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: THE DAILY SERVICE

From page 12 of ' When Two or Three'

: Talk

: THE WESTERN STUDIO ORCHESTRA

Leader, Frank Thomas
Selection of Sanderson's Popular Songs
(West Regional Programme)

Contributors

Leader: Frank Thomas

: THE COMMODORE GRAND ORCHESTRA

Directed by Joseph Muscant
Relayed from
The Commodore Theatre,
Hammersmith

Contributors

Directed By: Joseph Muscant

: HAROLD RAMSAY

At The Organ of The Granada,
Tooting

: ANOTHER SARONY HOUR

'Tweet-Tweet'
Second Edition
Devised by LESLIE SARONY
Book, Music and Lyrics by LESLIE SARONY and LESLIE HOLMES with PHYLLIS STAINER PATRICK COLBERT
ARTY ASH
HAZEL SHELLEY DORIS PALMER LESLIE HOLMES
THE REVUE CHORUS
SYDNEY JEROME 'S ORCHESTRA and LESLIE SARONY

Contributors

Unknown: Leslie Sarony
Unknown: Leslie Sarony
Unknown: Leslie Holmes
Unknown: Phyllis Stainer
Unknown: Patrick Colbert
Unknown: Hazel Shelley
Unknown: Doris Palmer
Unknown: Leslie Holmes
Unknown: Sydney Jerome
Unknown: Leslie Sarony

: All Nationals except Daventry THE B.B.C. DANCE ORCHESTRA

Directed by HENRY HALL
5.15 Daventry
The Children's Hour
HARCOURT WILLIAMS in an old fairy tale
' Another adventure of Eustace,' by C. E. HODGES
Louis VALENTINE 'S Drawing
Competition
Microphone Correspondence

Contributors

Directed By: Henry Hall
Unknown: Harcourt Williams
Unknown: C. E. Hodges
Unknown: Louis Valentine

: 'The First News'

Weather Forecast, First General News Bulletin and Bulletin for Farmers

: Interlude

: Sports Talk

GEORGE F. ALLISON : The Way to
Wembley'
LET THERE BE no confusion. G. F. Allison , this evening, is not to tell you how to get to Wembley, but how Manchester City and Portsmouth have got there ; how it is they are to play each other in the Cup Final next Saturday.
The way to Wembley, in that sense, is an arduous one, and, as the Cup Finalists would be the first to admit, one governed by luck as well as by merit. The luck of health, the luck of the draw, the luck of the game. To quote the Spurs' centre-half : ! Luck plays a big part in football '.
Listeners will remember
Arthur Rowe 's broadcast at the beginning of February, when he pointed out that to win the Cup and also to be top of the League in the same season, a team had to play six Cup Ties (without counting replays) and forty-two League games ; at least forty-eight matches in a thirty-six week season. To keep fit, fresh ; never to get stale. It will be seen
what Manchester City and Portsmouth have achieved to reach the Cup Final.
On April 28 they will walk out over the grass to a storm of cheers, fleet of foot and well-muscled as the grey-hounds that race round it at night. And the Cup will be carried back in triumph to Manchester or to Portsmouth, just as luck and skill decide. Then for one more year months of anxiety will be at an end. Not until next autumn need managers and trainers and captains worry about injuries, illness, loss of form, unsettling influences at home. They will be talking of Wembley, 1934, with their eyes fixed all the time on Wembley, 1935, while they think out the way there.

