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Listings

: For Women: Leisure and Pleasure

Introduced by Jeanne Heal.

I'd like you to meet...
Lucienne Day fabric designer

Painting
Mervyn Levy gives the seventh lesson on painting for amateurs.

Bookshelf
A discussion on 'The Art of being a Parent' by Amabel Williams-Ellis.

Roll Up the Carpet
Sydney and Mary Thompson show how to dance the Empress Promenade Waltz.

Contributors

Introduced By: Jeanne Heal
Speaker (I'd like you to meet...): Lucienne Day
Painter/presenter (Painting): Mervyn Levy
Dancer (Roll Up the Carpet): Sydney Thompson
Dancer (Roll Up the Carpet): Mary Thompson
Edited By: Jacqueline Kennish
Producer: S. E. Reynolds

: For the Very Young: Andy Pandy

Maria Bird brings Andy to play with your small children and invites them to join in songs and games.
Gladys Whitred sings the songs
Audrey Atterbury and Molly Gibson pull the strings
Script, music, and settings by Maria Bird
(A BBC film)

Contributors

Narrator/script, music and settings: Maria Bird
Singer: Gladys Whitred
Puppeteer: Audrey Atterbury
Puppeteer: Molly Gibson

: Children's Television: Huckleberry Finn: 4 - The Rightful King of France?

by Mark Twain.
Adapted for television as a serial play in seven parts by W. S. Merwin.
The action takes place floating down the Mississippi.

Contributors

Author: Mark Twain
Adapter: W. S. Merwin
Producer: Vivian Milroy
Settings: Stephen Taylor
Huckleberry Finn: Colin Campbell
Jim: Orlando Martins
Elder rogue: Mark Daly
Younger rogue: Peter Martyn
A country 'Jake': Lyndon Brook

: Newsreel

: Other People's Jobs: The Miner

Television cameras visit miners at work at the coal face in Tillicoultry mine, Scotland.
See 'Talk of the Week'

Contributors

Commentator: Alastair Borthwick
Commentator: James Buchan
Commentator: Jameson Clark
Presented for television by: Audrey Singer

: Another Language

A play by Rose Franken.
The action takes place in London. Time: The Present

Mrs. Hallam has four sons-and four daughters-in-law. Though her youngest son is thirty-five, she still exercises a dominating influence over her children and, as if to prove how strong are the ties binding the Hallams, she gathers the family together at her house every Sunday evening. The sons are all 'in business', though Victor, the youngest, once had dreams of another kind of career. Stella, his wife, who has resisted attempts to mould her to the family pattern, is still regarded as an outsider. She speaks 'another language'. The play opens with one of her infrequent appearances at the regular family party when she renews acquaintance with her nephew Peter-now twenty-one and dangerously like the youthful Victor. The results of this meeting make a play that shows the conflicting emotions and ideals that exist beneath the surface of an apparently united family. (Mary Maxted)

Contributors

Author: Rose Franken
Producer: Desmond Hawkins
Settings: James Bould
Mrs Hallam: Mary Jerrold
Mr Hallam: Oliver Johnston
Harry: John Warwick
Helen: Philippa Hiatt
Grace: Dorothy Baird
Walter: William Mervyn
Paul: Richard Caldicot
Etta: Eve Watkinson
Stella: Isabel Dean
Victor: Raymond Young
Peter: Tony Britton








About this project

This site contains the BBC listings information which the BBC printed in Radio Times between 1923 and 2009. You can search the site for BBC programmes, people, dates and Radio Times editions.

We hope it helps you find information about that long forgotten BBC programme, research a particular person or browse your own involvement with the BBC.

Through the listings, you will also be able to use the Genome search function to find thousands of radio and TV programmes that are already available to view or listen to on the BBC website, and programmes to purchase from BBC Store and other providers.

There are more than 5 million programme listings in Genome. This is a historical record of the planned output and the BBC services of any given time. It should be viewed in this context and with the understanding that it reflects the attitudes and standards of its time - not those of today.

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This internal version of Genome, which includes all the magazine covers, images and articles as well as the programme listings from the Radio Times, is different to the version of BBC Genome that is available externally/to the public. It is only available inside the BBC network.

Your use of this version of Genome is covered by the BBC Acceptable Use of Information Systems Policy and these terms.

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