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BBC Radio London

John Snagge's London

The City of Westminster
The first of three monthly programmes in which John Snagge takes a personal look at some of the historical sites and curiosities to be seen in the capital. This month he visits Westminster, starting inside the clock tower of He then looks at the remains of the Tudor sports centre in Downing Street, Henry VIII 's wine cellar beneath the Ministry of Defence in Whitehall, Queen Mary's steps and the pump room beneath Trafalgar Square. JOHN SNAGGE also visits the Royal Mews at Buckingham Palace to see the Coronation coach, Edward III 's jewel tower, the waxworks at Westminster Abbey, the Admiralty Board Room and Churchill's secret underground wartime headquarters at Storey's Gate. Technical presentation GRAHAM CLIFFORD and GODFREY FERRIES Producer ROGER CLARK
The next programme in this series can be heard on Sunday 4 April when John Snagge looks at the River.
BBC Radio London

John Snagge's London

The City
The final programme in which JOHN SNAGGE takes a personal look at some of the historical and curious places to be seen in the capital.
This month he goes to the City to talk to the Lord Mayor at the Mansion House, tests the echo in the whispering gallery of St Paul's Cathedral, visits the Roman fort at Cripplegate and examines the Domesday Book, Magna Carta, Guy Fawkes ' Confessions, a letter from Hitler and Shakespeare's will in the Public Records Office.
JOHN SNAGGE also visits the attic where Doctor Johnson compiled his dictionary, Prince Henry's room in Fleet Street, looks at the remains of the Carmelite monastery beneath The News of the World offices, finds out how to insure a super tanker at Lloyd's, meets a gas lighter at the Temple and goes 70 feet down to see London's other underground railway where the trains have no drivers, guards or passengers. Technical presentation GRAHAM CLIFFORD
Producer ROGER CLARK
BBC Radio London

John Snagge's London

The River Thames
The second of three monthly programmes in which JOHN SNAGGE takes a personal look at some of the historical and curious places to be seen in the capital. This month he looks at the River Thames. Starting at Tower Bridge, where new machinery has just been installed, he makes his way up and down the River on board a police launch and visits the world's only floating police station, Captain Scott's ship, The Discovery, the Port of London Authority, the cruiser HMS Belfast, the Thames Division museum at Wapping and the launching site of Brunei's ship The Great Eastern.
Technical presentation GRAHAM CLIFFORD
Producer ROGER CLARK
(The final programme in this series can he heard on Sunday 2 May, when John Snagge looks at The City)
BBC Radio London

John Snagge's London

The National Army Museum
This week JOHN SNAGGE visits the National Army Museum in Chelsea. He looks at the cloak in which General Wolfe was wrapped after his death on the Heights of Abraham and the pencil-written order and bugle that set in motion the Charge of the Light Brigade. JOHN SNAGGE begins by describing the Museum's strangest exhibit:
Producer ROGER CLARK
BBC Radio London

John Snagge's London

The Bank of England - 2
To celebrate the 50th programme in the series, JOHN SNAGGE continues his visit to the Bank of England. This week he finds out about an attack that was made on a former Secretary to the bank. Kenneth Grahame (who was the author of The Wind in the Willoivs), and John Snagge also talks to the present Secretary of the Bank to find out how it works today.
Producer FOGER CLARK
BBC Radio London

John Snagge Remembers

Fifty years ago this month, John Snagge joined the BBC.
He is best remembered for commentating every Boat Race since 1931 but his voice has also been heard reading some of the most historic news bulletins of our time. In this programme John Snagge visits some of the places in London that have been most significant in his career - Savoy Hill where he made his first broadcast, Westminster Abbey and Broadcasting House
Presented by MURRAY NICOL
(broadcast on 10 December)
BBC Radio London

John Snagge's London

Keats House
This week JOHN SNAGGE visits the house in Hampstead where lived the poet John Keats. Here he wrote Ode To a Nightingale, The Eve of St Agnes, and Hyperion and he also met Fanny Brawne , with whom he fell in love. Producer ROGER CLARK
BBC Radio London

John Snagge's London

The Battle of Britain Museum
This week John Snagge looks at famous enemy and Allied aircraft with Dr John Tanner.
Producer ROGER CLARK
BBC Radio London

John Snagge's London

Meteorites and Moon Rocks
This week JOHN SNAGGE visits the Natural History Museum in South Kensington to look at the world's largest collection of meteorites - the only tangible objects to come to us from outer space. The largest in the museum weighs three-and-a-half tons and the oldest has remained unchanged for 4,600 million years. John also examines a piece of moon rock presented by President Nixon. Producer ROGER CLARK
BBC Radio London