Contributors

Unknown: George F. Allison
Unknown: G. F. Allison
Unknown: Arthur Rowe

: All Nationals except Daventry A Pianoforte Recital

by PEGGY MALE
6.45 Daventry
Welsh Interlude
IFOR L. EVANS : Here and There in South Africa '

Contributors

Unknown: L. Evans

: Time to Spare

THE PLIGHT of the unemployed man who has prospects of work at some time or other is bad enough; he hangs on. The clerk hopes for that vacancy, the skilled labourer for an imprbvement in his particular trade. But the plight of the unemployed man, such as the Welsh miner, who may never get work again, is beyond words to describe.
There are many villages in South
Wales where from 70 to 80 per cent. of the men have been out of work for six or seven years. For six or seven years they and their families have been existing on inadequate food. Theirs is an acceptance rather than an acquiescence. They are acclimatised now to poverty, but their surplus energy has gone ; they are without hope, their bodies vitiated, their stamina sapped.
A recent visitor to South Wales went round one of the hospitals and found a silence in the wards. No talk, no animation. She learnt that an average housewife in a typical village had about 8s. a week over to feed a family of four or five, paying rent and so forth. Only those whose men had allotments or gardens could provide green vegetables, for a small cabbage was 4d. in the shops. They could not afford bacon, which was a shilling a pound. In these tiny villages there are only small shops that offer no chance of a bargain.
Sometimes the children look happier and sturdier than the parents, who make perpetual sacrifices for them. Their health is cared for, clinics and schools look after them, clothes are sent. But not boots and shoes. The mothers must ' scrape ' to get these patched and repaired.
Last week listeners heard the point of view of a down-and-out Londoner. The Welsh miner's point of view, given by himself, will be one of the many broadcasts in this series.

: In Town Tonight

A Topical Supplement to the Week's
Programmes

: MRS. JACK HYLTON WITH HER BOYS

in an hour of Dance Music

: 'The Second News'

Weather Forecast, Second General News Bulletin

: Water Front and Open Sea Captain DAVID BONE

(From Glasgow)
THESE TALKS breathe the sea. The ' hand aloft to the look-out' , when a ship gets under way; the pilot's ' G'd day, Capten ', as he comes aboard ; the roar from the Customs launch; ' The Ship ahoy ! Where are ye from ? ' come only from a sailor.
David W. Bone , author of that enthralling book ' The Lookoutman', knows every mood of the sea. Fair weather and foul, luck and mascots, ports at home and abroad, he has stories in abundance to tell of them. He is as conversant with luxury liners as with tramps; with the ' list' of a timber ship as with the ' lean ' of a vessel under sail.
One of his vivid memories dates from the days when he was serving indentures on a sailing ship, when he visited a former shipmate on a steamship. The great hatchways roused a new feeling in him, a sense of insecurity that made him step warily. Moving into a recessed doorway, he looked down at the engines and realised that she did not smell like a ship. He missed the proper sea tang, the whiff of itar and ropes and pine spars. He inquired about the work, and his friend told him, and added: ' We don't muck around like you do in a crazy old windjammer'. Bone realised the gulf that lay between them.

Contributors

Unknown: David W. Bone

: 'The Extra Hour'

A Summer-time Symposium
(See- below)
THIS FEATURE PROGRAMME is designed to honour a neglected benefactor of the modern world and, at the same time, to provide an example of that kind of topical programme-building which is one of the special functions of broadcasting. Its theme is the campaign waged between 1907 and 1915 by William Willett , builder and health-enthusiast, to secure an extra hour of sunlight every day during the summer months by the simple expedient of putting-the clock forward by an hour. It is a serio-comic tale, which will give to the thousands who perform this now annual operation tomorrow night some idea of the difficulties, prejudices, and opposition encountered by the man who first thought of doing what they now do annually almost without thinking. With the telling of this story the broadcast combines such illustrations, in sound and music, of the sports and pastimes to which ' the extra hour ' is devoted, as radio production can devise.

Contributors

Unknown: William Willett

Blog post that mentions this programme:

The Sunday Post: Clocking on - the BBC and BST through the years 26 March 2017

: ' Trebisond, Jonah and the Minnows', by Humbert Wolfe,

and 'Prayer for an old Gardener', by Cecil Roberts
Read by NADJA GREEN

Contributors

Unknown: Cecil Roberts
Read By: Nadja Green

: DANCE MUSIC

The B.B.C. DANCE ORCHESTRA, directed by HENRY HALL
(Shipping Forecast, on Daventry only at 11.0)

Contributors

Directed By: Henry Hall








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