up to the Colour, the bands and drums playing the British Grenadiers. The Serjeant-Major receives the Colour and hands it to the Ensign for the Colour. The escort salutes the Colour by presenting arms, the bands and drums playing God Save The King. Colour and escort march down the line of Guards, and the whole Parade marches past H.M. The King in slow time, and again in quick time, and finally forms up in line and gives the Royal Salute
The Household Cavalry marches off. H.M. The King places himself at the head of the King's Guard and the Guards march off to Buckingham Palace, headed by the Massed Bands, Drums and Pipes
Relayed from the Horse Guards,
Whitehall
THE FOOT GUARDS who perform the ceremony of ' Trooping the Colour ' consist of five regiments as famous for their gallantry in war as for their discipline and drill.
The Grenadier Guards represent a regiment which served with the exited princes in the Spanish Army, returned at the Restoration in 1660, and received their title in 1815 for their services at Waterloo ; the Coldstream, their title recognised in 1670, were part of the army with which General Monk restored the monarchy, and were called Cold-streamers because they crossed the Tweed into England at the village of Coldstream ; the Scots Guards were raised and maintained in Scotland after the Restoration, marched to London in 1686 and 1688, and were brought on to the English establishment in 1707 ; the Irish Guards were formed in 1902, after the South African War; the Welsh Guards in 1915, in the Great War.
Though all five regiments wear scarlet and black bearskins, there are certain differences to distinguish them, such as the number of buttons worn on the jackets. But there is one easy way to tell at a distance which regiment is which. The Grenadiers wear a small white plume in their bearskins ; - the Coldstream a red plume; the Scots Guards no plume at all ; the Irish
Guards a blue-green one; and the Welsh Guards a green and white one.
Regional Programme Midland

A Light Infantry Programme

The Band and Bugles of the 2nd Bn.
THE KING'S SHROPSHIRE
LIGHT INFANTRY
(By, kind permission of Lieut-Colonel L. H. Torin,
M.C.)
Conducted by Mr. F. W. DENNETT
The 2nd Bn. The King's Shropshire Light Infantry is revisiting its home counties of Shropshire and Hereford after having been absent, except for very short periods, for 117 years. Next month new colours are to be presented to the regiment at Shrewsbury by the Duke of York, and the old colours are to be placed in Hereford Cathedral. Mr. F. W. Dennett, the bandmaster, was posted to the regiment in 1931. ' The Shrewsbury Troop ', which is included in the programme, was composed by him specially for the presentation ceremony. The programme for this broadcast will open with the Regimental Call, followed immediately by a bugle flourish. Bugle-Major E. Dixon, who wrote the flourish, was also the composer of the Bugle Flourish for the Aldershot Tattoo in 1929, now used as the interval signal for Radio-Normandie.
Regional Programme Northern

St. George's Day Trooping the Colours

by THE 2ND BATTALION
THE NORTHUMBERLAND
FUSILIERS
Relayed from Fulford Barracks, York
Described by an Officer of the Regiment
Music by Band and Drums of the 2nd
Battalion the Northumberland Fusiliers
The whole Battalion is formed up in line
The Officers Commanding Companies inspect their Companies
Bands and Drums play a Slow and Quick Troop
The Escorts, preceded by Band and Drums, move forward, are hatted, and the Subalterns receive the Colours
The Escorts having taken over the Colours proceed to troop them, the Battalion forms up for the March Past
The Battalion and Colours form line for Advance in Review Order and General Salute
The Colours are marched off the Parade Ground and Lodged in Form
God save the King






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