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: To Cross or not to Cross...

Over 15,000 road accidents happen monthly. Experts show you how some of them occur. Watch pedestrians in Chiswick High Street and see the mistakes most commonly made

Contributors

Producer: Keith Rogers

Blog post that mentions this programme:

The Sunday Post: The 1947 Fuel Crisis and the BBC 5 March 2017

: Fred the Ant

A puppet film from Czechoslovakia

: The Last Curtain

The Embassy Ballet (Directed by Molly Lake)
The story is of ballet a hundred years ago. Theophile Gautier, great ballet critic of the day. writes his impressions of the farewell performance of a famous ballerina, Emilienne Lagrange. He reads his words. The scene fades to part of Mlle. Lagrange's actual performance. The curtain falls. Dupont and the Ballet Master pay her homage. It rises again on preparation for the dress rehearsal of the ballerina who is to take over her part. All the usual trials of a dress rehearsal ensue, but the new ballerina acquits herself admirably, receiving the Ballet Master's approbation, even Lagrange's discarded bouquet. The tired company depart. The forgotten ballerina returns, looks around the empty stage and realises that it is indeed her Last Curtain.

Contributors

Music: Weber
Costumes: Eva Melova
Choreography/director: Molly Lake
Orchestra conductor: Alan Bixter
Presented by: D.H. Munro
Dancers: The Embassy Ballet
Dancers: Corps de Ballet
The Critic: Michael Feacer
Emilienne Lagrange (The Retiring Ballerina): Molly Lake
Alexis Dupont, her partner: Travis Kemp
Ballet Master: Jak Carter
Coryphee: Avril Nairn
Coryphee: Peggy Stevens
Mile Albertina: Johanna Barrett
Stage hand: Dennis Carey
Danseuse Travestie: Pamela Sabine
Wardrobe Mistress: Monica Boam

: The Cherry Orchard

by Anton Chekhov.
Translated by S.S. Koteliansky.
The scene is Russia, and the action takes place at the country estate of Madame Ranevsky in the year 1890.

Contributors

Author: Anton Chekhov
Translated by: S.S. Koteliansky
The Orchestra: Dale Rogers
The Orchestra: Ronald Spurling
The Orchestra: Stanley Platts
The Orchestra: Leslie Linder
The Orchestra: John Scott
Guitarist: Geoffrey Sisley
Settings: Barry Learoyd
Producer: Fred O'Donovan
Mme Ranevsky: Marian Spencer
Anya: Irmgard Spoliansky
Varya: Patricia Hilliard
Gayev: Richard Hurndall
Lopakhin: Jack Livesey
Trofimov: David Markham
Pischik: Sebastian Cabot
Charlotta: Rosemary Lomax
Yepikhodov: Anthony Drake
Dounyasha: Maria Britneva
Feers: Gordon Phillott
Yasha: Derek Elphinstone
Stranger: Ronald Sidney
The station master: Wilfrid Brambell
A post office clerk: Michael Rose
The Guests: Kyle Adair
The Guests: Shirley Bagrit
The Guests: Jane Orr
The Guests: Mary Clayton
The Guests: Hildur Kalman
The Guests: Peter Dyer
The Guests: David Stoll
The Guests: Gunnar Ejolssen
The Guests: Richard Coward

Blog post that mentions this programme:

The Sunday Post: Galton and Simpson 27 September 2015








About this project

This site contains the BBC listings information which the BBC printed in Radio Times between 1923 and 2009. You can search the site for BBC programmes, people, dates and Radio Times editions.

We hope it helps you find information about that long forgotten BBC programme, research a particular person or browse your own involvement with the BBC.

Through the listings, you will also be able to use the Genome search function to find thousands of radio and TV programmes that are already available to view or listen to on the BBC website, and programmes to purchase from BBC Store and other providers.

There are more than 5 million programme listings in Genome. This is a historical record of the planned output and the BBC services of any given time. It should be viewed in this context and with the understanding that it reflects the attitudes and standards of its time - not those of today.

Welcome to BBC Genome

Genome is a digitised version of the Radio Times from 1923 to 2009 and is made available for internal research purposes only. You will need to obtain the relevant third party permissions for any use, including use in programmes, online etc.

This internal version of Genome, which includes all the magazine covers, images and articles as well as the programme listings from the Radio Times, is different to the version of BBC Genome that is available externally/to the public. It is only available inside the BBC network.

Your use of this version of Genome is covered by the BBC Acceptable Use of Information Systems Policy and these terms.

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