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THE GOON SHOW

Synopsis

We have recently produced a Style Guide to help editors follow a standard format when editing a listing. If you are unsure how best to edit this programme please take a moment to read it.
Peter Sellers , Harry Secombe and SpikeVMilligan in * The Affair of the Lone Banana '
Fred Nurke is missing! An over-ripe banana, in a deserted Cannon Street shipping office, is the only clue to his whereabouts. Inspector Ned Seagoon follows the trail to a British Embassy in South America, where he is iust in time to help the Embassy staff in a brush with the rebels. Why are Senor Gonzales Mess and his gang trying to cut down the only banana tree in the Embassy gardens and what is the connection between Fred Nurke and the over-ripe banana in Cannon Street?
Cast in order of speaking:
The Ray Ellington Quartet
Max Geldray
Orchestra conducted by Wally Stott
Announcer. Wallace Greenslade
Script bySpike Milligan Production by Peter Eton

Contributors

Unknown: Peter Sellers
Unknown: Harry Secombe
Unknown: Fred Nurke
Unknown: Ned Seagoon
Unknown: Senor Gonzales Mess
Unknown: Fred Nurke
Unknown: Max Geldray
Conducted By: Wally Stott
Script By: Spike Milligan
Production By: Peter Eton
Fred Nurke: Peter Sellers
Miss Minnie Bannister: Spike Milligan
Inspector Ned Seagoon: Harry Secombe
Gravely Headstone: Peter Sellers
Eccles: Spike Milligan
Senor Gonzales Mess: Harrv Secombe
Mr Henry Crun: Peter Sellers
Quagmire Vest: Spike Milligan
Fred Bogg: Harry Secombe
Major Denis Bloodnok: Peter Sellers

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This site contains the BBC listings information which the BBC printed in Radio Times between 1923 and 2009. You can search the site for BBC programmes, people, dates and Radio Times editions.

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