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: Miss IDA TODD: Renovating Last Summer's Wardrobe'

THIS talk is intended to be of particular use to those home dressmakers who, having very little experience of renovation, are anxious to make the best possible use of last season's dresses.

: A BRASS BAND CONCERT

S.B. from Newcastle
Artists from the London Studio
GARDA HALL (Soprano)
WATCYN WATCYNS (Baritone) The MARSDEN COI.LIERY BAND
Conducted by JACK BODDICE
THE Brass Band came into being originally as a mounted band, most of the instruments being easier to manipulate in one hand, while the player holds the bridle rein with the other, than the woodwinds would have been. The French call it a 'Fanfare,' applying the same term to a cavalry band on mounted duty. It has naturally not the same fullness and variety as the complete Military Band, but can produce very rich, sonorous tone with gradations of quality and strength which are remarkable when one knows its limitations. In this country, almost more than anywhere else, brass bands have long been popular apart from any military use, and many societies and industrial concerns have their own brass bands, which often reach a very high pitch of excellence. Our British brass band contests are unique in their own way.
VON SUPPE, best known to us by such evergreen favourites as the Overtures Poet and Peasant and Light Cavalry, wrote for the light opera stage with such tireless industry that, according to one authority, he left the amazing number of 165 light operas and smaller works, as well as at least two grand operas. Boccaccio was one of the comparatively few which were heard in London. It was given here at the Comedy Theatre in 1882, and was warmly welcomed. The music is full of that charm and brightness which we associate with the Viennese stage, and though only the Overture is now played, it, at least, bids fair to keep its place as a favourite concert piece.
It is interesting to note that Suppe anticipated
Lilac Time by a little opera which he called Franz Schubert , and in which some of Schubert's own melodies were incorporated.
DELIBES' most successful Grand Opera was broadcast at the end of February, so that listeners had an opportunity of deciding for themselves whether or not he was as successful in that serious vein as he is with Ballets and similar light music. In his own day there was no doubt at all about the popularity of his Ballets and of some of his lighter stage pieces, but like many men who have won success in that way, he was anxious to achieve a similar position on the serious opera stage, an ambition which he only partially realized. Suites or Selections from the music of three of his Ballets are frequently played—Sylvia, Coppelia, and La Source (The Fountain)—and it would be difficult to say which of the three is the most popular. All are tuneful and melodious with that lightness of touch and airy grace which we call French, and all lend themselves well to arrangement for military band and in other ways.

March, ' Punchinello ' - arr. Rimmer
Overture, ' Boccaccio ' - Suppé
GARDA HALL Voci di primavera (Voices of Spring) - Johann Strauss
I heard a piper piping - Arnold Bax
BAND Ballet Music from ' CoppSlia ' - Delibes
Intermezzo, ' The Piper's Wedding' - arr. Glen
WATCYN WATCYNS A Lover's Garland - Farry
At the Hour the Long Day Ends - Farry
Love is a Bable - Farry
BAND Trombone Solo, Men of Harlech' (Soloist, Master W. BLACKETT>) - Round
Dance Humoresque, ' The Merry Men ' - arr. Simmer
GARDA HALL Lullaby (1915) - Kreisler
A Funny Fellow (A Song of Fantasy) - Head
BAND Military Overture, 'La Militaire' arr. - Raymond
Mary - Richardson
WATCYN WATCYNS The Tramp - Stanley Taylor
The Pibroch - Stanford
BAND Selection from Sanderson's Popular Songs - arr. Ord Hume

: THE CHILDREN'S HOUR:

Selections by THE POPLAR TRAINING SCHOOL
BOYS'BRASS BAND
(Winners of the Southern Counties
Boys' Brass Band Championship)
' How Jackhals fed Oom Leeuw ' from Outa Karel's (South African) Stories
(Sanni Metelerkamp )
' Tin Cows' —a story of the Far West (Tom J.
Hopkins).

: WEATHER FORECAST, FIRST GENERAL NEWS BUL

LETIN : Announcements and Sports Bulletin

: THE FOUNDATIONS OF MUSIC

DEBUSSY'S SONGS
Sung by ANNE THURSFIELD (Soprano)
Crois mon conseil chere Climene (Take my advice, Climene) (1910) Je tremble en voyant ton visage (I tremble on seeing your face) (1910) Quoy qu'on tient belle Langagieres (Although you keep your beauty
Langagieres) (1910)
Soupir (Sighs) (1913)
Placet futile (Idle Pleasure) (1913) Noel Des enfants qui n'ont plus de Maisons (The Waifs' Xmas) (1915)

: Vaudeville

including
QUATUOR VOCAL RUSSE.
MOUSSORGSKY :
W. WORESTCHAGUINE (Fitst
Tenor)
A. TROUNENKE
B. ZAKHAROFF (Baritone)
W. SALIVON (Bass)
JACK PAYNE and THE B.B.C. DANCE ORCHESTRA

: Musical Comedy Programme

OLIVE GROVES (Soprano)
ROBERT CHIGNELL (Baritone)
THE WIRELESS ORCHESTRA
Conducted by JOHN ANSELL








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