John Snagge's London: James Bond

In the second of two programmes, John Snagge visits Pinewood Studios to see the production of the latest James Bond film "The Spy Who Loved Me". He talks to Roger Moore (alias James Bond) and actress Barbara Bach, who plays a Russian spy. John also looks at the world's largest film set - the interior of a giant super-tanker that has kidnapped three nuclear submarines! He talks to its designer, Ken Adam, and to the film's director, Lewis Gilbert.
BBC Radio London

John Snagge's London Organ-building (1)

This week, in the first of two programmes, John Snagge visits the Mander Organ works at Bethnal Green. He looks at some historic organs, including one on which Milton is reputed to have played, as well as a modern transportable instrument. John also finds out about the new organ for St Paul's Cathedral that was built here and was completed just in time for the Queen's Silver Jubilee.
Producer ROGER CLARK
BBC Radio London

John Snagge's London

Concorde
This week, JOHN SNAGGE goes aboard the world's fastest airliner, Concorde, at Heathrow Airport. The plane flies as fast as a bullet and twice as high as Mount Everest. JOHN finds out its secrets.
Producer ROGER CLARK
BBC Radio London

John Snagge's London

Westminster Abbey Choir School Today JOHN SNAGGE visits one of the most famous choir schools in the country and looks at its work. He talks to the organist and master of the choristers, DOUGLAS GUEST, about how he organises music for royal occasions.
Producer ROGER CLARK
BBC Radio London

John Snagge's London

The National Postal Museum
This week John SNAGGE visits what is probably the most important and extensive collection of postage stamps in the world. It contains virtually every British stamp since the Penny Black of 1840 and thousands of original designs and trial stamps.
Producer ROGER CLARK
BBC Radio London

John Snagge at the Mansion House

For a year of his office the Lord Mayor of London, Sir Lindsay Ring , lives at the Mansion House. He is the City's Chief Magistrate, summoning and presiding over meetings of the Court of Aldermen, the Court of Common Council and the Common Hall. He is there to advance the welfare and status of the City and takes part in many of its ceremonies...
JOHN SNAGGE talks to him aboui his work and duties and they visit some of the State apartments, the strongrooms where the City's gold and silver treasures are stored, the cells in the basement where the suffragette Mrs Pankhurst was imprisoned and the Magistrates' Court.
Technical presentation BILL RAPLEY
Producer ROGER CLARK
BBC Radio London

John Snagge's London

Alexandra Palace (2)
This week. John Snagge visits for the second time the original home of BBC Television to talk to one of the producers, Donald Munro. And today, they look at the television service when it re-opened after the Second World War.
Producer ROGER CLARK
BBC Radio London

John Snagge's London

RAF Museum, Hendon Part 2
This week in the second of two programmes from the Royal Air Force Museum. JOHN SNAGGE looks at the Battle of Britain. He talks to two men who helped to win it, Group Captain Sir Douglas Bader , who lost both legs in a flying accident and was captured after a collision with enemy aircraft; and Wing Commander Stanford-Tuck, who fought over Dunkirk, had 27 confirmed victories, was twice wounded and baled out four times.
Producer ROGER CLARK
BBC Radio London

John Snagge's London

Pollock's Toy Museum
This week JOHN SNAGGE visits the toy museum in Scala Street that specialises in toy theatres. In the 19th-century toy theatre sheets were sold ' penny plain and tuppence coloured.' By the turn of the century they had almost disappeared but for the efforts of Benjamin Pollock , who devoted his life to them. In 1955 Mrs Marguerite Fawdry bought up all the copper plates and a large stock of old theatrical prints that formed the stock of the original Pollock's Toy Theatre Shop and they are now permanently preserved. The museum also contains dolls, bygone toys, peep-shows. jigsaw puzzles and a curious musical instrument - a polyphone.
Producer ROGER CLARK
BBC Radio London

John Snagge's London

The Cabinet War Rooms
The whole of Whitehall is tunnelled under by a maze of underground rooms and passages. There are said to be 23 miles of corridors and at their heart lies Winston Churchill's secret Cabinet War
Rooms. JOHN SNAGGE visits the place where some of the most vital decisions of the Second World War were taken. Producer ROGER CLARK
BBC Radio London

John Snagge's London

Lloyds of London
This week JOHN SNAGGE visits the great international insurance market in the City of London. It began as a 17thcentury coffee house where Edward Lloyd supplied his customers with shipping information. Eventually, it was organised as a formal group of underwriters who accepted marine risks and later handled property and fire insurance. Producer ROGER CLARK






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